143 posts categorized "Internet Access" Feed

DuckDuckGo Introduces New Privacy Browser

DuckDuckGo search engine for privacy Readers of this blog are familiar with DuckDuckGo, the popular search engine for privacy which doesn't track you nor maintain logs of your search queries. For even more online privacy, DuckDuckGo has has introduced a web browser mobile app for your smartphone or tablet. Benefits of this new browser app:

"1. Escape Advertising Tracker Networks: Our Privacy Protection will block all the hidden trackers we can find, exposing the major advertising networks tracking you over time, so that you can track who's trying to track you.
2. Increase Encryption Protection: We force sites to use an encrypted connection where available, protecting your data from prying eyes, like internet service providers (ISPs).
3. Search Privately: You share your most personal information with your search engine, like your financial, medical, and political questions. What you search for is your own business, which is why DuckDuckGo search doesn't track you. Ever.
4. Decode Privacy Policies — We’ve partnered with Terms of Service Didn't Read to include their scores and labels of website terms of service and privacy policies, where available."

The new browser app is available in the iTunes store and the Google Play store. The iPhone and iPad versions requires iOS version 9.0 or later. How it provides more privacy online:

"As you search and browse, the DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser shows you a Privacy Grade rating when you visit a website (A-F). This rating lets you see how protected you are at a glance, dig into the details to see who we caught trying to track you, and learn how we enhanced the underlying site's privacy measures. The Privacy Grade is scored automatically based on the prevalence of hidden tracker networks, encryption availability, and website privacy practices.

Our app provides standard browsing functionality including tabs, bookmarks, and autocomplete. In addition to strong Privacy Protection as described above, we also packed in some extra privacy features into the browser itself: a) Fire Button — Clear all your tabs and data with one tap; b) Application Lock: Secure the app with Touch ID or Face ID."

The Privacy Grade ratings reminds me of the warnings provided by the Privacy Badger add-on, which alerts consumers to the tracking mechanisms used by sites, and provides consumers finer control about which mechanisms to enable or disable at each site.


Burger King's Whopper Neutrality Ad. Sincere 'Net Neutrality' Support Or Slick Corporate Advertising?

If you haven't seen it, there is a Whopper Neutrality ad online by Burger King, explains net neutrality in a very easy-to-understand way. Blog post continues after the video:

A November, 2017 poll found that 52 percent of registered voters supported the current rules, including 55 percent of Democrats and 53 percent of Republicans. After that poll, the Commissioners at the FCC voted to killed net neutrality protections for consumers.

Some have questions whether the ad is sincere support of an issue consumers care about, or slick corporate advertising which capitalize on a hot topic. I like the ad. Anything that helps more consumers understand the issue, and what we've lost, is a good thing.

Another view of the ad by The Young Turks. Share your opinions below after the video:

Related posts about net neutrality:


Telecoms Fired Workers After Lobbying For, And Getting, Tax Cuts And Net Neutrality Repeal

Comcast logo Last week, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported:

"Managers, supervisors, and direct sales people in Chicago, Florida, and other parts of Comcast’s Central region, mostly in the Midwest and Southeastern United States, were terminated around Dec. 15... More than 500 sales employees were terminated, company sources said... Comcast has not reorganized the direct sales forces and approach in the company’s two other big divisions, which include Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Comcast/NBCUniversal employs about 159,000.

In late December, Comcast announced that it would hand out $1,000 bonuses to full-time employees, in response to the Trump tax cut that will slash its corporate tax rate. The fired employees will be eligible for a “$1,000 supplemental severance payment,” Comcast said... Comcast direct sales employees earned $50,000 to $100,000 through a low base salary and commissions, the terminated employee said. The commissions ranged between roughly $75 for a new Internet Plus customer to $350 for a new customer who ordered a triple-play package with home security, the former employee said. Internet Plus is a package of television and broadband services..."

Reportedly, fired employees received severance pay only if they accepted non-disclosure agreements. Also, Comcast fired about 405 workers in Georgia.

Context matters. Earlier this week, Vox reported in December before the tax bill was passed:

"... the prospect for a deal on tax reform looking promising, lobbying reached a pinnacle this year, with 2,065 groups pushing their cause, according to reports published by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. The efforts are employing more than 6,000 lobbyists, the nonpartisan Public Citizen counted. The four organizations that reported the most lobbying activity on tax issues so far this year are Fortune 500 companies with a huge stake in the outcome: Comcast, Microsoft, Altria Group (formerly Philip Morris), and NextEra Energy."

Many politicians have repeated claims that tax cuts will create new jobs, and that repeal of net neutrality rules would encourage investment by ISPs. And, after the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in December to repeal existing net neutrality rules, Comcast issued this statement:

"We commend Chairman Pai for his leadership and FCC Commissioners O’Reilly and Carr for their support in adopting the Restoring Internet Freedom Order, returning to a regulatory environment that allowed the Internet to thrive for decades by eliminating burdensome Title II regulations and opening the door for increased investment and digital innovation. Today’s action does not mark the ‘end of the Internet as we know it;’ rather it heralds in a new era of light regulation that will benefit consumers."

