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Millions Of Android Smartphones And Apps Infected With New Malware, And Accounts Breached

Security researchers at Check Point Software Technologies have identified malware infecting an average of 13,000 Android phones daily. More than 1 million Android phones have already been infected. Researchers named the new malware "Gooligan." Check Point explained in a blog post:

"Our research exposes how the malware roots infected devices and steals authentication tokens that can be used to access data from Google Play, Gmail, Google Photos, Google Docs, G Suite, Google Drive, and more. Gooligan is a new variant of the Android malware campaign found by our researchers in the SnapPea app last year... Gooligan potentially affects devices on Android 4 (Jelly Bean, KitKat) and 5 (Lollipop), which is over 74% of in-market devices today. About 57% of these devices are located in Asia and about 9% are in Europe... We found traces of the Gooligan malware code in dozens of legitimate-looking apps on third-party Android app stores. These stores are an attractive alternative to Google Play because many of their apps are free, or offer free versions of paid apps. However, the security of these stores and the apps they sell aren’t always verified... Logs collected by Check Point researchers show that every day Gooligan installs at least 30,000 apps fraudulently on breached devices or over 2 million apps since the campaign began..."

Check Point chart about Gooligan malware. Click to view larger version This Telegraph UK news story listed 24 device manufacturers affected: Archos, Broadcom, Bullitt, CloudProject, Gigaset, HTC, Huaqin, Huawei, Intel, Lenovo, Pantech, Positivio, Samsung, Unitech, and others.The Check Point announcement listed more than 80 fake mobile apps infected with the Gooligan malware: Billiards, Daily Racing, Fingerprint unlock, Hip Good, Hot Photo, Memory Booster, Multifunction Flashlight, Music Cloud, Perfect Cleaner, PornClub, Puzzle Bubble-Pet Paradise, Sex Photo, Slots Mania, StopWatch, Touch Beauty, WiFi Enhancer, WiFi Master, and many more.

Check Point is working closely with the security team at Google. Adrian Ludwig, Google’s director of Android security, issued a statement:

"Since 2014, the Android security team has been tracking a family of malware called 'Ghost Push,' a vast collection of 'Potentially Harmful Apps' (PHAs) that generally fall into the category of 'hostile downloaders.' These apps are most often downloaded outside of Google Play and after they are installed, Ghost Push apps try to download other apps. For over two years, we’ve used Verify Apps to notify users before they install one of these PHAs and let them know if they’ve been affected by this family of malware... Several Ghost Push variants use publicly known vulnerabilities that are unpatched on older devices to gain privileges that allow them to install applications without user consent. In the last few weeks, we've worked closely with Check Point... to investigate and protect users from one of these variants. Nicknamed ‘Gooligan’, this variant used Google credentials on older versions of Android to generate fraudulent installs of other apps... Because Ghost Push only uses publicly known vulnerabilities, devices with up-to-date security patches have not been affected... We’ve taken multiple steps to protect devices and user accounts, and to disrupt the behavior of the malware as well. Verified Boot [https://source.android.com/security/verifiedboot/], which is enabled on newer devices including those that are compatible with Android 6.0, prevents modification of the system partition. Adopted from ChromeOS, Verified Boot makes it easy to remove Ghost Push... We’ve removed apps associated with the Ghost Push family from Google Play. We also removed apps that benefited from installs delivered by Ghost Push to reduce the incentive for this type of abuse in the future."

How the gooligan malware works by Check Point. Click to view larger version Android device users can also have their devices infected by phishing scams where criminals send text and email messages containing links to infected mobile apps. News about this latest malware comes at a time when some consumers are already worried about the security of Android devices.

Recently, there were reports of surveillance malware installed the firmware of some Android devices, and and the Quadrooter security flaw affecting 900 million Android phones and tablets. Last month, Google quietly dropped its ban on personally identifiable web tracking.

News about this latest malware also highlights the problems with Google's security model. We know from prior reports that manufacturers and wireless carriers don't provide OS updates for all Android phones. Hopefully, the introduction last month of the Pixel phone will address those problems. A better announcement would have also highlighted security improvements.

For the Gooligan malware, Check Point has develop a web site for consumers to determine if their Google account has already been compromised:  https://gooligan.checkpoint.com/. Check Point advised consumers with compromised accounts:

"1. A clean installation of an operating system on your mobile device is required (a process called “flashing”). As this is a complex process, we recommend powering off your device and approaching a certified technician, or your mobile service provider, to request that your device be “re-flashed.”

2. Change your Google account passwords immediately after this process."

A word to the wise: a) shop for apps only at trustworthy, reputable sites; b) download and install all operating-system security patches to protect your devices and your information; and c) avoid buying cheap phones that lack operating system software updates and security patches.

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