Consumers And The Features On Their Phones
Consumers And The Digital Devices In Their Smart Homes

Smart Mouse Traps: A Good Deal For Consumers?

Rentokil logo Rentokil, a pest control company, has introduced in the United Kingdom a new pest-control device for consumers wanting the latest WiFi technology. The company introduced ResiConnect, an Internet-connected mouse trap. A Rentokil representative explained to the Register UK newspaper:

“This is a trap that’s connected to the internet, essentially. Whereas there are other standard traps on the market that just catch and kill the mouse, that mouse can be caught in that trap for several weeks or several months. What this does is sends us a signal to notify us the trap has been activated, which allows us to respond... What this allows us to do is catch, kill and contain the mouse... and provide the best solution to the customer as well.”

Rentokil technician and vehicle Reportedly, the device sells for about £1,300, or about U.S. $1,300. Last summer, Rentokil Initial Plc announced a partnership with Google and PA Consulting Group (PA) to deploy globally the company's:

"... innovative digital pest control products and, in the future, to the development of ‘next generation’ services to offer customers new levels of proactive risk management against the threat of pest infestation... Rentokil has developed and begun to roll out its range of connected rodent control products particularly to customers in the tightly regulated food and pharmaceutical industries. In the field today, Rentokil has over 20,000 digital devices running in 12 countries which have now sent more than 3 million pieces of data.

The new digital pest control services use connected rodent devices with embedded sensors and mobile connectivity. The units communicate with Rentokil’s online ‘Command Centre’ and when they've caught a rodent, the technician is automatically alerted while customers are kept informed through myRentokil, the industry’s leading online portal... Built on Google’s Cloud Platform, and delivered by PA using Agile techniques, this technology is highly scalable and is now ready to be deployed more widely to existing and new customers from Q4 2016 and to other parts of the company..."

It seems that Rentokil is making available to consumers smart traps similar to those already deployed in the commercial market, such as fast food restaurants with multiple locations. Rentokil sells in the United States a device that uses radar to detect and capture mice. This raises the question: do consumers really need a smart mouse trap?

I have direct experience with mice. The building where I live is contains condominiums, and I have the responsibility to pay the condo association's monthly bills (e.g., water, insurance, and electricity), plus hire vendors and contractors, as needed, for repairs and maintenance. That includes pest control companies. Last week, our pest-control vendor deployed bait traps (e.g., poison and glue strips) in all units, plus the basement (with utilities and storage areas).

Obviously, owners of retail stores with multiple locations (e.g., fast food restaurants) would benefit from smart mouse traps. It seems cost-prohibitive to send (and pay for) technicians to visit each store and check multiple traps, while only selective traps would have caught rodents.

First, the benefit for residential customers sees marginal. Internet-connected mouse trap might appeal to squeamish consumers, who are afraid or unsure what to do, but it's hard to beat the convenience and low cost of a phone call. For our condo association, it was easy to know when a trap has caught a mouse. You heard the squeaking.

For us, the rodent removal process was easy. After a quick phone call the evening the mouse was caught, a pest-control technician arrived the next morning. The company sent a technician that was already in the area for nearby service calls. The technician removed the mouse stuck on a glue strip, checked, and re-baited several traps. That visit was included in the price we paid, and the phone call cost was negligible.

Second, the price seems expensive. The $1,600 price for a smart mouse trap equals about three years of what our condo association pays for pest control services.

Reliability and trust with smart devices are critical for consumers. A recent global study found that 44 percent of consumers are concerned about financial information theft via smart home devices, and 37 percent are concerned about identity theft.

Informed shoppers know that not all smart devices are built equally. Some have poor security features or lack software upgrades. These vulnerabilities create opportunities for bad guys to hack and infect consumers' home WiFi networks with malware to steal passwords and money, create spam, and use infected devices as part of DDoS attacks targeting businesses. (Yes, even the hosting service for this blog was targeted.) So, it is wise to understand any smart trap's software and security features before purchase.

What do you think? Are smart mouse traps worthwhile?

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