So, let's summarize events. After receiving two huge benefits (e.g., tax cuts, repeal of net neutrality rules), Comcast immediately terminated workers. Ars Technica asked Comcast why they fired workers when tax cuts were supposed to create new jobs:

"... Comcast gave us this statement but offered no further details: "Periodically, we reorganize groups of employees and adjust our sales tactics and talent. This change in the Central Division is an example of this practice and occurred in the context of our adding hundreds of frontline and sales employees. All these employees were offered generous severance and an opportunity to apply for other jobs at Comcast." "

One of the claims by corporate ISPs and by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has been that net neutrality rules killed infrastructure investments by telecoms. Ars analyzed this claim:

"The firings happened around December 15. On December 20, Comcast announced that, because of the pending tax cut and recent repeal of net neutrality rules, it would give "special bonuses" of $1,000 to more than 100,000 employees and invest more than $50 billion in infrastructure over the next five years. "With these investments, we expect to add thousands of new direct and indirect jobs," Comcast said at the time.

We examined Comcast's investment claims in an article on December 21. As it turns out, Comcast's annual investments already soared during the two-plus years that net neutrality rules were on the books, and the $50 billion amount could be achieved if those investments simply continued increasing by a modest amount."

AT&T logo So, a few workers received bigger bonuses while others lost their jobs. And, it is worse. AT&T fired about 700 workers after promising to increase investments by $1 billion of Congress passed the tax cuts bill. Congress did, and AT&T didn't wait to terminate workers.

One can conclude:

  1.  The investment claims, by ISPs and advocates of repealing net neutrality rules, were bogus,
  2. Voters either didn't pay attention or were duped by claims that net neutrality rules killed investments by telecoms,
  3. Voters were duped during the 2016 election into believing claims that tax cuts would create jobs,
  4. Voters accepted these job-creation promises without demanding any guarantees, and
  5. Tax cuts are being used to reward employees and managers with bigger bonuses.

The bigger bonuses are great, if you have a job. Regardless, we now see the results: tax cuts help companies and fewer jobs hurt workers. Repeal of net neutrality rules will hurt public libraries, the poor, and disabled persons. And, there's more to come as ISPs roll out their revised broadband services (with higher prices) without net neutrality rules.

Yes, this stinks. What do you think? Is this what you expected?


U.S. Senate Moves Closer To Vote On Net Neutrality

Yesterday, The Hill reported:

"A Senate bill that would reverse the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) decision to repeal net neutrality received its 30th co-sponsor on Monday, ensuring it will receive a vote on the Senate floor. Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) announced her support for the bill on Twitter, putting it over the top of a procedural requirement to bypass committee approval.

The bill, which is being pushed by Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.), would use Congress’s authority under the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to reverse the FCC’s rollback of its popular net neutrality rules... Under the CRA, if a joint resolution of disapproval bill has enough support it can bypass committee review and be fast-tracked to a floor vote... Lawmakers have 60 legislative days after the FCC submits its regulations to Congress to pass the CRA. The repeal order is currently awaiting approval from the Office of Management and Budget.

With Republicans in control of both the House and Senate, the bill faces long odds to win the simple majorities it needs to reach the president’s desk."


In The News: Net Neutrality And I've Been Mugged Blog

WERS interview, net neutralityOn Sunday, December 17, 2017, WERS Radio (88.9 FM), a college radio station in Boston, broadcast on Sunday an interview about net neutrality. The persons interviewed included myself and Nina Vyedin, of Indivisible Somerville.

You can listen to the interview on SoundCloud. The interviewer, Jonathon House, and I met during the December 7th demonstration in Boston to save net neutrality protections for consumers.

Related posts:


Net Neutrality: Massachusetts Joins Multi-State Lawsuit Against FCC. What Next?

The Attorney General (AG) for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is suing the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) after the FCC voted on December 14th to repeal existing net neutrality rules protecting consumers. Maura Healey, the Massachusetts AG, announced that her office has joined a multi-state lawsuit with the New York State AG:

"... joined New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman in announcing that they will be filing a multi-state lawsuit against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) over its vote to rollback net neutrality protections...The FCC recently issued a proposed final order rolling back net neutrality protections and on December 14th, voted 3-2 on party lines to implement the final order. On December 13th, AG Healey joined a coalition of 18 attorneys general in sending a letter to the FCC after reports emerged that nearly two million comments submitted in support of the agency were fake."

AG Healey said about the multi-state lawsuit:

"With the FCC vote, Americans will pay more for the internet and will have fewer options... The agency has completely failed to justify this decision and we will be suing to stand up for the free exchange of ideas and to keep the American people in control of internet access."

The December 13th letter to the FCC about fake comments was signed by AGs from California, District of Columbia, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and Washington. The AGs' letter stated, in part:

"One of the most important roles that we perform is to prosecute fraud. It is a role we take extremely seriously, and one that is essential to a fair marketplace... The ‘Restore Internet Freedom’ proposal, also known as net neutrality rollback (WC Docket No. 17- 108) has far-reaching implications for the everyday life of Americans... Recent attempts by New York Attorney General Schneiderman to investigate supposed comments received by the FCC have revealed a pattern of facts that should raise alarm bells for every American about the integrity of the democratic process. A careful review of the publicly available information revealed a pattern of fake submissions using the names of real people. In fact, there may be over one million fake submissions from across the country. This is akin to identity theft on a massive scale – and theft of someone’s voice in a democracy is particularly concerning.

