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Hacked Amazon Echo Converted Into Always-On Surveillance Device

Image of amazon Echo Wired reported how a white-hat hacker provided proof-of-concept that a popular voice-activated, smart home speaker could easily be hacked:

"... British security researcher Mark Barnes detailed a technique anyone can use to install malware on an Amazon Echo, along with his proof-of-concept code that would silently stream audio from the hacked device to his own faraway server. The technique requires gaining physical access to the target Echo, and it works only on devices sold before 2017. But there's no software fix for older units, Barnes warns, and the attack can be performed without leaving any sign of hardware intrusion."

Amazon sells both new and refurbished speakers. Newer models also include cameras. All are probably high-value targets of hackers and spy agencies.

Reportedly, Amazon has fixed the security vulnerability in newer (2017) models. The company advises customers to keep the software on their speakers current, and purchase speakers from trusted retailers. However (bold emphasis added):

"... Barnes agrees that his work should serve as a warning that Echo devices bought from someone other than Amazon—like a secondhand seller—could be compromised. But he also points out that, contrary to the implication of the company's statement, no software update will protect earlier versions of the Echo, since the problem is in the physical connection its hardware exposes.

Instead, he says that people should think twice about the security risks of using an Echo in public or semipublic places, like plans for the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas to put an Echo in every room."

Voice-activated smart speakers in hotel lobbies and rooms. Nothing could go wrong with that. All it takes is a prior guest, or criminal posing as a hotel staff or cleaning person, to hack and compromise one or more older devices. Will hotels install the newer devices? Will they inform guests?

For guaranteed privacy, it seems hotel guests may soon have to simply turn off (or mute) smart speakers, smart televisions, and personal assistants. Convenience definitely has its price (e.g., security and privacy). What do you think?

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