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High Tech Companies And A Muslim Registry

Since the Snowden disclosures in 2013, there have been plenty of news reports about how technology companies have assisted the U.S. government with surveillance programs. Some of these activities included surveillance programs by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) including innocent citizens, bulk phone calls metadata collection, warrantless searches by the NSA of citizen's phone calls and emails, facial image collection, identification of the best collaborator with NSA spying, fake cell phone towers (a/k/a 'stingrays') used by both federal government agencies and local police departments, and automated license plate readers to track drivers.

You may also remember, after Apple Computer's refusal to build a backdoor into its smartphones, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation bought a hacking tool from a third party. Several tech companies built the reform government surveillance site, while others actively pursue "Surveillance Capitalism" business goals.

During the 2016 political campaign, candidate (and now President Elect) Donald Trump said he would require all Muslims in the United States to register. Mr. Trump's words matter greatly given his lack of government experience. His words are all voters had to rely upon.

So, The Intercept asked several technology companies a key question about the next logical step: whether or not they are willing to help build and implement a Muslim registry:

"Every American corporation, from the largest conglomerate to the smallest firm, should ask itself right now: Will we do business with the Trump administration to further its most extreme, draconian goals? Or will we resist? This question is perhaps most important for the country’s tech companies, which are particularly valuable partners for a budding authoritarian."

The companies queried included IBM, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and others. What's been the response? Well, IBM focused on other areas of collaboration:

"Shortly after the election, IBM CEO Ginni Rometty wrote a personal letter to President-elect Trump in which she offered her congratulations, and more importantly, the services of her company. The six different areas she identified as potential business opportunities between a Trump White House and IBM were all inoffensive and more or less mundane, but showed a disturbing willingness to sell technology to a man with open interest in the ways in which technology can be abused: Mosque surveillance, a “virtual wall” with Mexico, shutting down portions of the internet on command, and so forth."

The response from many other companies has mostly been crickets. So far, only executives at Twitter have flatly refused, and included with its reply a link to its blog post about developer policies:

"Recent reports about Twitter data being used for surveillance, however, have caused us great concern. As a company, our commitment to social justice is core to our mission and well established. And our policies in this area are long-standing. Using Twitter’s Public APIs or data products to track or profile protesters and activists is absolutely unacceptable and prohibited.

To be clear: We prohibit developers using the Public APIs and Gnip data products from allowing law enforcement — or any other entity — to use Twitter data for surveillance purposes. Period. The fact that our Public APIs and Gnip data products provide information that people choose to share publicly does not change our policies in this area. And if developers violate our policies, we will take appropriate action, which can include suspension and termination of access to Twitter’s Public APIs and data products.

We have an internal process to review use cases for Gnip data products when new developers are onboarded and, where appropriate, we may reject all or part of a requested use case..."

Recently, a Trump-Pence supporter floated this trial balloon to justify such a registry:

"A prominent supporter of Donald J. Trump drew concern and condemnation from advocates for Muslims’ rights on Wednesday after he cited World War II-era Japanese-American internment camps as a “precedent” for an immigrant registry suggested by a member of the president-elect’s transition team. The supporter, Carl Higbie, a former spokesman for Great America PAC, an independent fund-raising committee, made the comments in an appearance on “The Kelly File” on Fox News...

“We’ve done it based on race, we’ve done it based on religion, we’ve done it based on region,” Mr. Higbie said. “We’ve done it with Iran back — back a while ago. We did it during World War II with Japanese.”

You can read the replies from nine technology companies at the Intercept site. Will other companies besides Twitter show that they have a spine? Whether or not such a registry ultimately violates the U.S. Constitution, we will definitely hear a lot more about this subject in the near future.

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