As state Attorneys General, many of our offices have received complaints from consumers indicating their distress over their names being used in such a manner. While we will investigate these consumer complaints through our normal processes, we urge the Commission to take immediate action and to cooperate with law enforcement investigations. Woven throughout the Administrative Procedures Act is a duty for rulemakers to provide information to the public and to listen to the public. We know from advising our rulemakers at the state level that listening to the public provides insights from a diversity of viewpoints. But, if the well of public comment has been poisoned by falsified submissions, the Commission may be unable to rely on public comments that would help it reach a legitimate conclusion to the rulemaking process. Or, it must give less weight to the public comments submitted which also undermines the process..."

The FCC ignored the AGs' joint letter about fraud and proceeded with its net-neutrality vote on December 14. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai had blown off the identity theft and fraud charges as maneuvers by desperate net neutrality advocates.

California AG Xavier Becerra said:

"... the FCC failed to do what is right... The FCC decided that consumers do not deserve free, open, and equal access to the internet. It decided to ignore the millions of Americans who voiced their strong support for our existing net neutrality rules. Here in California – a state that is home to countless start-ups and technology giants alike – we know that a handful of powerful companies should not dictate the sources for the information we seek..."

Residents in some states can use special sites to notify their state's AG about the misuse of their identity data in fake comments submitted to the FCC: Pennsylvania, New York.

The FCC under Chairman Pai seems to listen and respond to the needs of corporate internet service providers (ISPs), and not to consumers. A November 21 - 25 poll found that 52 percent of registered voters support the current rules, including 55 percent of Democrats and 53 percent of Republicans.

While that is down from prior polls, a majority support net neutrality rules. A poll by Mozilla and Ipsos in June, 2017 found overwhelming support across party lines: 76% of Americans, 81% of Democrats, and 73% of Republicans favor keeping net neutrality rules. The poll included approximately 1,000 American adults across the U.S. with 354 Democrats, 344 Republicans, and 224 Independents.

Before the FCC affirmed net neutrality rules in 2015, a poll by the Center for Political Communication at the University of Delaware in 2014 found strong and widespread support:

"... About 81 percent of Americans oppose allowing Internet providers like Comcast and Verizon to charge Web sites and services more if they want to reach customers more quickly... Republicans were slightly more likely to support net neutrality than Democrats. 81 percent of Democrats and 85 percent of Republicans in the survey said they opposed fast lanes."

Experts have debated the various ways of moving forward after the December 14th FCC vote. Wired reported:

"Most immediately, the activity will move to the courts... The most likely argument: that the commission’s decision violates federal laws barring agencies from crafting “arbitrary and capricious” regulations. After all, the FCC’s net neutrality rules were just passed in 2015... as capricious as the current FCC's about-face may seem, legal experts say the challenges won’t be a slam-dunk case. Federal agencies are allowed to change their minds about previous regulations, so long as they adequately explain their reasoning... The FCC's main argument for revoking the 2015 rules is that the regulations hurt investment in broadband infrastructure. But, as WIRED recently detailed, many broadband providers actually increased their investments, while those that cut back on spending told shareholders that the net neutrality rules didn't affect their plans. University of Pennsylvania Law School professor Christopher Yoo says courts generally defer to an agency's expertise in interpreting evidence submitted into the record... net neutrality advocates could also argue that the agency's decision-making process was corrupted by the flood of fake comments left by bots. But FCC Chair AJit Pai will argue that the agency discarded low-quality and repeated comments and focused only on matters of substance... A long-term solution to net neutrality will require Congress to pass laws that won't change every time control of the White House passes to another party... Senator John Thune (R-South Dakota) recently called for Congress to pass bipartisan net neutrality legislation. In 2015, Thune and Representative Fred Upton (R-Michigan) introduced a bill that would have banned blocking or slowing legal content, but limited the FCC's authority over internet service providers. It never moved forward. Thune is clearly hoping that growing demand from the public for net neutrality protections will bring more Republicans to the table... Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) told WIRED earlier this year that he won't support a bill with weaker protections than the 2015 rules..."

President Trump appointed Pai as FCC Chairman in January, giving the Republican commissioners at the FCC a voting majority. Neither the President nor the White House staff said anything in its daily e-mail blast or in their website about the FCC vote; and instead discussed tax reform, general remarks about reducing regulation, and infrastructure (e.g., roads, bridges, tunnels).

Seems to me the internet is a key component of our country's infrastructure. What are your opinions? If your state isn't in the above list, we'd like to hear from you, too.


FCC Action To Kill Net Neutrality Will Likely Hurt Public Libraries, The Poor, And The Disabled

American Library Association logo Jim Neal, the president of the American Library Association, released a statement condemning the December 14th vote by the Republican-led U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to kill net neutrality protections for internet users:

"The majority of the FCC has just dealt a blow to equitable access to online information and services which puts libraries, our patrons, and America’s communities at risk... By rolling back essential and enforceable net neutrality protections, the FCC has enabled commercial interests at the expense of the public who depends on the internet as their primary means of information gathering, learning, and communication. We will continue to fight the FCC’s decision and advocate for strong, enforceable net neutrality protections."

