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Boston Mayor Announced Verizon Partnership And Fiber High-Speed Internet Expansion Across City

Verizon logo During a Boston City Council meeting in October 2015, Verizon representatives firmly stated the company's disinterest in expanding its FiOS fiber-based high-speed Internet services throughout the city. That position resulted in a lack of broadband Internet competition, with Comcast often the only service available in teh city. (The FCC increased the minimum broadband speed, so DSL services no longer qualify.) I was pleasantly surprised when Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announced on Tuesday:

"... a new partnership with Verizon to make Boston one of the most technologically advanced cities in the country by replacing its copper-based infrastructure with a state-of-the-art fiber-optic network platform across the city. The new network will offer enormous bandwidth and speeds. Through an investment of more than $300 million from Verizon over six years, this change will bring increased competition and choice for broadband and entertainment services in Boston..."

This is welcome news. Other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) offer slower speeds and charge high prices for those slower speeds. This worldwide study found that municipal broadband networks provide consumers with the best value (e.g., highest speeds at the lowest prices via wired lines). Thankfully, Massachusetts is not one of the 19 states with laws that prevent local towns and cities from forming their own municipal broadband networks. Consumers everywhere need choice and more competition.

Verizon fiber broadband construction in Boston will start:

"... in Dorchester, West Roxbury and the Dudley Square neighborhood of Roxbury in 2016, followed by Hyde Park, Mattapan, and other areas of Roxbury and Jamaica Plain. The city has also agreed to provide an expedited permitting process to encourage this build... As a next step, the city will begin the cable television licensing process. Upon successful completion of the licensing process, Verizon expects to offer FiOS TV service in Boston... Verizon kicked off the new collaboration by presenting a $100,000 Digital Equity contribution to the city, which will be used to support a mobile hotspot lending program at the Boston Public Library."

The partnership will measure demand from residents and businesses, and prioritize construction, using the www.verizon.com/BostonFiber website. Residents and businesses should visit the site and vote (for free) to ensure that their neighborhood gets fiber broadband first.

The partnership also includes the installation of Internet-connected devices in public areas, which is one portion of the Internet-ofThings (ioT):

"... an innovative "Smart Cities" trial that will address traffic safety and congestion along the Massachusetts Avenue Vision Zero Priority Corridor. The city and Verizon will experiment with sensors and advanced traffic signal control technology to increase safety, measure bicycle traffic, improve public transit vehicle flow, and decrease congestion. Future "Smart Cities" applications will address other key services, including environmental sensors, energy efficiency, and city lighting management."

As the projects move forward, it will be interesting to learn about what data will be collected by ioT devices and data-sharing agreements. Details matter. Verizon also announced:

"This partnership will also improve wireless services in Boston by enabling Verizon to attach wireless equipment to city street lights and utility poles, helping residents get fast, reliable mobile service."

Fiber broadband availability is good news. I visited the Boston Fiber website and voted. The site asks for your full name, email, and mobile phone number to provide availability updates. The site confirmed that I live in the area the partnership considers Zone A: the first area to get Verizon FiOS.

With all of this good news, sadly it seems to already be two steps forward and one step backward. Verizon has failed to reach agreement with its workers' unions, who went on strike yesterday. CNN reported:

"Most of the striking workers service the company's landline phone business and FiOS broadband network -- not the much larger Verizon Wireless network. They have gone without a contract since August, and their union, the Communication Workers of America, says it is fighting to get Verizon to come to the table with a better offer. The union's list of complaints is a long one: Verizon has outsourced 5,000 jobs to workers in Mexico, the Philippines and the Dominican Republic. Verizon is hiring more low-wage, non-union contractors... The union also claims Verizon won't negotiate with people who work in Verizon stores and is closing call centers. And Verizon is asking workers to work out of state, away from their homes, for months at a time. Meanwhile, the union says Verizon is cutting costs as its profits have soared."

I am sure that many residents and businesses want to order Verizon FiOS fiber broadband, and have it installed by fully trained and experienced technicians, not hastily gathered replacements.

After I voted, the Verizon website presented the image below with relative vote counts for Boston fiber:

Verizon FiOS fiber broadband Internet for Boston. Relative vote counts by neighborhoods. Click to view larger image

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