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Wisconsin Employer To Offer Its Employees ID Microchip Implants

Microchip implant to be used by Three Square Market. Click to view larger version A Wisconsin company said it will offer to its employees starting August 1 the option of having microchip identification implants. The company, Three Square Market (32M), will allow employees with the microchip implants to make purchases in the employee break room, open locked doors, login to computers, use the copy machine, and related office tasks.

Each microchip, about the size of a grain of rice (see photo on the right), would be implanted under the skin in an employee's hand. The microchips use radio-frequency identification (RFID), a technology that's existed for a while and has been used in variety of devices: employee badges, payment cards, passports, package tracking, and more. Each microchip electronically stores identification information about the user, and uses near-field communications (NFC). Instead of swiping a payment card, employee badge, or their smartphone, instead the employee can unlock a device by waving their hand near a chip reader attached to that device. Purchases in the employee break room can be made by waving their hand near a self-serve kiosk.

Reportedly, 32M would be the first employer in the USA to microchip its employees. CBS News reported in April about Epicenter, a startup based in Sweden:

"The [implant] injections have become so popular that workers at Epicenter hold parties for those willing to get implanted... Epicenter, which is home to more than 100 companies and some 2,000 workers, began implanting workers in January 2015. Now, about 150 workers have [chip implants]... as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues. While biologically safe, the data generated by the chips can show how often an employee comes to work or what they buy. Unlike company swipe cards or smartphones, which can generate the same data, a person cannot easily separate themselves from the chip."

In an interview with Saint Paul-based KSTP, Todd Westby, the Chief Executive Officer at 32M described the optional microchip program as:

"... the next thing that's inevitably going to happen, and we want to be a part of it..."

To implement its microchip implant program, 32M has partnered with Sweden-based BioHax International. Westby explained in a company announcement:

"Eventually, this technology will become standardized allowing you to use this as your passport, public transit, all purchasing opportunities... We see chip technology as the next evolution in payment systems, much like micro markets have steadily replaced vending machines... it is important that 32M continues leading the way with advancements such as chip implants..."

"Mico markets" are small stores located within employers' offices; typically the break rooms where employees relax and/or purchase food. 32M estimates 20,000 micro markets nationwide in the USA. According to its website, the company serves markets in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. 32M believes that micro markets, aided by chip implants and self-serve kiosk, offer employers greater employee productivity with lower costs.

Yes, the chip implants are similar to the chip implants many pet owners have inserted to identify their dogs or cats. 32M expects 50 employees to enroll in its chip implant program.

Reportedly, companies in Belgium and Sweden already use chip implants to identify employees. 32M's announcement did not list the data elements each employee's microchip would contain, nor whether the data in the microchips would be encrypted. Historically, unencrypted data stored by RFID technology has been vulnerable to skimming attacks by criminals using portable or hand-held RFID readers. Stolen information would be used to cloned devices to commit identity theft and fraud.

Some states, such as Washington and California, passed anti-skimming laws. Prior government-industry workshops about RFID usage focused upon consumer products, and not employment concerns. Earlier this year, lawmakers in Nevada introduced legislation making it illegal to require employees to accept microchip implants.

A BBC News reporter discussed in 2015 what it is like to be "chipped." And as CBS News reported:

"... hackers could conceivably gain huge swathes of information from embedded microchips. The ethical dilemmas will become bigger the more sophisticated the microchips become. The data that you could possibly get from a chip that is embedded in your body is a lot different from the data that you can get from a smartphone..."

Example: employers installing RFID readers for employees to unlock bathrooms means employers can track when, where, how often, and the duration employees use bathrooms. How does that sound?

Hopefully, future announcements by 32M will discuss the security features and protections. What are your opinions? Are you willing to be an office cyborg? Should employees have a choice, or should employers be able to force their employees to accept microchip implants? How do you feel about your employer tracking what you eat and drink via purchases with your chip implant?

Many employers publish social media policies covering what employees should (shouldn't, or can't) publish online. Should employers have microchip implant policies, too? If so, what should these policies state?

Comments

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Chanson de Roland

This placing of ID microchips in humans is an egregious affront to human dignity, privacy, and autonomy. Once inserted, theses chips would constitute a national ID card, and, as the Editor discusses, supra, present threats to security, privacy, identity theft, political rights of dissent, and autonomy, which would be limited only by the imagination and the pervasiveness of the network that such chips communicate with.

And those evils arise just from present microchip technology. As discussed in the report, supra, advances in the capabilities of these chips will permit them to monitor the biological status and condition of our bodies, and even certain activities of our bodies.

Is it that difficult to see the horrors that allowing people to be chipped make possible?

And, as for this chipping being voluntary, once this implanted microchip technology is widely adopted by employers, what employee will be able to say no with the certain negative implications that would have for their careers?

It is one thing for a despotic governments to chip their citizens, and, in the future, many of those with the means to do so certainly will, but for us to voluntarily exchange our privacy, dignity, and freedom to be chipped like dogs in exchange for purchases at the minimart or some theatre is to value our freedom, dignity, and privacy so little that we certainly don’t deserve them.

George

Update:

About 41 employees have opted for the implant. See:
https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/305197/41-wisconsin-company-employees-have-microchips-imp.html

I rechecked 32M's site. It posted later on July 25 (after my blog post was published) that the data on the microchips is encrypted. Each microchip contains a unique serial number, and the software associates that number to the employee to allow the function authorized (e.g., open locked door, operate copy machine, purchase items in break room, etc.). Employees not wanting the implant can choose instead an RFID wristband or an RFID/Near-Field Communication Smart Ring.

George
Editor
http://ivebeenmugged.typepad.com

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