New York Public Library logo The Verge interviewed New York Public Library (NYPL) president Tony Marx, and Greg Cam the NYPL director of information policy. During 2017, the NYPL provided 3.1 million computer sessions across all branches (using 4,700 computers), plus 3 million wireless sessions. Based upon that activity, Marx said:

"... the simple fact is that the poorest of New York rely on the library as the only place they can go and get free use of computers and free Wi-Fi. It’s one of the reasons why the library is the most visited civic institution in New York. We have also, in recent years, been lending people what we call hot spots, which are Wi-Fi boxes they can take home, typically for a year. That gives them digital access at home — broadband access — which something like 2 million New Yorkers can’t afford and don’t have..."

And, New York City is one of the more prosperous areas of the country. It makes one wonder how citizens in poor or rural areas; or in areas without any public libraries will manage. Disabled users will also be negatively affected by the FCC vote. Marx explained:

"... the New York Public Library runs the Andrew Heiskell Library for the visually impaired. I believe it is a three-state depository, so it plays a role in getting access in all the ways you described — not just in New York City but way beyond. A lot of that now happens online and it could simply stop working, which means they’re gonna cut people off completely."

Cram explained the wide range of tasks people use the internet for at public libraries:

"Our users depend on the library, and libraries in general, for things like completing homework assignments, locating e-government resources, e-government services, accessing oral histories and primary source materials. Things that are resource-intensive like video and audio and image collections are dependent on a free and open internet. Also things like applying and interviewing for jobs. More and more jobs involve a first round of interviews that are done over the internet. If we have to put things in the slow lane, we’re worried about those interview services being downgraded."

"Slow lanes" are one of about five possible consequences by the FCC decision to kill net neutrality. Marx summarized the concerns of many library managers:

"We live in a world where access to information is essential for opportunity, for learning, for success, for civic life, for checking facts. Anything that reduces that, particularly for people who can’t afford alternatives, is a body blow to the basic democratic principles that the library stands for. Whether people or the library are shoved to the slow lane, and/or forced to pay to be in the fast lane with resources that are already stretched thin, is really sort of shocking. To put it sort of bluntly, the FCC should be defending communications."

Basically, internet access is a utility like water or electricity; something corporate providers have long denied and fought. Everyone needs and uses broadband internet. What are your opinions?


Doug Jones Wins In Alabama, Net Neutrality, And The FCC

[7:30 am EST] Congratulations to Doug Jones and his supporters for a stunning victory Tuesday in a special election in Alabama for the open U.S. Senate seat. His victory speech is available online. Late last month, Doug Jones tweeted this:

Later today, the commissioners at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will likely vote during their December 2017 Open Commission Meeting to kill net neutrality rules protecting consumers free and open internet access. The planned vote comes despite clear and mounting evidence of widespread identity theft by unknown persons to submit fake comments distorting and polluting FCC record and website soliciting feedback from the public.

Yesterday, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel released the following press release:

"Upon receipt of a letter from New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman stating that it now appears that two million Americans’ identities may have been misused in the FCC record and a separate letter from 18 State Attorneys General calling on the FCC to delay its net neutrality vote because of its “tainted” record, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel released the following statement:

“This is crazy. Two million people have had their identities stolen in an effort to corrupt our public record. Nineteen State Attorneys General from across the country have asked us to delay this vote so they can investigate. And yet, in less than 24 hours we are scheduled to vote on wiping out our net neutrality protections. We should not vote on any item that is based on this corrupt record. I call on my colleagues to delay this vote so we can get to the bottom of this mess.” "

Despite the widespread identity theft and fraud, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has maintained his position to proceed with a vote today to kill net neutrality protections for consumers. President Trump appointed Pai as FCC Chairman in January, giving the Republican commissioners a majority when voting. Pai has blown off the identity theft and fraud charges as maneuvers by desperate net neutrality advocates.

[Update at 2:20 pm EST: earlier today, the FCC commissioners voted along party lines to kill existing net neutrality rules protecting consumers.]


Was Your Identity Information Misused To Submit Fake Comments To The FCC About Net Neutrality?

After creating a webpage specifically to help New York State residents determine if their identifies were misued for net neutrality comments, Attorney General Schneiderman announced:

"In the last five days alone, over 3,200 people have reported misused identities to the Attorney General’s office, including nearly 350 New Yorkers from across the state. Attorney General Schneiderman urges New Yorkers to continue to check whether their identity was misused and report it to his office in order to inform the investigation."

The webpage automatically links to only net neutrality (Docket 17-108) comments with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC)  site. So, at least 3,200 persons have confirmed the misuse of their identity information by unknown persons (or bots) to pollute feedback by the public about net neutrality rules protecting consumers' broadband freedoms. You'd think that FCC Chairman Ajit Pai would be concerned about the pollution and fraud; and would delay the upcoming December 14th vote regarding net neutrality. But he's not and blew off the fake comments allegations, as explained in this earlier blog post.

