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WikiLeaks Claimed CIA Lost Control Of Its Hacking Tools For Phones And Smart TVs

Central Intelligence Agency logo A hacking division of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has collected an arsenal of hundreds of tools to control a variety of smartphones and smart televisions, including devices made by Apple, Google, Microsoft, Samsung and others. The Tuesday, March 7 press release by WikiLeaks claimed this lost arsenal during its release of:

"... 8,761 documents and files from an isolated, high-security network situated inside the CIA's Center for Cyber Intelligence in Langley, Virginia... Recently, the CIA lost control of the majority of its hacking arsenal including malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized "zero day" exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation. This extraordinary collection, which amounts to more than several hundred million lines of code, gives its possessor the entire hacking capacity of the CIA. The archive appears to have been circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive."

WikiLeaks used the code name "Vault 7" to identify this release of its first set of documents, and claimed its source for the documents was a former government hacker or contractor. It also said that its source wanted to encourage a public debate about the CIA's capabilities, which allegedly overlap with the National Security Agency (NSA) causing waste.

The announcement also included statements allegedly describing the CIA's capabilities:

"CIA malware and hacking tools are built by EDG (Engineering Development Group), a software development group within CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence), a department belonging to the CIA's DDI (Directorate for Digital Innovation)... By the end of 2016, the CIA's hacking division, which formally falls under the agency's Center for Cyber Intelligence (CCI), had over 5000 registered users and had produced more than a thousand hacking systems, trojans, viruses, and other "weaponized" malware... The CIA's Mobile Devices Branch (MDB) developed numerous attacks to remotely hack and control popular smart phones. Infected phones can be instructed to send the CIA the user's geolocation, audio and text communications as well as covertly activate the phone's camera and microphone. Despite iPhone's minority share (14.5%) of the global smart phone market in 2016, a specialized unit in the CIA's Mobile Development Branch produces malware to infest, control and exfiltrate data from iPhones and other Apple products running iOS, such as iPads."

CIA's capabilities reportedly include the "Weeping Angel" program:

"... developed by the CIA's Embedded Devices Branch (EDB), which infests smart TVs, transforming them into covert microphones, is surely its most emblematic realization. The attack against Samsung smart TVs was developed in cooperation with the United Kingdom's MI5/BTSS. After infestation, Weeping Angel places the target TV in a 'Fake-Off' mode, so that the owner falsely believes the TV is off when it is on. In 'Fake-Off' mode the TV operates as a bug, recording conversations in the room and sending them over the Internet to a covert CIA server."

Besides phones and smart televisions, WikiLeaks claimed the agency seeks to hack internet-connect autos and vehicles:

"As of October 2014 the CIA was also looking at infecting the vehicle control systems used by modern cars and trucks. The purpose of such control is not specified, but it would permit the CIA to engage in nearly undetectable assassinations."

No doubt that during the coming weeks and months security experts will analyze the documents for veracity. The whole situation is reminiscent of the disclosures in 2013 about broad surveillance programs by the National Security Agency (NSA). You can read more about yesterday's disclosures by WikiLeaks at the Guardian UK, CBS News, the McClatchy DC news wire, and at Consumer Reports.

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