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Health App Developer Settles With FTC For Deceptive Marketing Claims

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a settlement agreement with Aura Labs, Inc. regarding alleged deceptive claims about its product: the Instant Blood Pressure App. Aura sold the app from at least June 2014 to at least July 31, 2015 at the Apple App Store and at the Google Play marketplace for $3.99 (or $4.99). Sales of the app totaled about $600,000 during this period. Ryan Archdeacon, the Chief Executive Officer and President of Aura, was named as a co-defendant in the suit.

The FTC alleged that the defendants violated the FTC Act. The complaint alleged deceptive marketing claims by Aura about its blood pressure app:

"Although Defendants represent that the Instant Blood Pressure App measures blood pressure as accurately as a traditional blood pressure cuff and serves as a replacement for a traditional cuff, in fact, studies demonstrate clinically and statistically significant deviations between the App’s measurements and those from a traditional blood pressure cuff."

iMedicalApps reported on March 2, 2016:

"A study presented today at the American Heart Association EPI & Lifestyle (AHA EPI) meeting in Phoenix has shown the shocking inaccuracy of a popular medical app, Instant Blood Pressure... Back in 2014, we raised concerns about the Instant Blood Pressure medical app which claimed to measure blood pressure just by having users put their finger over their smartphone’s camera and microphone over their heart presumably to use something akin to a pulse wave velocity... Dr. Timothy Plante, a fellow in general internal medicine at Johns Hopkins, led the study in which a total of 85 participants were recruited to test the accuracy of the Instant Blood Pressure app... When looking at individuals with low blood pressure or high blood pressure, they found that the Instant Blood Pressure app gave falsely normal values. In other words, someone with high blood pressure who used the app would be falsely reassured their blood pressure was normal... the sensitivity for high blood pressure was an abysmal 20%. These results, while striking, should not be surprising. This medical app had no publicly available validation data, despite reassurance from the developer back in 2014 that such data was forthcoming. The use of things like pulse wave velocity as surrogates for blood pressure has been tried and is fraught with problems..."

The FTC complaint listed the problems with an online review posted in the Apple App Store:

"Defendant Ryan Archdeacon left the following review of the Instant Blood Pressure App in the Apple App Store: "Great start by ARCHIE1986 – Version – 1.0.1 – Jun 11, 2014. This app is a breakthrough for blood pressure monitoring. There are some kinks to work out and you do need to pay close attention to the directions in order to get a successful measurement but all-in-all it’s a breakthrough product. For those having connection problems, consider trying again. I have experienced a similar issue. It is also great that the developer is committed to continual improvements. This is a great start!!!" That the review was left by the Chief Executive Officer and President of Aura was not disclosed to consumers and would materially affect the weight and credibility consumers assigned to the endorsement."

The complaint also cited problems with endorsements posted at Aura's web site:

"At times material to this Complaint, the What People Think portion of Defendants’ website contained three endorsements, including the following endorsement from relatives of Aura’s Chairman of the Board and co-founder Aaron Giroux: "This is such a smart idea that will benefit many of us in monitoring our health in an easy and convenient way." That the endorsement was left by relatives of Aura’s Chairman of the Board and co-founder Aaron Giroux was not disclosed to consumers and would materially affect the weight and credibility consumers assigned to the endorsement."

Terms of the settlement prohibit the defendants from making such unsubstantiated claims in the future, refund money to affected customers, reimburse plaintiffs for the costs of this lawsuit, and additional unspecified items. The FTC announcement also stated that the court order imposed:

"... a judgment of $595,945.27, which is suspended based on the defendants’ inability to pay. The full amount will become due, however, it they are later found to have misrepresented their financial condition."

Copies of the complaint are available at the FTC site and here (Adobe PDF). Kudos tot he FTC for its enforcement action. Product claims and endorsements should be truthful and accurate. And consumers still need to do research before purchase. Just because there's an app for it doesn't mean the results promised are guaranteed.

Got an unresolved problem with a product, service, or app? Consumers can file a complaint online with the FTC. What are your opinions of the Aura-FTC settlement? Of claims by app developers?

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