You might think that Chairman Pai and the FCC would be concerned about pollution and fraud in feedback submitted to the FCC site, given the massive Equifax data breach in September which exposed the data elements (e.g., name, street addresses) criminals and fraudsters could easily use to submit fake comments.

This makes one wonder if the FCC can be trusted under Chairman Pai's leadership. Hopefully, Attorneys General in other states will provide similar webpages to help residents in their states... and not only for comments about net neutrality.

Being curious, I visited the webpage by AG Schneiderman. It instructed:

"The Office of the New York State Attorney General is investigating whether public comments regarding net neutrality rules wrongfully used New Yorkers’ identities without their consent. We encourage you to search the FCC’s public comment website and tell us if you see any comments that misuse your name and address.

First, search below to find any comments that may have misused your identity. If results appear, click on any comment that uses your name, and when the comment appears review the name, the address, and the comment text. (If no results appear, your identity most likely was not misused.)"

You don't need to be a New York State resident to use this online tool. My initial search produced 1,046, so I narrowed it by entering my name in quotations ("George Jenkins") for a more precise match. That second search produced 40 comments about net neutrality (e.g., Docket 17-108), a manageable number. I browsed the list which included my valid comment submitted during May, 2017.

I did not see any other comments using my name and address. That's good because I only submitted one comment. I noticed comments by persons with the same name in other states. That seems okay. It's reasonable to expect multiple persons with the same name in a country with a population of about 360 million people.

I did not check the addresses of the other persons with the same name. I realize that could easily hide synthetic ID-theft. In traditional synthetic ID-theft, criminals mix stolen (valid) Social Security numbers with other persons' names to avoid detection. In the ECFS comments system, one could enter valid names with fake addresses; or vice-versa. I hope that AG Schneiderman's fraud analysis also checks for both types of synthetic ID-theft: 1) fake names at real addresses, and 2) real names at fake addresses.

If I had found fraudulent entries, I would have notified AG Schneiderman, the Attorney General's office in the state where I live, and the FCC.

Did you check for misuse of your identity information? What did you find?


Photos: December 7 Demonstration In Boston To Keep Net Neutrality

Demonstrations occurred nationwide on December 7 to save net neutrality. Citizens took to the streets to keep our internet services open. About 200 persons attended the demonstration in Boston on Boylston Street. It was encouraging to meet several students from local universities participating in the event. They understand the issue and its seriousness. Several A.C.L.U. members also participated:

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4910

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4897

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality. Image 4904

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4900

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4905

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4908

Boylston Street, Boston. December 7, 2017. Keep net neutrality demonstration. Image 4906

Browse photos from other demonstrations nationwide on December 7. Contact your elected officials in Congress, and learn about the next day of action on December 12, 2017. More resources:


Futurism: Your Life Without Net Neutrality Protections

Federal communications Commission logo You've probably heard that Ajit Pai, the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), is leading his agency towards a vote on December 14, 2017 to kill net neutrality. How will consumers' online lives change? Futurism described what your online life will be like without net neutrality:

"You’re at work and want to check Facebook on your lunch break to see how your sister is doing. This is not exactly a straightforward task, as your company uses Verizon. You’re not about to ask your boss if they’d consider putting up the extra cash every month so that you can access social media in the office, so you’ll have to wait until you get home.

That evening, you log in to pay your monthly internet bill — or rather, bills.

See, there’s the baseline internet cost, but without net neutrality, you also have to pay a separate monthly fee for social media, another for "leisure" pages like Reddit and Imgur, and another still for liberal-leaning news sites — because your provider’s CEO is politically conservative. Not only is your bill confusing, you’re not sure you can really afford to access all these websites that, at one point in time, you took for granted.

In addition to the sites you can access if you pay for them, there are also websites that have just become lost to you. Websites that you once frequented, but that now, you aren’t even sure how to access anymore. You can’t even pay to access them. You used to like reading strange Wikipedia articles late at night and cruising for odd documentaries — but now, all those interests that once entertained and educated you in your precious and minimal free time are either behind yet another separately provided paywall or blocked entirely. You’ve started to ask around, see if your friends or coworkers with other providers have better access... but the story is pretty much always the same."

Net neutrality meme highlighting blocked content. Click to view larger version In short, without net neutrality:

  1. You will lose the freedom to use the internet bandwidth you've purchased monthly as you desire;
  2. Corporate internet service providers (ISPs) increase their their revenues and profits by adding tolls to each package in a sliced-and-diced approach to internet content;
  3. Your internet bill will become just as confusing, frustrating, and expensive as your cable-TV bill, where ISPs force you to buy several expensive packages of sites in order to access your favorite sites;
  4. The new, expensive tolls allow ISPs to decide what internet content you see and don't see. Sites or content producers unwilling to pay fees to ISPs will find their content blocked or relegated to "slow" speed lanes; and
  5. Both middle-class and poor online users will bear the brunt of the price increases.

