National Parks: Buy Your Senior Pass Before the Price Hike
Celebrating 10 Years Online!

Robotic Vacuum Cleaner Maker To Resell Data Collected Of Customers' Home Interiors

iRobot Roomba autonomous vacuum. Click to view larger image Do you use a robovac -- an autonomous WiFi-connected robotic vacuum cleaner -- in your home? Do you use the mobile app to control your robovac?

Gizmodo reports that iRobot, the maker of the Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner, plans to resell maps generated by robovacs to other smart-home device manufacturers:

"While it may seem like the information that a Roomba could gather is minimal, there’s a lot to be gleaned from the maps it’s constantly updating. It knows the floor plan of your home, the basic shape of everything on your floor, what areas require the most maintenance, and how often you require cleaning cycles, along with many other data points... If a company like Amazon, for example, wanted to improve its Echo smart speaker, the Roomba’s mapping info could certainly help out. Spatial mapping could improve audio performance by taking advantage of the room’s acoustics. Do you have a large room that’s practically empty? Targeted furniture ads might be quite effective. The laser and camera sensors would paint a nice portrait for lighting needs..."

Think about it. The maps identify whether you have one, none, or several sofas -- or other large furniture items. The maps also identify the size, square footage, of your home and the number of rooms. Got a hairy pet? If your robovac needs more frequently cleaning, that data is collected, too.

One can easily confirm this by reading the iRobot Privacy Policy:

"... Some of our Robots are equipped with smart technology which allows the Robots to transmit data wirelessly to the Service. For example, the Robot could collect and transmit information about the Robot’s function and use statistics, such as battery life and health, number of missions, the device identifier, and location mapping. When you register your Robot with the online App, the App will collect and maintain information about the Robot and/or App usage, feature usage, in-App transactions, technical specifications, crashes, and other information about how you use your Robot and the product App. We also collect information provided during set-up.

We use this information to collect and analyze statistics and usage data, diagnose and fix technology problems, enhance device performance, and improve user experience. We may use this information to provide you personalized communications, including marketing and promotional messages... Our Robots do not transmit this information unless you register your device online and connect to WiFi, Bluetooth, or connect to the internet via another method."

Everything seems focused upon making your robovac perform optimally. Seems. Read on:

"When you access the Service by or through a mobile device, we may receive or collect and store a unique identification numbers associated with your device or our mobile application (including, for example, a UDID, Unique ID for Advertisers (“IDFA”), Google Ad ID, or Windows Advertising ID), mobile carrier, device type, model and manufacturer, mobile device operating system brand and model, phone number, and, depending on your mobile device settings, your geographical location data, including GPS coordinates (e.g. latitude and/or longitude) or similar information regarding the location of your mobile device..."

Use the mobile app and your robovac's unique ID number can easily be associated with other data describing you, where you live, and your lifestyle. Valuable stuff.

Another important section of the privacy policy:

"We may share your personal information in the instances described... i) Other companies owned by or under common ownership as iRobot, which also includes our subsidiaries or our ultimate holding company and any subsidiaries it owns. These companies will use your personal information in the same way as we can under this Policy; ii) Third party vendors, affiliates, and other service providers that perform services on our behalf, solely in order to carry out their work for us, which may include identifying and serving targeted advertisements, providing e-commerce services, content or service fulfillment, billing, web site operation, payment processing and authorization, customer service, or providing analytics services.

Well, there seems to be plenty of wiggle room for iRobot to resell your data. And, that assumes it doesn't change its privacy policy to make resales easier. Note: this is not legal advice. If you want legal advice, hire an attorney. I am not an attorney.

The policy goes on to describe customers' choices with stopping or opting out of data collection programs for some data elements. If you've read that, then you know how to opt out of as much as possible of the data collection.

The whole affairs highlights the fact that the data collected from different brands of smart devices in consumers' homes can be combined, massaged, and analyzed in new ways -- ways in which probably are not apparent to consumers, and which reveal more about you than often desired. And, the whole affair is a reminder to read privacy policies before purchases. Know what valuable personal data you will give away for convenience.

Eyes wide open.

Got an autonomous robotic lawn mower? You might re-read the privacy policy for that, too.

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Chanson de Roland

Why does a vacuum cleaner need to collect this type of information about our homes to clean them? The answer is that it doesn’t need to collect this information to clean our homes or otherwise benefit us, unless you consider advertising or a third party collecting information about your home for its purposes to be a benefit to you.

The remedy for this is for the relevant branches of government to protect us by regulating to prohibit this data collection and for the courts to finally acknowledge that information being collected is our property and is not the property of the person who merely collects it.

To do this, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) should forbid the makers of these devices from collecting any information that is not essential to their function, given what’s practical for the state of the art for the technology.

And the courts should make the easy and implied step of declaring that the information that we author through our acts is ours. That is implicit in iRobot’s agreement, supra, for if the information, or data, were iRobot’s property, it would not have to ask our permission to collect and use it.

So until the Congress, the FTC, and the courts act, if ever, we, each of us, have the simple and easy expedients of: (1) using an old fashioned vacuum cleaner, without the robotics; (2) declining to accede to iRobot’s license to collect and use our information about our homes; and/or (3) do not get and install iRobot’s app on your computing devices.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)