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New Phone-Based Phishing Scams Can Trick Even Experts. How You Can Avoid Getting Duped

Beware, phone scams are more sophisticated. The pitches are so slick that even some technology experts who know better were tricked into disclosing sensitive personal and payment information. Some phone scams include human callers (called "phishing"), while others include a mix of humans and computer automation (called "vishing").

The Krebs On Security blog listed several examples. Here's one:

"Matt Haughey is the creator of the community Weblog MetaFilter... Haughey banks at a small Portland credit union, and last week he got a call on his mobile phone from an 800-number that matched the number his credit union uses. Actually, he got three calls from the same number in rapid succession. He ignored the first two, letting them both go to voicemail. But he picked up on the third call, thinking it must be something urgent and important. After all, his credit union had rarely ever called him.

Haughey said he was greeted by a female voice who explained that the credit union had blocked two phony-looking charges in Ohio made to his debit/ATM card. She proceeded to then read him the last four digits of the card that was currently in his wallet. It checked out. Haughey told the lady that he would need a replacement card immediately... Without missing a beat, the caller said he could keep his card and that the credit union would simply block any future charges that weren’t made in either Oregon or California. This struck Haughey as a bit off. Why would the bank say they were freezing his card but then say they could keep it open for his upcoming trip?"

Maybe that struck you as odd, too. Against his better judgment, Haughey continued the phone call and didn't hang up. The caller knew his home address and asked him to verify his mother's maiden name, the 3-digit security code on the back of his card, and his PIN number. Those requests were more clues, too. The bank should know this information.

Like most people, Haughey thought that it was his bank trying to be helpful. Finally, he hung up and called his bank directly. That's when he learned it was a scam. His bank hadn't called.

This example provides several lessons for consumers:

  1. Scam artists are persistent. They will keep calling hoping you'll give in and answer the phone calls.
  2. Scam artists are well armed. Thanks to the recent multitude of massive corporate data breaches (like this one, this one, this one, this one, and/or this one), the bad guys have probably acquired plenty of stolen personal and payment information about consumers. Criminals also buy, sell, and trade stolen data on the dark web. Using the same technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, open-source online tools) which the good guys use, the bad guys will "spoof" or fake valid phone numbers to pretend to be your bank or financial institution.
  3. A bit of skepticism is healthy. We've all been taught to be polite and to answer the phone when it rings. Scam artists try to exploit this habit. Experts advise consumers to hang up on robocalls. Even if the Caller ID feature on your phone displays a familiar number, hang up and call your bank or financial institution directly. Their phone number is conveniently listed on the back of your credit/debit card. Ask your bank if they called. They probably didn't.
  4. Learn how to spot robocalls acting like humans. If you're curious and have the time, ask a simple question like, "How's the weather where you live?" If the caller ignores your question or provides a canned response, like "I don't have that information" or "I'm sorry. Can you repeat that," then it's probably a robocall. Hang up.
  5. Know scam artists' pitch. It's all about money. They will pretend to be your bank, financial institution, phone company, and/or computer company. (Yes, online scammers have a profile.) Similar to phishing emails, phone scams often include a sense of urgency. They want you to act now... in the moment. Wise consumers do product research and comparison shop before making purchase decisions. The "haste makes waste" advice your parents told you as a youth still applies.

You now know more, so you won't get duped by phone scams.

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