If you think this can't happen in the United States, consider:

"Some countries are already living this reality. In New Zealand, Vodafone offers mobile internet packages that are comprised of different types of services. You might have to pay a certain amount to access social apps like Snapchat and Instagram, and a separate fee to chat with friends via Facebook Messenger and iMessage. A similar framework is used by Portugal’s MEO, where messaging, social media, music streaming, video streaming, and email are also split into separate packages.

Long ago, FCC Chairman Pai made his position clear. Breitbart News reported on April 28, 2017:

"Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai told Breitbart News in an exclusive interview that an open and free internet is vital for America in the 21st century. During a speech at the Newseum on Wednesday, Pai said he plans to roll back the net-neutrality regulations and to restore the light-touch regulatory system established by President Bill Clinton and Congressional Republicans by the 1996 Telecommunications Act... Chairman Pai said during his speech that the internet prospered before net neutrality was enacted... Breitbart News asked the FCC chief why he thinks that net neutrality is a problem, and why we must eliminate the rule. He said: "Number one there was no problem to solve, the internet wasn’t broken in 2015. In that situation, it doesn’t seem me that preemptive market-wide regulation is necessary. Number two, even if there was a problem, this wasn’t the right solution to adopt. These Title II regulations were inspired during the Great Depression to regulate Ma Bell which was a telephone monopoly. And the broadband market we have is very different from the telephone market of 1934. So, it seems to me that if you have 4,462 internet service providers and if a few of them are behaving in a way that is anti-competitive or otherwise bad for consumer welfare then you take targeted action to deal with that. You don’t declare the entire market anti-competitive and treat everyone as if they are a monopolist. Going forward we are going to propose eliminating that Title II classification and figure out the right way forward. The bottom line is, everyone agrees on the principles of a free and open internet what we disagree with is how many regulations are needed to preserve the internet." "

Note the language. Pai uses "free and open internet" to refer to freedoms for ISPs to do what they want; a slick attempt to co-opt language net neutrality proponentsused for freedoms for consumers go online where they want without additional fees. Pai's "Light touch" means fewer regulations for ISPS regardless of the negative consequences upon consumers. Pai's comments in April attempted to spin existing net neutrality laws as antiquated ("the telephone market of 1934"), when, in fact, net neutrality was established recently... in 2010. Even the same Breitbart News article admitted this:

"Net neutrality passed under former Democrat Tom Wheeler’s FCC in 2010."

Pai's exaggerations and falsehoods are astounding. Plenty of bogus claims by Pai and net neutrality critics. In January of this year, President Donald Trump appointed Ajit Pai, a former lawyer with Verizon, as the FCC Chairman. Earlier this year, CNN reported:

"More than 1,000 startups and investors have now signed an open letter to Pai opposing the proposal. The Internet Association, a trade group representing bigger companies like Facebook, Google, and Amazon, has also condemned the plan. "The current FCC rules are working for consumers and the protections need to be kept in tact," Michael Beckerman, president and CEO of the Internet Association, said at a press conference Wednesday."

Regular readers of this blog are aware that more than "a few" ISPs committed abused consumers and content producers. (A prior blog post listed many historical problems and abuses of consumers by some ISPs.) Also, consider this: Pai made his net-neutrality position clear long before the public submitted comments to the FCC this past summer. Sounds like he never really intended to listen to comments from the public. Not very open minded.

As bad it all of this sounds, it's even worse. How? An FCC Commissioner, 28 U.S. senators, and the New York State Attorney General (AG) have lobbied FCC Chairman Pai to delay the net neutrality vote planned by the FCC on December 14, due to clear and convincing evidence of the massive fraud of comments submitted to the FCC's online commenting system.

In short, the FCC's online comments system is corrupted, hacked, and unreliable. The group (e.g., FCC commissioner, 28 Senators, and NY State AG) also objects to the elimination of net neutrality on the merits.

The fraud evidence is pretty damning, but Chairman Pai seems intent upon going ahead with a vote to kill net neutrality despite the comments fraud. Why? How? Ars Technica reported on December 4th:

"FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says that net neutrality rules aren't needed because the Federal Trade Commission can protect consumers from broadband providers... When contacted by Ars, Pai's office issued this statement in response to the [delay request] letter: "This is just evidence that supporters of heavy-handed Internet regulations are becoming more desperate by the day as their effort to defeat Chairman Pai's plan to restore Internet freedom has stalled. The vote will proceed as scheduled on December 14."

I find the whole process deeply disturbing. First, only 28 U.S. Senators seem concerned about the massive comments fraud. Why aren't all 100 concerned? Second, why aren't any House members concerned? Third, President Trump hasn't said anything about it. (This makes one wonder if POTUS45 either doesn't care consumers are hurt, or is asleep at the wheel.) Elected officials in positions of responsibility seem willing to ignore valid concerns.

Logo-verizon-protestsMany consumers are concerned, and protests to keep net neutrality are scheduled for later today outside Verizon stores nationwide. What do you think?


