161 posts categorized "Breach Notification" Feed

Update: All Yahoo Accounts Hacked During Its Data Breach in 2013

Verizon Oath logo Yahoo, now within Verizon's Oath business unit, announced on Tuesday an update in the the number of accounts hacked during its massive data breach in 2013. The announcement stated:

"... [Yahoo] is providing notice to additional user accounts affected by an August 2013 data theft previously disclosed by the company on December 14, 2016. At that time, Yahoo disclosed that more than one billion of the approximately three billion accounts existing in 2013 had likely been affected... Subsequent to Yahoo's acquisition by Verizon, and during integration, the company recently obtained new intelligence and now believes, following an investigation with the assistance of outside forensic experts, that all Yahoo user accounts were affected by the August 2013 theft... Yahoo is sending email notifications to the additional affected user accounts..."

That's 3 billion accounts hacked! It almost boggles the mind. Consumers with questions should also visit the Yahoo 2013 Account Security Page which has been updated with information released this week. Key information about the breach and consumers' data stolen:

"On December 14, 2016, Yahoo announced that, based on its analysis of data files provided by law enforcement, the company believed that an unauthorized party stole data associated with certain user accounts in August 2013... the stolen user account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords and, in some cases, encrypted or un-encrypted security questions and answers. The investigation indicates that the information that was stolen did not include passwords in clear text, payment card data, or bank account information. Payment card data and bank account information are not stored in the system the company believes was affected... No additional notifications regarding the cookie forging activity are being sent in connection with this update..."

Obviously, affected users should change their passwords, security questions, and security answers -- if they haven't already. Some consumers are confused about whether e-mail breach announcements they have received are authentic and truly from Yahoo. The tech company advised:

"... email from Yahoo about this issue will display the Yahoo icon Purple Y icon when viewed through the Yahoo website or Yahoo Mail app. Importantly, the email does not ask you to click on any links or contain attachments and does not request your personal information. If an email you received about this issue prompts you to click on a link, download an attachment, or asks you for information, the email was not sent by Yahoo and may be an attempt to steal your personal information. Avoid clicking on links or downloading attachments from such suspicious emails."

Uncertain users should also check the official Yahoo breach notices by country. In June of this year, Verizon completed its acquisition of Yahoo! Inc. and announced then:

"Verizon has combined these assets with its existing AOL business to create a new subsidiary, Oath, a diverse house of more than 50 media and technology brands that engages more than a billion people around the world. The Oath portfolio includes HuffPost, Yahoo Sports, AOL.com, MAKERS, Tumblr, BUILD Studios, Yahoo Finance, Yahoo Mail and more, with a mission to build brands people love."

Reportedly, the Oath portfolio will include products, services, and apps covering content partnerships, virtual reality (VR), artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT).

In March of this year, the U.S. Department of Justice announced the indictment by a grand jury of four defendants, including two officers of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), for computer hacking, economic espionage and other criminal offenses related to the massive hack of millions of Yahoo webmail accounts.

The announcement this week by Yahoo is a reminder of the importance of post-breach investigations and how long these investigations can take to uncover complete details about the hack. It is unwise to assume that everything is known at the time of the initial breach notification. It is also unwise to assume that companies can immediately improve their data security and systems after a massive breach.


Equifax: 2.5 Million More Persons Affected By Massive Data Breach

Equifax logo Equifax disclosed on Monday, October 2, that 2.5 more persons than originally announced were affected by its massive data breach earlier this year. According to the Equifax breach website:

"... cybersecurity firm Mandiant has completed the forensic portion of its investigation of the cybersecurity incident disclosed on September 7 to finalize the consumers potentially impacted... The completed review determined that approximately 2.5 million additional U.S. consumers were potentially impacted, for a total of 145.5 million. Mandiant did not identify any evidence of additional or new attacker activity or any access to new databases or tables. Instead, this additional population of consumers was confirmed during Mandiant’s completion of the remaining investigative tasks and quality assurance procedures built into the investigative process."

The September breach announcement said that persons outside the United States may have been affected. The October 2nd update addressed that, too:

"The completed review also has concluded that there is no evidence the attackers accessed databases located outside of the United States. With respect to potentially impacted Canadian citizens, the company previously had stated that there may have been up to 100,000 Canadian citizens impacted... The completed review subsequently determined that personal information of approximately 8,000 Canadian consumers was impacted. In addition, it also was determined that some of the consumers with affected credit cards announced in the company’s initial statement are Canadian. The company will mail written notice to all of the potentially impacted Canadian citizens."

So, things are worse than originally announced in September: more United States citizens affected, fewer Canadian citizens affected overall but more Canadians' credit card information exposed, and we still don't know the number of United Kingdom residents affected:

"The forensic investigation related to United Kingdom consumers has been completed and the resulting information is now being analyzed in the United Kingdom. Equifax is continuing discussions with regulators in the United Kingdom regarding the scope of the company’s consumer notifications...

And, there's this statement by Paulino do Rego Barros, Jr., the newly appointed interim CEO (after former CEO Richard Smith resigned):

"... As this important phase of our work is now completed, we continue to take numerous steps to review and enhance our cybersecurity practices. We also continue to work closely with our internal team and outside advisors to implement and accelerate long-term security improvements..."

To review? That means Equifax has not finished the job of making its systems and websites more secure with security fixes based upon how the attackers broke in, which identify attacks earlier, and which prevent future breaches. As bad as this sounds, the reality is probably worse.

After testimony before Congress by former Equifax CEO Richard Smith, Wired documented "six fresh horrors" about the breach and the leisurely approach by the credit reporting agency's executives. First, this about the former CEO:

"... during Tuesday's hearing, former CEO Smith added that he first heard about "suspicious activity" in a customer-dispute portal, where Equifax tracks customer complaints and efforts to correct mistakes in their credit reports, on July 31. He moved to hire cybersecurity experts from the law firm King & Spalding to start investigating the issue on August 2. Smith claimed that, at that time, there was no indication that any customer's personally identifying information had been compromised. As it turns out, after repeated questions from lawmakers, Smith admitted he never asked at the time whether PII being affected was even a possibility. Smith further testified that he didn't ask for a briefing about the "suspicious activity" until August 15, almost two weeks after the special investigation began and 18 days after the initial red flag."

Didn't ask about PII? Geez! PII describes the set of data elements which are the most sensitive information about consumers. It's the business of being a credit reporting agency. Waited 2 weeks for a briefing? Not good either. And, that is a most generous description since some experts question whether the breach actually started in March -- about four months before the July event.

