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Bungled Software Update Renders Customers' Smart Door Locks Inoperable

Image of Lockstate RemoteLock 6i device. Click to view larger version A bungled software update by Lockstate, maker of WiFi-enabled door locks, rendered many customers' locks inoperable -- or "bricked." Lockstate notified affected customers in this letter:

"Dear Lockstate Customer,
We notified you earlier today of a potential issue with your LS6i lock. We are sorry to inform you about some unfortunate news. Your lock is among a small subset of locks that had a fatal error rendering it inoperable. After a software update was sent to your lock, it failed to reconnect to our web service making a remote fix impossible...

Many AirBnb operators use smart locks by Lockstate to secure their properties. In its website, Lockstate promotes the LS6i lock as:

"... perfect for your rental property, home or office use. This robust WiFi enabled door lock allows users to lock or unlock doors remotely, know when people unlock your door, and even receive text alerts when codes are used. Issue new codes or delete codes from your computer or phone. Even give temporary codes to guests or office personnel."

Reportedly, about 200 Airbnb customers were affected. The company said 500 locks were affected. ArsTechnica explained how the bungled software update happened:

"The failure occurred last Monday when LockState mistakenly sent some 6i lock models a firmware update developed for 7i locks. The update left earlier 6i models unable to be locked and no longer able to receive over-the-air updates."

Some affected customers shared their frustrations on the company's Twitter page. Lockstate said the affected locks can still be operated with physical keys. While that is helpful, it isn't a solution since customers rely upon the remote features. Affected customers have two repair options: 1) return the back portion of the lock (repair time about 5 to 7 days), or 2) request a replace (response time about 14 to 18 days).

The whole situation seems to be another reminder of the limitations when companies design smart devices with security updates delivered via firmware. And, a better disclosure letter by Lockstate would have explained corrections to internal systems and managerial processes, so this doesn't happen again during another software update.

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