'Tens Of Thousands' Of Fake Comments Submitted. New York State Attorney General Demands Answers From the FCC

Just before the Thanksgiving holiday, the attorney general for the New York State sent an open letter to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about fake comments submitted to the agency's online comments system. Eric T. Schneiderman directed his letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. It read in part:

"Recent press reports suggest that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), under your leadership, soon will release rules to dismantle your agency’s existing “net neutrality” protections under Title II of the Communications Act, which shield the public from anti-consumer behaviors of the giant cable companies that provide high-speed internet to most people... Yet the process the FCC has employed to consider potentially sweeping alterations to current net neutrality rules has been corrupted by the fraudulent use of Americans’ identities — and the FCC has been unwilling to assist my office in our efforts to investigate this unlawful activity.

Specifically, for six months my office has been investigating who perpetrated a massive scheme to corrupt the FCC’s notice and comment process through the misuse of enormous numbers of real New Yorkers’ and other Americans’ identities. Such conduct likely violates state law— yet the FCC has refused multiple requests for crucial evidence in its sole possession that is vital to permit that law enforcement investigation to proceed.

In April 2017, the FCC announced that it would issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking concerning repeal of its existing net neutrality rules. Federal law requires the FCC and all federal agencies to take public comments on proposed rules into account — so it is important that the public comment process actually enable the voices of the millions of individuals and businesses who will be affected to be heard. That’s important no matter one’s position on net neutrality, environmental rules, and so many other areas in which federal agencies regulate.

In May 2017, researchers and reporters discovered that the FCC’s public comment process was being corrupted by the submission of enormous numbers of fake comments concerning the possible repeal of net neutrality rules. In doing so, the perpetrator or perpetrators attacked what is supposed to be an open public process by attempting to drown out and negate the views of the real people, businesses, and others who honestly commented on this important issue. Worse, while some of these fake comments used made up names and addresses, many misused the real names and addresses of actual people... My office analyzed the fake comments and found that tens of thousands of New Yorkers may have had their identities misused in this way... Impersonation and other misuse of a person’s identity violates New York law, so my office launched an investigation... So in June 2017, we contacted the FCC to request certain records related to its public comment system that were necessary to investigate which bad actor or actors were behind the misconduct. We made our request for logs and other records at least 9 times over 5 months: in June, July, August, September, October (three times), and November.

We reached out for assistance to multiple top FCC officials, including you, three successive acting FCC General Counsels, and the FCC’s Inspector General. We offered to keep the requested records confidential, as we had done when my office and the FCC shared information and documents as part of past investigative work. Yet we have received no substantive response to our investigative requests. None."

According to an analysis by the New York State AG's office, "tens of thousands" of fraudulent comment were submitted affecting residents not only in New York but also in California, Georgia, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas. Clearly, this is both very troubling and unacceptable.

The FCC is supposed to accept comments without tampering and to weigh comments submitted by the public (e.g., consumers, businesses, technology experts, legal experts, etc.) equally to arrive at a decision based upon the majority of comments. If a sizeable portion of the comments submitted were fraudulent, then any FCC decision to kill net neutrality is (at best) both flawed and in error; and (at worst) illegal and undermines both the process and the public's trust.

AG Schneiderman's letter to the FCC is also available on the Medium site. It is most puzzling that the FCC and Chairman Pai have refused data requests since June. What are they hiding? The FCC must balance often competing needs of consumers and industry.

Consumers are very concerned about plans by the FCC to kill net neutrality. Consumers are concerned that their internet needs are not being addressed by the FCC, and that our monthly broadband costs will rise. There is so much concerns that protests are scheduled for December 7th outside Verizon stores. Killing net neutrality may be great for telecom and providers' profits, but it's bad for consumers.

Clearly, the FCC should not make any decisions regarding net neutrality, or any other business, until the fake comments allegations have been answered and resolved. And, an investigation should happen soon. As AG Schneiderman wrote:

"We all have a powerful reason to hold accountable those who would steal Americans’ identities and assault the public’s right to be heard in government rulemaking. If law enforcement can’t investigate and (where appropriate) prosecute when it happens on this scale, the door is open for it to happen again and again."

Democracy and consumers lose if the FCC kills net neutrality. What do you think?


Experts Find Security Flaw In Wireless Encryption Software. Most Mobile Devices At Risk

Researchers have found a new security vulnerability which places most computers, smartphones, and wireless routers at risk. The vulnerability allows hackers to decrypt and eavesdrop on victims' wireless network traffic; plus inject content (e.g., malware) into users' wireless data streams. ZDNet reported yesterday:

"The bug, known as "KRACK" for Key Reinstallation Attack, exposes a fundamental flaw in WPA2, a common protocol used in securing most modern wireless networks. Mathy Vanhoef, a computer security academic, who found the flaw, said the weakness lies in the protocol's four-way handshake, which securely allows new devices with a pre-shared password to join the network... The bug represents a complete breakdown of the WPA2 protocol, for both personal and enterprise devices -- putting every supported device at risk."

Reportedly, the vulnerability was confirmed on Monday by U.S. Homeland Security's cyber-emergency unit US-CERT, which had warned vendors about two months ago.

What should consumers do? Experts advise consumers to update the software in all mobile devices connected to their home wireless router. Obviously, that means first contacting the maker of your home wireless router, or your Internet Service Provider (ISP), for software patches to fix the security vulnerability.

ZDNet also reported that the security flaw:

"... could also be devastating for IoT devices, as vendors often fail to implement acceptable security standards or update systems in the supply chain, which has already led to millions of vulnerable and unpatched Internet-of-things (IoT) devices being exposed for use by botnets."