Wired reported the following about Smith's Congressional testimony and the March breach:

"Attackers initially got into the affected customer-dispute portal through a vulnerability in the Apache Struts platform, an open-source web application service popular with corporate clients. Apache disclosed and patched the relevant vulnerability on March 6... Smith said there are two reasons the customer-dispute portal didn't receive that patch, known to be critical, in time to prevent the breach. The first excuse Smith gave was "human error." He says there was a particular (unnamed) individual who knew that the portal needed to be patched but failed to notify the appropriate IT team. Second, Smith blamed a scanning system used to spot this sort of oversight that did not identify the customer-dispute portal as vulnerable. Smith said forensic investigators are still looking into why the scanner failed."

Geez! Sounds like a managerial failure, too. Nobody followed up with the unnamed persons responsible for patching the portal? And Equifax executives took a leisurely (and perhaps lackadaisical) approach to protecting sensitive information about consumers:

"When asked by representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois about what data Equifax encrypts in its systems, Smith admitted that the data compromised in the customer-dispute portal was stored in plaintext and would have been easily readable by attackers... It’s unclear exactly what of the pilfered data resided in the portal versus other parts of Equifax’s system, but it turns out that also didn’t matter much, given Equifax's attitude toward encryption overall. “OK, so this wasn’t [encrypted], but your core is?” Kinzinger asked. “Some, not all," Smith replied. "There are varying levels of security techniques that the team deploys in different environments around the business."

Geez! So, we now have confirmation that the "core" information -- the most sensitive data about consumers -- in Equifax's databases is only partially encrypted.

Context matters. In January of this year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) took punitive action against TransUnion and Equifax for deceptive marketing practices involving credit scores and related subscription services. That action included $23.1 million in fines and penalties.

Thanks to member of Congress for asking the tough questions. No thanks to Equifax executives for taking lackadaisical approaches to data security. (TransUnion, Innovis, and Experian executives: are you watching? Learning what mistakes not to repeat?) Equifax has lost my trust.

Until Equifax hardens its systems (I prefer NSA-level hardness), it shouldn't be entrusted with consumers' sensitive personal and payment information. Consumers should be able to totally opt out of credit reporting agencies that fail with data security. This would allow the marketplace to govern things and stop the corporate socialism benefiting credit reporting agencies.

What are your opinions?

[Editor's note: this post was amended on October 7 with information about the CFPB fines.]


Bloomberg: Equifax Had A Data Breach In March, Too. More Questions Result

Equifax logo According to news reports, Equifax experienced another data breach earlier this year before the massive data breach it announced on September 7th where criminals gained unauthorized access to Equifax's systems and computers from May through then end of July, 2017. Bloomberg reported:

"Equifax Inc. learned about a major breach of its computer systems in March -- almost five months before the date it has publicly disclosed, according to three people familiar with the situation... Equifax hired the security firm Mandiant on both occasions and may have believed it had the initial breach under control, only to have to bring the investigators back when it detected suspicious activity again on July 29, two of the people said..."

Two major data breaches? What's happening? A news report by Bank Info Security may clarify things:

"... the Bloomberg story is "attempting to connect two separate cybersecurity events and suggesting the earlier event went unreported." Instead, Equifax says the breach described by Bloomberg was a "security incident involving a payroll-related service." The incident, which Equifax refers to as the "March event," was reported to customers, affected individuals and regulators, as well as covered by the media, it says. "Mandiant has investigated both events and found no evidence that these two separate events or the attackers were related."

Equifax appears to refer a breach involving TALX its payroll, human resources, and tax services subsidiary formally known as Equifax Workforce Solutions. The Bank Info Security news report explained:

"In early March, Equifax began notifying individuals whose employers use TALX for payroll services that it had detected unauthorized access to its web-based portal. Employees use the TALX portal to access their W-2, which is the annual income reporting form that U.S. employees need to file their federal tax return. That's also a key document for fraudsters, because it puts them one step closer to being able to fraudulently file and claim a tax refund in someone else's name.

In the March attack, hackers had luck accessing TALX accounts by guessing registered users' personal questions, according to Equifax's breach notifications. By answering the questions correctly, fraudsters were able to reset a PIN needed to access an account. With the fresh PIN, they were able to obtain an electronic copy of victims' W-2. The unauthorized access incidents occurred between April 17, 2016, and March 29, 2017, Equifax says..."

It's frightening that the TALX breach went undetected for almost a year. Also, the Krebs On Security blog reported in May about the Equifax-TALX breach. However, the Bloomberg news report explored another hacking method criminals might have used in March:

"... one goal of the attackers was to use Equifax as a way into the computers of major banks, according to a fourth person familiar with the matter. This person said a large Canadian bank has determined that hackers claiming to sell celebrity profiles from Equifax on the dark web -- information that appears to be fraudulent, or recycled from other breaches -- did in fact steal the username and password for an application programming interface, or API, linking the bank’s back-end servers to Equifax.

According to the person and a Sept. 14 internal memo reviewed by Bloomberg, the gateway linked a test and development site used by the bank’s wealth management division to Equifax, allowing the two entities to share information digitally."

So, there was a breach in March. Was it the TALX hack, the hack via a bank, both, or something else? If the Bloomberg report is accurate, then the post-breach consequences listed probably apply:

"... will complicate the company’s efforts to explain a series of unusual stock sales by Equifax executives. If it’s shown that those executives did so with the knowledge that either or both breaches could damage the company, they could be vulnerable to charges of insider trading... New questions about Equifax’s timeline are also likely to become central to the crush of lawsuits being filed against the Atlanta-based company. Investigators and consumers alike want to know how a trusted custodian of so many Americans’ private data could let hackers gain access to the most important details of financial identity... the revelation of an earlier breach will likely raise questions for the company’s beleaguered executives over whether that [March] investigation was sufficiently thorough or if it was closed too soon. For example, Equifax has said that the hackers entered the company’s computer banks the second time through a flaw in the company’s web software that was known in March but not patched until the later activity was detected in July."

If true, then consumers are left with more questions: which bank(s)? What fixes have been implemented so this doesn't happen again? Why wasn't this disclosed sooner? How many consumers were affected? Exactly how did the hackers gain access? Was it the same or a different group of hackers? Which consumers' data elements were accessed/stolen?

The cynic in me wonders if Equifax executives are using its TALX breach as cover -- to avoid having to admit to another massive (and embarrassing) data breach.

Regardless of which news report is accurate, there are plenty of reasons for consumers to feel uneasy about Equifax's breach(es), data security protections, and breach notifications. Equifax is a custodian of extremely valuable and sensitive information about consumers. It makes money selling that information to potential lenders, and consumers have a right to have their questions answered fully.

Maybe the various investigations and inquiry by 31 states will provide answers for consumers. Or maybe Congress needs to hold hearings. It's been done before. What do you think?


Equifax Data Breach: 11 Reasons Why It Is Worse Than You Think

Equifax logo Equifax, one of the three major credit reporting agencies, announced on September 7 a massive data breach where criminals accessed the company's computer systems. How bad is it? It is instructive to analyze the text of Equifax's breach announcement:

"... a cybersecurity incident potentially impacting approximately 143 million U.S. consumers. Criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files. Based on the company's investigation, the unauthorized access occurred from mid-May through July 2017. The company has found no evidence of unauthorized activity on Equifax's core consumer or commercial credit reporting databases.

