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Consumer Reports: Don't Use Consumers as 'Guinea Pigs For Vehicle Safety Beta Programs'

Consumer Reports logo The recent fatal crash involving a Tesla auto operating with the Autopilot feature has highlighted the issues with beta software in commercially-available vehicles. Consumer reports discussed the matter in a recent blog post:

"The company’s aggressive roll-out of self-driving technology—in what it calls a “beta-test”—is forcing safety agencies and automakers to reassess the basic relationship between human drivers and their increasingly sophisticated cars... Consumer Reports experts believe that these two messages — your vehicle can drive itself, but you may need to take over the controls at a moment’s notice—create potential for driver confusion. It also increases the possibility that drivers using Autopilot may not be engaged enough to to react quickly to emergency situations. Many automakers are introducing this type of semi-autonomous technology into their vehicles at a rapid pace, but Tesla has been uniquely aggressive in its deployment. It is the only manufacturer that allows drivers to take their hands off the wheel for significant periods of time..."

For decades, Consumer Reports has reviewed, tested and rated both new and used vehicles to help drivers make informed decisions about purchases and repairs. It also tests and rates a wide variety of household appliances, electronics, telecommunications services (e.g., phone, cable TV, broadband), music streaming services, social networking sites, prepaid cards, credit monitoring services, and more. Consumer Reports owned and tested three Tesla vehicles: 2013 Model S 85, 2014 Model S P85D, and 2016 Model X 90D.

Laura MacCleery, the vice president of consumer policy and mobilization for Consumer Reports, said:

"By marketing their feature as ‘Autopilot,’ Tesla gives consumers a false sense of security... In the long run, advanced active safety technologies in vehicles could make our roads safer. But today, we're deeply concerned that consumers are being sold a pile of promises about unproven technology. 'Autopilot' can't actually drive the car, yet it allows consumers to have their hands off the steering wheel for minutes at a time. Tesla should disable automatic steering in its cars until it updates the program to verify that the driver's hands are on the wheel... Consumers should never be guinea pigs for vehicle safety 'beta' programs...”

Consumer Reports provided four recommendation for Tesla and its Autopilot feature, which include renaming it, halting beta test programs, and reprogramming the feature to require drivers to keep their hands on the steering wheel.

I agree. Beta testing features with business software (e.g., spreadsheets, word processing, VPN connections, etc.) and general software are entirely different from vehicles where lives are directly at risk. What are your opinions?

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