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Mystery Package Scam Operating on Amazon Site. What It Is, The Implications, And Advice For Victims

Amazon logo Last fall, a couple living in a Boston suburb started receiving packages they didn't order from Amazon, the popular online retailer. The Boston Globe reported that the couple living in Acton, Massachusetts:

"... contacted Amazon, only to be told that the merchandise was paid for with a gift card. No sender’s name, no address. While they’ve never been charged for anything, they fear they are being used in a scam... The first package from Amazon landed on Mike and Kelly Gallivan’s front porch in October. And they have continued to arrive, packed with plastic fans, phone chargers, and other cheap stuff, at a rate of one or two a week."

The packages were delivered to the intended recipient. Nobody knows who sent the items: wireless chargers, a high-intensity flashlight, a Bluetooth speaker, a computer vacuum cleaner, LED tent lamps, USB cables, and more. After receiving 25 packages since October, the couple now wants it to stop. What seemed funny at first, is now a nuisance.

The Gallivans are not alone. CBC News reported that students at several universities in Canada have also received mystery packages containing a variety of items they didn't order:

"The items come in Amazon packaging, but there's no indication who's ordering the goods from the online retail giant. "We're definitely confused by it," said Shawn Wiskar, University of Regina Students' Union vice-president of student affairs. His student union has received about 15 anonymous packages from Amazon since late November, many of which contained multiple items. Products sent so far include iPad cases, a kitchen scale and a "fleshlight" — a male sex toy in the shape of a flashlight... Six other university student unions — Dalhousie in Halifax; St. Francis Xavier in Antigonish (Nova Scotia); Ryerson in Toronto; Wilfrid Laurier in Waterloo, Ontario; Royal Roads in Victoria; and the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg — have also confirmed that they've been receiving mysterious Amazon packages since the fall."

Experts speculate that the mystery packages were sent by fraudsters trying to game the retailer's review system. Consumers buy products on Amazon.com either directly from the retailer or from independent sellers listed on the site. The Boston Globe explained:

"Here’s how two experts who used to work for Amazon, James Thomson and Chris McCabe, say it probably works: A seller trying to prop up a product would set up a phony e-mail account that would be used to establish an Amazon account. Then the seller would purchase merchandise with a gift card — no identifying information there — and send it to a random person, in this case the Gallivans. Then, the phantom seller, who controls the “buyer’s” e-mail account, writes glowing reviews of the product, thus boosting the Amazon ranking of the product."

If true, then there probably are a significant number of bogus reviews on the Amazon site. The Boston Globe's news item also suggested that a data breach within a seller's firm might have provided scammers with valid mailing addresses:

"How did Mike, to whom the packages are addressed, get drawn into this? On occasion he’s ordered stuff on Amazon and received it directly from a manufacturer, once from China. That manufacturer or some affiliate may have scooped Mike’s name and address."

If true, then that highlights the downside of offshore outsourcing, where other countries don't mandate data breach disclosures. Earlier in 2017, a resident of Queens in New York City received packages with products she didn't order:

"... All she knows is that the sender is some guy named Kevin who uses Amazon gift cards... And she’s reported the packages to the NYPD, the FBI and the Better Business Bureau since Amazon hasn’t made the deliveries stop."

In that news report, a security expert speculated that criminals were testing stolen debit- and gift-card numbers. Did a seller have a data breach which went unreported? Lots of questions and few answers.

Security experts advise consumers to report packages they didn't order to various law enforcement and agencies, as the Queens resident did. Ultimately, her deliveries stopped, but not for the Gallivans.

Amazon has been unable to identify the perpetrators. At press time, a search of Amazon's Help and Customer Service site section failed to find content helping consumers victimized by this scam.

Perhaps, it is time for law enforcement and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to step in. Regardless, we consumers will probably hear more news in the future about this scam.

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