The information accessed primarily includes names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver's license numbers. In addition, credit card numbers for approximately 209,000 U.S. consumers, and certain dispute documents with personal identifying information for approximately 182,000 U.S. consumers, were accessed."

First, this is huge. Do the math 143 million persons is about 44 percent of the United States population of 325 million on July 4, 2017. So, almost half of the population was affected. Not good. But, there's more to this than size.

Second, the announcement stated "approximately." So, the true number could be lower or higher. The vagueness suggests that Equifax doesn't really know exactly how many consumers were affected. Not good. And, other details support this assumption that Equifax really doesn't know.

Third, the announcement stated "accessed." During the 10+ years I've written this blog, I've read dozens or hundreds of breach announcements. Many use this term. While the term may accurately describe what's Equifax knows, it also can be misleading. Criminals don't access companies' systems simply to window-shop or read files. They access systems to download and steal valuable information they can either use to make money, or resell to others. It's what online criminals do.

Fourth, the data elements accessed stolen allow criminals to do a lot of damage. That might include: a) obtain fraudulent loans or credit in breach victims' names; b) impersonate breach victims (it's called pretexting) to access online accounts; c) with online access withdraw money from victims' bank accounts; and much more. With online access, criminals can change passwords and take over victims' accounts effectively locking out victims.

Fifth, the breach investigation isn't finished:

"Equifax discovered the unauthorized access on July 29 of this year and acted immediately to stop the intrusion. The company promptly engaged a leading, independent cybersecurity firm that has been conducting a comprehensive forensic review to determine the scope of the intrusion, including the specific data impacted. Equifax also reported the criminal access to law enforcement and continues to work with authorities. While the company's investigation is substantially complete, it remains ongoing and is expected to be completed in the coming weeks."

The announcement didn't state when Equifax expected the investigation to be finished. Days? Weeks? Months? Not good.

Equifax hired an outside, independent technology firm to investigate its breach. That's what companies usually do during their post-breach response. This tiny bit of good news is quickly overshadowed by the bad. Without a completed breach investigation, Equifax can't really know whether the breach was caused by a technical systems problem, employee error, management oversight lapses, a sloppy or incompetent subcontractor, something else, or a combination of items. Only after a completed breach investigation can Equifax implement one or several fixes so this won't happen again. Not good.

Sixth, without knowing how criminals accessed their systems it is unlikely Equifax also can't know with certainty what data elements about consumers were stolen. More data elements could have been stolen, perhaps entire credit reports. Not good.

Seventh, it seems that Equifax's intrusion detection systems failed. Just look at the timeline. The breach started in mid-May and Equifax discovered it near the end of July. So, criminals had at least 2 full months to steal whatever they could find. Not good. Plus, after discovering the breach it would take Equifax another 5 weeks later to announce it. Why the delays? The breach announcement doesn't explain why. Not good.

Eighth, Equifax seems to take shortcuts with its breach notification:

"Equifax has established a dedicated website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, to help consumers determine if their information has been potentially impacted and to sign up for credit file monitoring and identity theft protection."

Setting up a website to convey breach updates to consumers is a good thing, but using the site to notify consumers about the breach is not good for two reasons: a) the site requires consumers to enter many of the same sensitive, valuable data elements criminals want to steal; and b) it forces consumers to trust that the breach site is secure, when we know that the breach investigation is incomplete. This is a breach notification failure.

In the 10+ years I've written this blog, trustworthy companies notify breach victims via postal mail. Why won't Equifax notify all breach victims directly via postal mail? It has consumers' residential addresses in its databases. (That is a benefit for its lending customers.) So, the lack of data is not an excuse. Plus, the credit reporting agency is willing to notify some consumers directly:

"In addition to the website, Equifax will send direct mail notices to consumers whose credit card numbers or dispute documents with personal identifying information were impacted."

Rather than notify all breach victims directly, Equifax seems to want to take shortcuts. Maybe it is to save money, laziness, or poor decisions by its executives. The announcement doesn't explain why, so consumers are left to draw their own conclusions. Not good.

Ninth, technologists have questioned the security of Equifax's new breach site. Ars Technica reported:

"... the website www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/, which Equifax created to notify people of the breach, is highly problematic for a variety of reasons. It runs on a stock installation WordPress, a content management system that doesn't provide the enterprise-grade security required for a site that asks people to provide their last name and all but three digits of their Social Security number. The TLS certificate doesn't perform proper revocation checks. Worse still, the domain name isn't registered to Equifax, and its format looks like precisely the kind of thing a criminal operation might use to steal people's details..."

Reportedly, the domain name registration problem was fixed on Sunday. Still, Equifax's post-breach response appears amateurish. Meanwhile, data security problems persisted in its main website. According to Ars Technica:

"... in the hours immediately following the breach disclosure, the main Equifax website was displaying debug codes, which for security reasons, is something that should never happen on any production server, especially one that is a server or two away from so much sensitive data. A mistake this serious does little to instill confidence company engineers have hardened the site against future devastating attacks."

So, Equifax hasn't completed its breach investigation, doesn't know how its systems were hacked, has vulnerabilities in its main site, but wants consumers to trust that its breach site is secure. Not good.

Tenth, the Equifax announcement promoted its credit monitoring service (emphasis added):

"Equifax has established a dedicated website... to help consumers determine if their information has been potentially impacted and to sign up for credit file monitoring and identity theft protection. The offering, called TrustedID Premier, includes 3-Bureau credit monitoring of Equifax, Experian and TransUnion credit reports; copies of Equifax credit reports; the ability to lock and unlock Equifax credit reports; identity theft insurance; and Internet scanning for Social Security numbers - all complimentary to U.S. consumers for one year."

One year? Are Equifax executives serious? Stolen consumers' credentials don't magically lose value after one year. Criminals will use stolen credentials (e.g., name, address, Social Security Number, birth date, etc.) as long as they can. Criminals will resell stolen data to other criminals as long as the data has value. In my opinion, Equifax should provide complimentary lifetime credit monitoring indefinitely to all breach victims.

Why lifetime? Because the data elements accessed stolen have ongoing value. The cynical part of me wonders if some finance executives have done the math. As long as credit reporting agency executives believe that one year of free credit monitoring will appease breach victims, it's cheaper to pay that cost (plus a few out-of-court settlements), rather than implement more robust data security.

Eleventh, there is a history of questionable decisions by Equifax executives. In 2007, it paid a $2.7 million fine for violating federal credit laws. In 2009, it paid a $65,000 fine to the state of Indiana for violating the state's security freeze law. In 2012, Equifax and some of its customers paid $1.6 million to settle allegations of improper list sales. Earlier this year, Equifax and TransUnion paid $23.1 million to settle allegations of deceptive advertising about credit scores.

