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Travelers Face Privacy Issues When Crossing Borders

If you travel for business, pleasure, or both then today's blog post will probably interest you. Wired Magazine reported:

"In the weeks since President Trump’s executive order ratcheted up the vetting of travelers from majority Muslim countries, or even people with Muslim-sounding names, passengers have experienced what appears from limited data to be a “spike” in cases of their devices being seized by customs officials. American Civil Liberties Union attorney Nathan Wessler says the group has heard scattered reports of customs agents demanding passwords to those devices, and even social media accounts."

Devices include smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Many consumers realize that relinquishing passwords to social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, etc.) discloses sensitive information not just about themselves, but also all of their friends, family, classmates, neighbors, and coworkers -- anyone they are connected with online. The "Bring Your Own Device" policies by many companies and employers means that employees (and contractors) can use their personal devices in the workplace and/or connected remotely to company networks. Those connected devices can easily divulge company trade secrets and other sensitive information when seized by Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) agents for analysis and data collection.

Plus, professionals such as attorneys and consultants are required to protect their clients' sensitive information. These professionals, who also must travel, require data security and privacy for business.

Wired also reported:

"In fact, US Customs and Border Protection has long considered US borders and airports a kind of loophole in the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment protections, one that allows them wide latitude to detain travelers and search their devices. For years, they’ve used that opportunity to hold border-crossers on the slightest suspicion, and demand access to their computers and phones with little formal cause or oversight.

Even citizens are far from immune. CBP detainees from journalists to filmmakers to security researchers have all had their devices taken out of their hands by agents."

For travelers wanting privacy, what are the options? Remain at home? This may not be an option for workers who must travel for business. Leave your devices at home? Again, impractical for many. The Wired article provided several suggestions, including:

"If customs officials do take your devices, don’t make their intrusion easy. Encrypt your hard drive with tools like BitLocker, TrueCrypt, or Apple’s Filevault, and choose a strong passphrase. On your phone—preferably an iPhone, given Apple’s track record of foiling federal cracking—set a strong PIN and disable Siri from the lockscreen by switching off “Access When Locked” under the Siri menu in Settings.

Remember also to turn your devices off before entering customs: Hard drive encryption tools only offer full protection when a computer is fully powered down. If you use TouchID, your iPhone is safest when it’s turned off, too..."

What are the consequences when travelers refuse to disclose passwords and encrpt devices? Ars Technica also explored the issues:

"... Ars spoke with several legal experts, and contacted CBP itself (which did not provide anything beyond previously-published policies). The short answer is: your device probably will be seized (or "detained" in CBP parlance), and you might be kept in physical detention—although no one seems to be sure exactly for how long.

An unnamed CBP spokesman told The New York Times on Tuesday that such electronic searches are extremely rare: he said that 4,444 cellphones and 320 other electronic devices were inspected in 2015, or 0.0012 percent of the 383 million arrivals (presuming that all those people had one device)... The most recent public document to date on this topic appears to be an August 2009 Department of Homeland Security paper entitled "Privacy Impact Assessment for the Border Searches of Electronic Devices." That document states that "For CBP, the detention of devices ordinarily should not exceed five (5) days, unless extenuating circumstances exist." The policy also states that CBP or Immigration and Customs Enforcement "may demand technical assistance, including translation or decryption," citing a federal law, 19 US Code Section 507."

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) collects stories from travelers who've been detained and had their devices seized. Clearly, we will hear a lot more in the future about these privacy issues. What are your opinions of this?

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