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Wells Fargo: 1.4 Million More Fake Accounts Found By Latest Investigation

Wells Fargo logo Just before the long holiday weekend, Wells Fargo Bank announced in an August 31 news release the latest results of a third-party investigation into its retail bank account practices since 2009:

"The original account analysis reviewed 93.5 million current and former customer accounts opened in an approximately four and half year time period – from May 2011 through mid-2015 – and identified approximately 2.1 million potentially unauthorized accounts. The expanded analysis reviewed more than 165 million retail banking accounts opened over a nearly eight-year period – from January 2009 through September 2016 – and identified a new total of approximately 3.5 million potentially unauthorized consumer and small business accounts... In connection with these 3.5 million potentially unauthorized accounts, approximately 190,000 accounts incurred fees and charges, up from 130,000 previously identified accounts that incurred fees and charges, and Wells Fargo will provide a total of $2.8 million in additional refunds and credits on top of the $3.3 million previously refunded as a result of the original account review... a review of online bill pay services, as required by the Sept. 8, 2016, consent orders... the analysis identified approximately 528,000 potentially unauthorized online bill pay enrollments and Wells Fargo will refund $910,000 to customers who incurred fees or charges. "

To summarize: the latest investigation went two years further back in time, found about 1.4 million more phony accounts, found more customers affected by unauthorized bank accounts, and found possibly more phony online bill-pay enrollments. In a settlement agreement last year with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Wells Fargo paid a $185 million fine last year for alleged unlawful sales practices with the number of phony accounts known then.

Of course, the bank tried a different spin in its news release about the investigation's findings:

"... the completion of its previously announced expanded third-party review of retail banking accounts dating back to the beginning of 2009. Combined with a recent class action settlement and ongoing broad customer outreach and complaint resolution, the completion of the analysis further paves the way for making things right for Wells Fargo customers who may have been harmed by unacceptable retail sales practices."

Yeah, right. That sounds like some wayward teenager wanting praise for providing a complete list of damage to the family car which they didn't have permission nor a license to drive in the first place.

Much of Wall Street has seen through the spin. Some financial experts advise investors to sell Well Fargo shares and buy other banks' shares instead. One of the world's largest fund managers withheld support for three of the bank's directors. Some news headlines focused on the growing estimate of phony accounts uncovered. MSN Money listed reasons why the bank may not survive the growing scandal.

There is plenty of bad news. The Los Angels Times reported a lawsuit by former bank executives who claimed they were scapegoated and fired earlier this year after reporting unethical sales practices. News reports broke earlier this month about alleged insurance abuses of the bank's auto-loan customers.

Well, we now know more about the bank's retail banking practices. The latest announcement makes one wonder, a) how much damage one bank can do, and b) how many more phony accounts would have been uncovered if the investigation started before 2009. What are your opinions?

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