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FBI Warns Sophisticated Malware Targets Wireless Routers In Homes And Small Businesses

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) issued a Public Service Announcement (PSA) warning consumers and small businesses that "foreign cyber actors" have targeted their wireless routers. The May 25th PSA explained the threat:

"The actors used VPNFilter malware to target small office and home office routers. The malware is able to perform multiple functions, including possible information collection, device exploitation, and blocking network traffic... The malware targets routers produced by several manufacturers and network-attached storage devices by at least one manufacturer... VPNFilter is able to render small office and home office routers inoperable. The malware can potentially also collect information passing through the router. Detection and analysis of the malware’s network activity is complicated by its use of encryption and misattributable networks."

The "VPN" acronym usually refers to a Virtual Private Network. Why use the VPNfilter name for a sophisticated computer virus? Wired magazine explained:

"... the versatile code is designed to serve as a multipurpose spy tool, and also creates a network of hijacked routers that serve as unwitting VPNs, potentially hiding the attackers' origin as they carry out other malicious activities."

The FBI's PSA advised users to, a) reboot (e.g., turn off and then back on) their routers; b) disable remote management features which attackers could take over to gain access; and c) update their routers with the latest software and security patches. For routers purchased independently, security experts advise consumers to contact the router manufacturer's tech support or customer service site.

For routers leased or purchased from an internet service providers (ISP), consumers should contact their ISP's customer service or technical department for software updates and security patches. Example: the Verizon FiOS forums site section lists the brands and models affected by the VPNfilter malware, since several manufacturers produce routers for the Verizon FiOS service.

It is critical for consumers to heed this PSA. The New York Times reported:

"An analysis by Talos, the threat intelligence division for the tech giant Cisco, estimated that at least 500,000 routers in at least 54 countries had been infected by the [VPNfilter] malware... A global network of hundreds of thousands of routers is already under the control of the Sofacy Group, the Justice Department said last week. That group, which is also known as A.P.T. 28 and Fancy Bear and believed to be directed by Russia’s military intelligence agency... To disrupt the Sofacy network, the Justice Department sought and received permission to seize the web domain toknowall.com, which it said was a critical part of the malware’s “command-and-control infrastructure.” Now that the domain is under F.B.I. control, any attempts by the malware to reinfect a compromised router will be bounced to an F.B.I. server that can record the I.P. address of the affected device..."

Readers wanting technical details about VPNfilter, should read the Talos Intelligence blog post.

When consumers contact their ISP about router software updates, it is wise to also inquire about security patches for the Krack malware, which the bad actors have used recently. Example: the Verizon site also provides information about the Krack malware.

The latest threat provides several strong reminders:

  1. The conveniences of wireless internet connectivity which consumers demand and enjoy, also benefits the bad guys,
  2. The bad guys are persistent and will continue to target internet-connected devices with weak or no protection, including devices consumers fail to protect,
  3. Wireless benefits come with a responsibility for consumers to shop wisely for internet-connected devices featuring easy, continual software updates and security patches. Otherwise, that shiny new device you recently purchased is nothing more than an expensive "brick," and
  4. Manufacturers have a responsibility to provide consumers with easy, continual software updates and security patches for the internet-connected devices they sell.

What are your opinions of the VPNfilter malware? What has been your experience with securing your wireless home router?

Comments

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iKomrad

The current trend in home technology is to not rent routers from ISP's , but to instead purchased your own. At the same time, the old "all-in-one" routers that also did things such as Wireless Access Point, backup system, switch, dns server, etc are being replaced by dedicated devices by companies such as Ubiquiti Networks and Netgate.

These products are of much higher quality and are rigorously tested by techies across the globe. In fact, I don' t know anyone who uses network equipment from their ISP/Cable provide . They either have purchased the products I mentioned above, or have loaded custom firmware on consumer product to give it advanced routing , wifi, security , and other features.

I'd that devices that are vulnerable to threats such as VPNFilter are part of the legacy group of products, and the security threat is decreasing as consumers migrate to more robust, secure equipment.

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