This history provides some context to news reports that three Equifax executives sold about $1.8 million in stock after the breach was discovered and before the public breach announcement. Equifax stock fell about 13 percent after the breach announcement. The company said on Thursday that these executives didn't know about the intrusion when they sold shares. Even if true, the optics of this look absolutely terrible.

The whole sordid affair should be a reminder to consumers that we are the product. Credit reporting agencies' true customers are lenders - the companies that lend money and make loans to consumers. Equifax makes its money selling credit reports to lenders.

What to make of this? I see several considerations for consumers:

  1. Assume the worst. Every time you hear or read the word "accessed" by Equifax, replace it with "stolen." Then, make your data security decisions accordingly.
  2. If you don't trust the security of Equifax's breach site, then call the company instead via the hotline listed in the breach announcement (preferably using a landline phone) to see if you are affected.
  3. Carefully consider the advantages and disadvantages of Equifax's offer of free credit monitoring and identity theft protection. Equifax has been criticized for forcing arbitration on consumers who accept the free credit monitoring offer. In a September 11th update in its breach site, Equifax reversed course and said the arbitration clause and class-action waiver don't apply in this incident. Regardless, read the fine print before signing up. They may try to re-insert it later. If you don't know what it is, learn about arbitration. A variety of companies have inserted these clauses into their user agreements policies. You'll need to learn about arbitration anyway in order to make informed purchase decisions about other products and services.
  4. If you don't need credit, consider a Security Freeze to lock down your Equifax credit reports. Then, Equifax can't sell your credit report to lenders. You can do this at all three major credit reporting agencies. I did this several years ago after a data breach by a former employer. Know that a Security Freeze is not a cure-all, since it won't stop data breaches and it won't stop all forms of identity theft and fraud. To learn more, this blog has plenty of information about credit reporting agencies, credit monitoring services, fraud alerts for your credit reports, and security freezes.
  5. If you dislike Equifax's post-breach response, then contact your elected officials and demand that they pressure Equifax to do the right thing: a) notify all breach victims directly via postal mail; and b) implement better data security.
  6. Equifax's post-breach response makes me question whether the company is really up to the data security task -- it's responsibility -- to adequately protect consumers' sensitive information. All credit reporting agencies are high-value targets by criminals. If Equifax's executives didn't understand this before, they should now -- and take actions to demonstrate to consumers they realize the seriousness of the breach. Words are not enough.
  7. Consumers lack choices. Citizens cannot opt in nor opt out of the data collection by credit reporting agencies. (Consumers can opt out of pre-approved credit offers, but can't opt out of the data collection. There's a difference.) Also, the Equifax breach highlights the hypocrisy of pundits and politicians who object to the mandate within Obamacare (e.g., the Affordable Care Act) legislation -- some called it socialism -- while remaining remain silent about a similarly socialistic mandate with credit reporting.

While writing a post recently about misdeeds at Wells Fargo, I asked the question: "How much damage can one bank do?" Now, I find myself asking a similar question about Equifax: "How much damage can one company do?" Credit and lending are essential to the United States economy. In my opinion, all credit reporting agencies should have NSA-level data security for their networks and computer systems. The data they archive is that critical.

And: if you can't protect it, don't collect it. It's that simple.

As more issues emerge about this breach, I will address them in subsequent posts. What are your opinions of the Equifax breach? Did you lock down your credit reports with a Security Freeze?


The State of Massachusetts Data Breach Archive Is Available Online

The Massachusetts Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulations (OCABR) announced the public availability online of its data breach notification archive. To comply with Massachusetts state laws enacted in 2007, companies and entities must notify both the OCABR and the Attorney General's Office anytime personal information is accidentally or intentionally compromised.

Consumer Affairs Undersecretary John Chapman stated:

“The Data Breach Notification Archive is a public record that the public and media have every right to view... Making it easily accessible by putting it online is not only in keeping with the guidelines suggested in the new Public Records law, but also with Governor Baker’s commitment to greater transparency throughout the Executive Office.”

The OCABR breach archive includes a tabular listing of data breaches in Adobe PDF format. Each listing includes the following data elements: date the breach was reported, organization name, breach type, number of residents affected, types of sensitive personal data (e.g., Social Security Number, account number, driver's license identifier, credit card number) exposed or stolen, whether the organization offered free credit monitoring to affected residents, if the data was encrypted, and if the breach included mobile devices. The archive does not include the full text of the breach notification letters received. The breach archive also includes summary information:

Breaches and Residents Affected By Year
Year # Notifications # Affected Residents
2007 (Nov to Dec) 30 8,499
2008 413 700,918
2009 437 357,869
2010 473 1,015,693
2011 614 1,163,917
2012 1,139 326,411
2013 1,829 1,163,643
2014 1,603 354,130
2015 1,834 1,338,048
2016 1,866 188,809
Total 10,238 5,454,294

According to the Census Bureau, Massachusetts' population was just under 6.8 million in 2015. So, the total number of affected residents equals about 80 percent of the state's population.

Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Tennessee recently strengthened their breach laws with expanded definitions, encryption, requirements to notify the state's attorney general, and requirements to notify affected persons within forty-five (45) days. While most states -- 46 have some type of breach laws, some (California, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin) post online breach notices they have received.

Some states' sites provide their breach archives using static Adobe PDF file formats. The better-designed sites make it easy for residents to search and view information about specific breach incidents. these sites feature interactive search mechanisms that allow users to enter the name of company or state agency, date range filters, and file download options compatible with spreadsheet software. Some states -- California, South Carolina, and Washington -- produce detailed breach reports explaining the breaches by industry, type, and cause.

Without the full text, interactive search, and filter mechanisms, the OCABR breach archive is a marginally helpful resource. Consumers can still use it to verify the breach notices they have received via postal mail, since identity thieves often send fake breach notices trying to trick consumers into revealing their sensitive personal information. Using the OCABR breach archive is slow and awkward, since users must download each PDF file and perform a text search for an organization with each file. Plus, the archive lacks both street address and company business unit information, making it impossible for users to distinguish between entries with the same organization name.

Basically, something is better than nothing.

What are your opinions of the breach archive by Massachusetts? If I missed any states that provide beach notices online, please share below.


Yahoo Announced Another Massive Data Breach. Has Begun Notifying Affected Users

Yahoo logo Yahoo announced on Wednesday a new data breach that affected as many as one billion users. The company believes this latest breach is different from its September 2016 breach. After law enforcement notified Yahoo in November about data files a third party claimed were stolen during the latest breach:

"... The company analyzed this data with the assistance of outside forensic experts and found that it appears to be Yahoo user data. Based on further analysis of this data by the forensic experts, Yahoo believes an unauthorized third party, in August 2013, stole data associated with more than one billion user accounts. The company has not been able to identify the intrusion associated with this theft. Yahoo believes this incident is likely distinct from the incident the company disclosed on September 22, 2016."

