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Real Scams, Real Cons and Fake Law Enforcement

[Editor's Note: Today's guest post is by Arkady Bukh of Bukh & Associates, PLLC which specializes in criminal law, family law, and several areas of civil law. Aware consumers know how to recognize scams.]

By Arkady Bukh, Esq.

A man in Nigeria died recently. When the coroner went to the home for the body, he found $25 BILLION dollars. Apparently, the decedent had been trying to give away his money for years, but no one answered his email.

If you've been on the Internet for over, say, one-hour, you recognize the source for that joke. The Nigerian email scam is so infamous it's been given its own, easily recognizable, name: The Nigerian Email Scam.

Despite scams and cons being popular online, they're not confined to the virtual world. They crop up in the real world, too. Often, in unexpected ways.

Pennsylvania Teen Tries to Scam and It Doesn’t Go Well at Home
Police in Westtown Township nabbed a teenage boy in March after linking the kid to a scam involving fake traffic tickets. The fraudulent fines were placed in mailboxes at four homes. Each fake ticket claimed the homeowners' vehicle was captured on camera speeding in nearby West Chester. An accompanying note asked for $96 to be left in the mailbox.

"It does look real," said Jackie McGlone, a West Chester resident.

Detectives have found the photographs of the vehicle's' plates were taken while the car was parked in their owner's' driveway and unoccupied.

Police tracked the 16-year old boy, who lives in the area, by a tip phoned in by the teenager's dad.

The teen's father found some notifications waiting to be mailed and called the police. Charges are pending.

Truckers Lose Big Money in Oregon
In 2013, an Oregon-based scam dug into the pockets of truck drivers with automated calls telling them to pay their unpaid traffic tickets using re-loadable debit cards — or face a penalty.

The caller identified himself as, "Alex James Murphy of the Oregon State Police," and informed drivers of a bench warrant for an outstanding speeding ticket. To pay, the drivers were told to buy re-loadable prepaid cards through Green Dot MoneyPak, put $154 on the card, and then call a second phone number to provide the card information.

If the driver does all that, they'll find out there was never an unpaid speeding ticket and their $154 has hit the road. The scam, which occasionally crops up in difference places, first appeared on the radar in November 2012 and had gone through a few variations since.

An offshoot which also relies on confusing the lines between a con artist and legitimate law enforcement agencies is the “Support Your Sheriff” sticker scam. The Federal Trade Commission's website has a page warning consumers about cons which play on citizens' desire to help support local law enforcement.

Fake Police
A vehicle which appears to be an unmarked police car pulls you over. The ‘officer' says you are about to be handed a large fine and see points added to your driver's license. "However," says the supposed-cop, "you can avoid this by paying a smaller fee, up front, in cash."

That's not a tactic used by legitimate law enforcement agencies anywhere. Real cops want to make sure the law is obeyed and not about a discount if a speeder pays on the front end. Legitimate cops will issue a real ticket that must be paid in person, or mail, at the department.

If in doubt, request another officer to come to the scene. It's your right.

Phishing Scam
Someone receives an e-mail message claiming them they are guilty of a traffic violation. A wise person will delete the email immediately. Any email saying you owe money for traffic tickets is a phishing scam.

Usually, the email says the person needs to pay for the traffic citation right now. The e-mail includes a link where the individual to find details. The link often contains a computer virus, and can redirect the user to a phishing page meant to request personal information from the user.

Buy a Sticker and Get Out of Jail Free
Scammers have called individuals at work and home at claiming the local Department of Public Safety (DPS) offers decals for autos with the DPS logo to waive their next traffic ticket.

The caller instructs the person to place the sticker next to the car's license plate. To get the sticker, the vehicle owner must pay $10. Many persons fall for the scam as $10 is smaller than any traffic ticket issued after 1946.

If you get a traffic citation, you broke the law. You will pay for that. There is no such thing as a law enforcement sticker which gets you one free traffic ticket.

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