The data elements stolen included full names, e-mail addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords and, in some cases, encrypted or un-encrypted security questions and answers. The announcement also said that no payment card data or bank account information was stolen.

Regardless, this is bad. First, Yahoo doesn't know how the criminals hacked its systems. So, it cannot prevent another breach. Second, law enforcement notified Yahoo. It's breach detection systems failed. Third, one billion is a lot of affected users. Fourth, the data elements stolen expose affected users to spam and attempted break-ins to their other online accounts. Cyber criminals will test stolen passwords at other sites to see where else they can access. It's what they do.

Fifth, Yahoo's stock price is falling again after news broke about the latest breach. Verizon has already said it will re-evaluate its acquisition offer based upon the latest news, or it may terminate the acquisition deal entirely.

Yahoo's breach announcement also disclosed:

"Separately, Yahoo previously disclosed that its outside forensic experts were investigating the creation of forged cookies that could allow an intruder to access users' accounts without a password. Based on the ongoing investigation, the company believes an unauthorized third party accessed the company's proprietary code to learn how to forge cookies. The outside forensic experts have identified user accounts for which they believe forged cookies were taken or used. Yahoo is notifying the affected account holders, and has invalidated the forged cookies. The company has connected some of this activity to the same state-sponsored actor believed to be responsible for the data theft the company disclosed on September 22, 2016."

That's not good, either. The announcement did not disclose the name of the state-sponsored actor.

A reader of this blog shared the e-mail breach notice they received from Bob Lord, the Chief Information Security Officer at Yahoo. The breach notice contained much of the same content as the online announcement, but omitted the above information about forged cookies. The breach notice sent to users stated:

"From: Yahoo (Yahoo@communications.yahoo.com)
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 7:38 PM
Subject: Important Security Information for Yahoo Users

NOTICE OF DATA BREACH

Dear XXXXXXX,
We are writing to inform you about a data security issue that may involve your Yahoo account information. We have taken steps to secure your account and are working closely with law enforcement.

What Happened?
Law enforcement provided Yahoo in November 2016 with data files that a third party claimed was Yahoo user data. We analyzed this data with the assistance of outside forensic experts and found that it appears to be Yahoo user data. Based on further analysis of this data by the forensic experts, we believe an unauthorized third party, in August 2013, stole data associated with a broader set of user accounts, including yours. We have not been able to identify the intrusion associated with this theft. We believe this incident is likely distinct from the incident we disclosed on September 22, 2016.

What Information Was Involved?
The stolen user account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (using MD5) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers. Not all of these data elements may have been present for your account. The investigation indicates that the stolen information did not include passwords in clear text, payment card data, or bank account information. Payment card data and bank account information are not stored in the system we believe was affected.

What We Are Doing
We are taking action to protect our users:

  • We are requiring potentially affected users to change their passwords.
  • We invalidated unencrypted security questions and answers so that they cannot be used to access an account.
  • We continuously enhance our safeguards and systems that detect and prevent unauthorized access to user accounts.

What You Can Do
We encourage you to follow these security recommendations:

  • Change your passwords and security questions and answers for any other accounts on which you used the same or similar information used for your Yahoo account.
  • Review all of your accounts for suspicious activity.
  • Be cautious of any unsolicited communications that ask for your personal information or refer you to a web page asking for personal information.
  • Avoid clicking on links or downloading attachments from suspicious emails.

Additionally, please consider using Yahoo Account Key, a simple authentication tool that eliminates the need to use a password on Yahoo altogether.

For More Information
For more information about this issue and our security resources, please visit the Yahoo Security Issues FAQs page available at https://yahoo.com/security-update.

Protecting your information is important to us and we work continuously to strengthen our defenses.

Sincerely,

Bob Lord
Chief Information Security Officer
Yahoo"

What are your opinions of the latest breach at Yahoo? Is the company doing enough to protect users' information?


Yahoo Confirms Massive Data Breach. Unclear If Users At Its Outsourcing Clients Were Also Affected

Yahoo logo After reports about a rumored announcement, Yahoo confirmed late on Thursday a massive data breach affecting half a billion users -- 500 million persons. Yahoo believes the breach was performed by a "state-sponsored actor."

Data elements exposed and stolen during the breach include full names, e-mail addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords and, in some cases, security questions and answers. The breach dated back to 2014. This is very serious, and by far the largest breach ever. The data elements stolen facilitate spam and a variety of scams; plus access to email contacts such as clients, customers, and patients.

Yahoo's breach announcement stated:

"The ongoing investigation suggests that stolen information did not include unprotected passwords, payment card data, or bank account information; payment card data and bank account information are not stored in the system that the investigation has found to be affected. Based on the ongoing investigation, Yahoo believes that information associated with at least 500 million user accounts was stolen and the investigation has found no evidence that the state-sponsored actor is currently in Yahoo’s network. Yahoo is working closely with law enforcement on this matter..."

Yahoo is in the process of notifying affected persons. Affected users should change their passwords, security questions, and answers.

The breach announcement did not state if users at outsourcing clients were affected. Other companies and entities can outsource their e-mail services to Yahoo, or to other e-mail providers offering similar services. One such company appears to be AT&T. The "AT&T Email Basics" page (see image below) references a co-branded AT&T-Yahoo website for AT&T customers to check their e-mail.

AT&T Email Basics page references Yahoo site for email. Click to view larger version I reached out to AT&T for a comment. A reply was not received by press time. If its email users were affected by the breach, then those users will probably want to know who is going to assist them, and what assistance will be offered.

Given the pending acquisition of Yahoo by Verizon, several AT&T customers already discussed in an online forum concerns about what might happen to their e-mail service operated by a competitor. (Verizon said on Thursday it learned about the breach two days ago.) If users at outsourcing clients were also affected by the breach, then this might add to their uncertainty.

If you received a breach notice from Yahoo, what is your opinion of the response?


4 States Strengthen Their Breach Notification Laws

The National Law Review summarized breach notification laws strengthened in four states: Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. The stronger laws include several changes: expanded definitions, encryption, requirements to notify the state's attorney general, and requirements to notify affected persons within forty-five (45) days.

Several states expanded their definitions of "personal information" to better protect consumers:

"Nevada now includes in its definition of “personal information” a medical identification number, a health insurance identification number, and a user name, unique identifier or electronic mail address in combination with a password, access code or security question and answer that permits access to an online account. Similarly, Rhode Island now counts as “personal information” any medical information, health insurance information, and an email address in combination with any required security code, access code or password that allows access to an individual’s personal, medical, insurance or financial account..."

Some of the expanded definitions made by Tennessee:

"Tennessee broadened its definition of “unauthorized persons” to include an employee of a covered entity who is discovered to have obtained personal information and intentionally used it for an unlawful purpose. Tennessee also removed the word “unencrypted” from its definition of “Breach of the security system” in order to ensure that partial encryption of compromised personal information does not evade the statute."

Read the rest of the changes in the National Law Review article.


Data Breaches At HEI Hotels & Resorts Affects 20 Properties In At Least 10 States

HEI Hotels and Resorts logo On Friday, Hei Hotels and Resorts (HEI) announced data breaches that affected 20 properties in 11 states. According to the company's breach notice, hackers installed malware within the company's payment processing systems to collect customers' payment data.

The payment information stolen included the names, payment card account numbers, card expiration dates, and verification codes of customers who used their payment cards at point-of-sale terminals. The list of hotels by state:

State City & Property
California La Jolla: San Diego Marriott La Jolla
Pasadena: The Westin Pasadena
San Diego: Renaissance San Diego Downtown Hotel
San Francisco: Le Meridien San Francisco
Santa Barbara: Hyatt Centri Santa Barbara
Colorado Snowmass Village: The Westin Snowmass Resort
District of Columbia Washington: The Westin Washington DC City Center
Florida Boca Raton: Boca Raton Marriott at Boca Center
Fort Lauderdale: The Westin Fort Lauderdale
Miami: Royal Palm South Beach Miami
Tampa: InterContinental Tampa Bay
Illinois Chicago: Hotel Chicago Downtown
Minnesota Minneapolis: The Hotel Minneapolis Autograph Collection
Minneapolis: The Westin Minneapolis
Pennsylvania Philadelphia: The Westin Philadelphia
Tennessee Nashville: Sheraton Music City Hotel
Texas Fort Worth: Dallas Fort Worth Marriott Hotel & Golf Club
Vermont Manchester Village; Equinox Resort Golf Resort & Spa
Virginia Arlington: Le Meridien Arlington
Arlington: Sheraton Pentagon City

The exact date of the breaches varied by property. Some breaches occurred as early as March, 2015 while others continued until as recent as June 17, 2016. A card processor notified HEI of the breach. The HEI breach notice stated:

"We are treating this matter as a top priority, and took steps to address and contain this incident promptly after it was discovered, including engaging outside data forensic experts to assist us in investigating and re mediating the situation and promptly transitioning payment card processing to a stand-alone system that is completely separated from the rest of our network. In addition, we have disabled the malware and are in the process of re configuring various components of our network and payment systems to enhance the security of these systems. We have contacted law enforcement and will continue to cooperate with their investigation. We are also coordinating with the banks and payment card companies. While we are continuing to review and enhance our security measures, the incident has now been contained and customers can safely use payment cards at all HEI properties."

HEI is notifying affected customers and consumers that may have been affected:

"... We recommend that customers review credit and debit card account statements as soon as possible in order to determine if there are any discrepancies or unusual activity listed. We urge customers to remain vigilant and continue to monitor statements for unusual activity going forward. If they see anything they do not understand or that looks suspicious, or if they suspect that any fraudulent transactions have taken place, customers should immediately notify the issuer of the credit or debit card. In instances of payment card fraud, it is important to note that federal laws and cardholder policies may limit cardholders’ responsibility for fraudulent activity; we therefore recommend reporting any suspicious activity in a timely fashion to the bank that issued the card..."

The HEI breach notice contains more information for affected consumers to review their credit reports, place Fraud Alerts, and place Credit Freezes.

HEI appears to have been caught unprepared. It did not detect the intrusion, and its breach notice did not arrange for any free credit monitoring for affected consumers. Hopefully, more information is forthcoming.

If you received a breach notice from HEI, what are your opinions of the breach? Of HEI's response so far?


Data Breaches At Maryland Parking Garages Affect Thousands

Data breaches at three parking garages in downtown Annapolis, Maryland habe put the sensitive personal and payment data of thousands of consumers at risk. WJZ, the CBS affiliate in Annapolis, reported a:

"... preliminary investigation shows that the breach took place from December 23, 2015 to June 11, 2016 — nearly six months — at the Noah Hill, Gott’s Court and Knighton garages... The breach affects drivers who used the daily parking option, not those who have monthly plans or residents."

After learning about the breach, the city switched to cash-only payments. While the city responded quickly, questions remain. The news report did not mention when and how affected persons would be notified of the breach. A brief scan on Monday of the Annapolis Parking website didn't not find any breach notices. Consumers need to be notified promptly.

Also, the nature of the breach suggests that the payment terminals were compromised. Many consumers are probably thinking: I don't live in nor visit Annapolis, so no problem.

Well, big problem. We all visit and park our vehicles at downtown city locations. Some people visit more often than others. You don't have to look far to find breaches at parking garages in Chicago, Cleveland, and at this parking vendor which serves several cities.

This Annapolis parking-garage breach is a reminder of the vulnerability of payment terminals at all parking garages. Like the pumps at gas stations, parking garages have free-standing payment terminals that are unattended for long periods of time. This creates an opportunity for criminals to tamper with the terminals, and install skimming devices either inside or on the exterior of terminals. It is a popular tactic by criminals on both ATM machines and gas stations.

So, when you pay using a debit- or credit card at a parking garage, you are betting that the garage operator regularly inspects their payment terminals for skimming devices, and adequately protects their computer systems from hacks and malware.


LinkedIn Data Breach Was Larger And Worse Than Consumers First Told. 117 Million Persons Affected

LinkedIn.com logo The 2012 data breach at LinkedIn.com was far larger and worse than originally thought. Motherboard reported:

"A hacker is trying to sell the account information, including emails and passwords, of 117 million LinkedIn users. The hacker, who goes by the name “Peace,” told Motherboard that the data was stolen during the LinkedIn breach of 2012. At the time, only around 6.5 million encrypted passwords were posted online, and LinkedIn never clarified how many users were affected by that breach... The paid hacked data search engine LeakedSource also claims to have obtained the data. Both Peace and the one of the people behind LeakedSource said that there are 167 million accounts in the hacked database. Of those, around 117 million have both emails and encrypted passwords."

So, the breach included 167 records affecting as many persons, not 6.5 million. And, 117 million people are at risk now. To make matters worse, hackers have already cracked the encryption method LinkedIn.com used to protect users' passwords:

"The passwords were originally encrypted or hashed with the SHA1 algorithm, with no “salt,” which is a series of random digits attached to the end of hashes to make them harder to be cracked. One of the operators of LeakedSource told Motherboard in an online chat that so far they have cracked “90% of the passwords in 72 hours..."

And, the incident cast doubt on both LinkedIn.com's breach detection methods and the response by the company's executives:

"... LinkedIn spokesperson Hani Durzy told Motherboard that the company’s security team was looking into the incident, but that at the time they couldn’t confirm whether the data was legitimate. Durzy, however, also admitted that the 6.5 million hashes that were posted online in 2012 were not necessarily all of the passwords stolen. “We don’t know how much was taken,” Durzy told me in a phone call. The lesson: For LinkedIn, the lesson is the same as four years ago: don’t store password in an insecure way..."

LinkedIn released a statement yesterday. Relevant portions:

"Yesterday, we became aware of an additional set of data that had just been released that claims to be email and hashed password combinations of more than 100 million LinkedIn members from that same theft in 2012. We are taking immediate steps to invalidate the passwords of the accounts impacted, and we will contact those members to reset their passwords. We have no indication that this is as a result of a new security breach... For several years, we have hashed and salted every password in our database, and we have offered protection tools such as email challenges and dual factor authentication. We encourage our members to visit our safety center to learn about enabling two-step verification, and to use strong passwords... We're moving swiftly to address the release of additional data from a 2012 breach, specifically: We have begun to invalidate passwords for all accounts created prior to the 2012 breach​ that haven’t update​d​ their password since that breach. We will let individual members know​ ​if they need to reset their password. However, regularly changing your password is always a good idea..."

Many people use the LinkedIn.com social site to network with professionals in their field, and find jobs. If you use the site, experts advise consumers to change your password immediately and don't reuse the same password at multiple websites.


Breach Notifications Rise More Than 40 Percent In New York

Breach notifications involving New York State residents have risen more than 40 percent compared to a year ago. Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced on Wednesday that his office:

"... has received 459 data breach notices from the first of the year through May 2, 2016, as compared with 327 through the same time last year. In the year 2015 alone, the office received 809 data breach notices. The office is expecting to receive well over 1000 notices for the year, a new record."

The New York State Information Security Breach & Notification Act requires companies to provide notice to the Attorney General office and to affected consumers. Companies use an online submission form. Previously, notifications were submitted via postal mail, fax, or email.

The Attorney General's office released a data breach report in July 2014 which found:

"... the number of reported data security breaches in New York more than tripled between 2006 and 2013. In that same period, 22.8 million personal records of New Yorkers were exposed in nearly 5,000 data breaches, which cost the public and private sectors in New York upward of $1.37 billion in 2013. In addition, the report also found that hacking intrusions – in which third parties gain unauthorized access to data stored on a computer system – were the leading cause of data security breaches, accounting for roughly 40 percent of all breaches."

If you receive a breach notification letter, the Identity Theft Resource Center advises consumers to (links added):

"1. Call the three credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and Transunion) and request a 90-day fraud alert be placed on your credit reports.

2. Request your annual free credit report from each of the aforementioned credit bureaus and review them for any inaccuracies...

3. If you do find any inaccuracies, call the three credit bureaus and request a security freeze be placed on your credit reports. This may cost a nominal fee depending on the state that you are in and does not allow new credit lines to be processed until you personally unfreeze your credit. Even if you do not find any inaccuracies, you may want to consider putting a security freeze on your credit as a precautionary measure.

4. File your tax returns as early as possible to avoid an identity thief filing a tax return under your name in order to receive fraudulent tax refunds.

5. Contact the Social Security Administration and request your wage report to ensure that an identity thief has not reported fraudulent wages which you may have to pay taxes on if not resolved.

6. For more details on what to do if you have received a data breach notification letter, please read our ITRC Fact Sheet FS 129."

Learn how to spot fake breach notices from scammers. To help residents confirm breach notifications, A few states (Maryland, New Hampshire, Vermont, Wisconsin) post online breach notices they have received.

Comments? Opinions? If you know of any states that post breach notices online, please tell us below.


How To Recognize Bogus OPM Breach Letters From Scammers

Earlier this year, a data breach at the Office of Personnel management (OPM) federal government agency exposed the sensitive personal information of government employees, former government employees, and their families. Identity criminals and fraudsters are taking advantage of the breach by sending bogus breach letters supposedly from the OPM.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) advised consumers how to recognize valid letters from the OPM:

"Real Letters Contain>: a) A 25 digit PIN to register for credit and identity monitoring services. Make sure your PIN is real by entering it at opm.gov/cybersecurity; b) Instructions to visit the website opm.gov/cybersecurityto get more information and sign up for monitoring"

How to spot bogus OPM solicitations from scammers:

  1. The OPM will not ask you to confirm your personal information. So, do not share it with anyone asking
  2. The OPM is not using e-mail. They are using surface postal mail.

If you lost your PIN number or didn't receive a breach notice from the OPM and think that you are affected, then you can confirm your status at the OPM security site. If you receive a bogus letter from scammers about this or other breaches, report it to the BBB.


Learning Apps Company Confirms Data Breach Affecting 11.6 Million Persons

Vtech logo Earlier today, educational toy maker VTech confirmed a data breach affecting 11.6 million persons. On November 27, Motherboard first reported the breach affecting 5 million parents and 200,000 children. The data breach is larger than first reported by many news organizations.

In its FAQ page, VTech confirmed that on November 14 hackers accessed its customer database:

"... on our Learning Lodge app store customer database and Kid Connect servers. Learning Lodge allows our customers to download apps, learning games, e-books and other educational content to their VTech products.  Kid Connect allows parents using a smartphone app to chat with their kids using a VTech tablet."

The company learned of the data breach on November 24 when a journalist inquired. During its current breach investigation, During its breach investigation, Vtech has temporarily suspended operations at Learning Lodge, the Kid Connect network, and a dozen websites including both PlanetVtech and VSmileLink sites in the US, France, Germany, United Kingdom, and Spain. Vtech's customer data includes the USA, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Germany, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Luxembourg, Latin America, Hong Kong, China, Australia and New Zealand.

The number of persons affected by the breach:

"In total 4,854,209 customer (parent) accounts and 6,368,509 related kid profiles worldwide are affected, which includes approximately 1.2 million Kid Connect parent accounts.  In addition, there are 235,708 parent and 227,705 kids accounts in PlanetVTech. Kid profiles unlike account profiles only include name, gender and birthdate."

The VTech FAQ page also listed the number of breach victims by country. Parent accounts include the following data elements: name, e-mail address, security question and answer for password retrieval, IP address, mailing address, download history, and encrypted password. VTech's customer database does not contain credit card payment information, nor Social Security and similar identification information.

VTech describes itself as a global leader in electronic learning products for children and the world's largest manufacturer of cordless phones. Founded in 1976, VTech is headquartered in Hong Kong and has operations in 11 countries including manufacturing facilities in China. It employs about 30,000 employees, with 1,500 research and development professionals in Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, and China.

Even though customers' passwords were encrypted, VTech advised breach victims to change their passwords anyway, as skilled hackers may break the encryption. This is critical if breach victims used the same passwords, security questions, and security answers at other online sites.

This is not good. Whatever security detection software VTech used needs to be upgraded or replaced. A company should not learn about a breach from a journalist. The data elements stolen are sufficient for criminals to impersonate data breach victims, attempt to break into victims' other online accounts (e.g., banking), and send spam e-mail messages.

Do you or your children use VTech apps, games, or e-books? If so, what breach notifications have you received?


Experian Data Breach Affects 15 Million T-Mobile Customers, And Highlights Privacy Concerns

Experian logo Experian, one of the three major credit-reporting agencies in the United States, announced last week a data breach at affected at least 15 million T-Mobile customers. Unauthorized persons accessed an Experian server which contained personal information about consumer who had applied for T-Mobile USA services between September 1 and September 16, 2015.

Experian discovered the breach on September 15, 2015. The information accessed and stolen included names, addresses, Social Security Numbers, birth dates, identification numbers (e.g., driver's license, military ID, passport number, etc.), and additional data related to T-Mobile's credit-check process. The credit reporting agency also said:

"Experian’s consumer credit database was not accessed in this incident, and no payment card or banking information was obtained."

Thank heavens for little favors. Thankfully, at least one Experian employee had the good sense to segregate its database of T-Mobile customers from its database of everyone else. Otherwise, the hackers would have accessed and stolen sensitive personal information for 250 million persons. And, the "no payment card or banking information was obtained," is like saying bank thieves stole everything but not the one-, five-, and ten-dollar bills. This is bad folks, and Experian should not issue statements in a failed attempt to perfume-a-pig. The pig still stinks.

Experian has notified and is working with both federal and international law enforcement agencies. The post-breach investigation is ongoing. The company is notifying affected persons and will offer two years of free credit monitoring and identity resolution services. Some security experts are skeptical, and questioned whether Experian deployed the data-breach-detection services of 41st Parameter, a wholly owned subsidiary.

John Legere, the t-Mobile Chief Executive, said in a statement:

"Obviously I am incredibly angry about this data breach and we will institute a thorough review of our relationship with Experian..."

Understandable and justified anger. No doubt, lawsuits will result.

This is not good. The data elements stolen are sufficient for criminals to apply for fraudulent loans, create fraudulent identification cards, and effectively approach the family, friends, coworkers, and classmates by impersonating breach victims.

This is not the first data breach at Experian. In February 2014, hackers used a client's login credentials to access an undisclosed number of consumers' records. The data stolen included consumer credit reports, names, addresses, Social Security Numbers, birth dates, and additional information commonly found in credit reports. In May 2012, Experian announced a breach where hackers accessed an undisclosed number of consumers' records between October 19, 2011 and February 13, 2012. A breach in 2009 affected Maryland residents, and a lawsuit was filed in July 2015 against Experian for allegedly selling consumer information to a criminal posing as a data broker. That criminal allegedly resold data to other identity thieves.

Some critics demand stronger consequences. Fight for the Future's Jeff Lyon said:

"Experian CEO Brian Cassin has put the profits of his company above the well-being of his customers and our nation's cybersecurity. Why should Experian bother fixing their security when they can just lobby their way out of the messes they make?"... This type of thinking is putting millions of people at risk. Cassin should resign..."

I agree. Cassin should resign. Lyon's comments allude to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) of 2013, which is making its way through Congress. Privacy advocates argue that the bill fails to provide adequate data security protections and instead promotes data sharing of consumers' information with the federal government to facilitate surveillance. Some argue that the bill will actually hurt privacy.

I agree. It's poor legislation. Now, back to Experian. The credit reporting agency's track record of breaches is troubling. Paying post-breach related costs (e.g., free credit monitoring), again, is not enough of an incentive to change executives' behavior. Companies won't change until there are direct consequences for executives. Experian executives know better. It is in the business of collecting, archiving, and protecting consumers' sensitive personal and financial information.

What are your opinions?


Luxury Trump Hotel In Las Vegas Begins Notification Of Consumers About Data Breach

Trump International Hotel and Tower Las Vegas logo The law firm representing the luxury Trump International Hotel and Tower property in Las Vegas announced at data breach affecting its client. To comply with breach notification laws in many states, corporations (or their agents) typically submit breach notices (e.g., sample or final) to the attorney general or applicable legal agency in each state where there are affected residents.

The breach notice at the California Attorney General website (Adobe PDF) read, in part:

"... we are providing notice of a security incident possibly affecting certain individuals who made payment card purchases at Trump International Hotel & Tower Las Vegas, located at 2000 Fashion Show Drive, Las Vegas, NV... Although an independent forensic investigation has not conclusively determined that any particular customer’s payment card information was taken from the Hotel’s payment card system or misused as a result of the incident, we are providing this notice out of an abundance of caution to inform potentially affected customers of the incident... it appears that there may have been unauthorized malware access to payment card information as it was inputted into the payment card systems... including payment card account number, card expiration date, security code, and cardholder name) of individuals who used a payment card at the Hotel between May 19, 2014, and June 2, 2015, may have been affected..."

It seems that payment information was stolen by malware installed within infected terminals. The breach notice also mentioned that the hotel is working with law enforcement, banks, and an independent forensic investigation vendor. All, pretty standard stuff. The notice did not disclose the total number of records or consumers affected.

The breach notice includes instructions for affected customers to sign up for one year of free fraud resolution and identity protection services with Experian ProtectMyID. The offer is only for U.S. residents who used a payment card at the Hotel between May 19, 2014, and June 2, 2015. (Since the hotel's website includes content in several languages besides English, I guess that deep-pocketed customers from other countries are simply screwed.) That duration seems skimpy, since many other corporations have offered two years. The breach notice lists a hotel toll-free number for affected customers to get assistance and ask questions.

A check this morning of the hotel's home page did not find a link to a breach notice. Typically, a well-organized post-breach response also includes a website providing affecting customers with more information (or dedicated pages at their main site).

So, there seems to be two massive failures in this data breach. The first was a failure to promptly detect the unauthorized access. The second was a lengthy delay of more than a year to notify affected consumers. And, the investigation is still underway so things could be even worse.

Note: the Krebs On Security blog first broke news in July about data breaches at several hotels, including the Trump hotel in Las Vegas. One wonders why the hotel didn't announce the breach then.


Apple Removes Apps Infected During Malware Attack

Mashable reported on Monday:

"Dozens of iOS apps in Apple's App Store were infected with malware in recent days, including hugely popular Chinese social networking apps, in what appears to be the first major case of hackers breaching Apple's highly controlled mobile software ecosystem."

Some of the popular apps affected:

"WeChat, which has more than 500 million users in all, said its app was affected by the issue but that it had already fixed the problem earlier this month. It said its version 6.2.5, released on Sept. 10, was infected, but version 6.2.6, released Sept. 12, was not..."

How the breach happened:

"Both the app developers and Apple were apparently unaware that the apps had been infected. Hackers succeeded by tricking the app developers into downloading a modified version of Xcode, the software that developers use to create iOS apps. This fake version of Xcode included the malware, which then made its way into the apps, which were then uploaded to the App Store."