So, plenty of home devices must also be updated. That includes both devices you'd expect (e.g., televisions, printers, smart speakers and assistants, security systems, door locks and cameras, utility meters, hot water heaters, thermostats, refrigerators, robotic vacuum cleaners, lawn mowers) and devices you might not expect (e.g., mouse traps, wine bottlescrock pots, toy dolls, and trash/recycle bins). One "price" of wireless convenience is the responsibility for consumers and device makers to continually update the security software in internet-connected devices. Nobody wants their home router and devices participating in scammers' and fraudsters' botnets with malicious software.

ZDNet also listed software patches by vendor. And:

"In general, Windows and newer versions of iOS are unaffected, but the bug can have a serious impact on Android 6.0 Marshmallow and newer... At the time of writing, neither Toshiba and Samsung responded to our requests for comment..."

Hopefully, all of the Internet-connected devices in your home provide for software updates. If not, then you probably have some choices ahead: whether to keep that device or upgrade to better device for security. Comments?


Here Comes The Post-Equifax-Breach Spam From Scammers

If you haven't received them yet, you probably will soon. Here comes the spam - unwanted e-mail messages - from scammers, supposedly related to the massive Equifax data breach. The spam will likely include phishing attacks: attempts to trick consumers into disclosing sensitive bank account and payment data.

What might this spam look like? The spam filter by my e-mail provider recently trapped the message below in my spam folder:

Suspected spam email. Click to view larger version

The sender's intent is to clearly leverage consumers' anxieties and fears about the massive, horrific Equifax breach. The e-mail message also states:

Suspected spam email. Click to view larger version

The message offers both three free credit scores and free credit reports. The problems I see with this e-mail:

  1. The message doesn't list a price for its offer. The company name -- FreeCreditClick -- implies the offer is free.
  2. Key items in the e-mail don't match. The company name in the "From" field doesn't match the e-mail address. Nor does the company name in the "From" field match the company name in the body of the message.
  3. The sender's e-mail address in the "From" field includes a version of an e-mail address I've seen before in other spam.
  4. The Equifax site already directs consumers affected by the data breach to an Equifax site to learn how to get protection (e.g., credit monitoring and fraud resolution services) for free.
  5.  The e-mail offers credit reports from the three major credit reporting agencies: Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. Informed consumers know that the official website for free credit reports is annualcreditreport.com.
  6. Informed consumers know that while there are several brands of credit scores, they probably need a single good one.
  7. The e-mail contains order and unsubscribe links with destinations that doesn't match either the company's name in "1" nor "2."

To understand #7, I reviewed the underlying HTML markup language used to create this e-mail message:

HTML markup of the suspected spam email. Click to view larger version

The destinations for both the order link (A) and the unsubscribe link (B) contain the "proffbuilder.com" site and embedded redirect commands. The redirect commands could take your web browser anywhere. Too risky, so I did not click on them.

As best I can tell, this definitely is spam. I don't trust it. What do you think?


FCC: You Really Don't Need High-Speed Internet Services

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) seeks to lower key internet standards: the minimum download and upload speeds for services to qualify as high-speed internet (a/k/a broadband). What the heck you ask? Sadly, this is no joke.

First, some background. Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act requires the FCC to determine whether broadband services are deployed to all Americans in a reasonable and timely manner. In 2015, the FCC raised the standard after a 2015 report found that that broadband deployment wasn't keeping pace in the United States with its citizens needs nor with the rest of the planet:

"Congress directed us to evaluate annually "whether advanced telecommunications capability is being deployed to all Americans in a reasonable and timely fashion." For a service to be considered advanced, it must enable Americans "to originate and receive high-quality voice, data, graphics, and video telecommunications." We can no longer conclude that broadband at speeds of 4 megabits per second (Mbps) download and 1 Mbps upload (4 Mbps/1 Mbps)—a benchmark established in 2010 and relied on in the last three Reports—supports the “advanced” functions Congress identified. Trends in deployment and adoption, the speeds that providers are offering today, and the speeds required to use high-quality video, data, voice, and other broadband applications all point at a new benchmark. The average household has more than 2.5 people, and for family households, the average household size is as high as 4.3... we find that, having “advanced telecommunications capability” requires access to actual download speeds of at least 25 Mbps and actual upload speeds of at least 3 Mbps (25 Mbps/3 Mbps)... Although public- and private-sector initiatives continue to advance deployment, these advances are not occurring broadly enough or quickly enough. Recent data show that approximately 55 million Americans (17 percent) live in areas unserved by fixed 25 Mbps/3 Mbps broadband or higher service, and that gap closed only by three percentage points in the last year... Americans living in rural areas and on Tribal lands disproportionately lack access to broadband. Our data show that 25 Mbps/3 Mbps capability is unavailable to 8 percent of Americans living in urban areas, compared to 53 percent of Americans living in rural areas and 63 percent of Americans living on Tribal lands and in the U.S. Territories. The gap between those with and without access declined by only 2 percent in rural areas..."

Note: the FCC phrase "advanced telecommunications capability" equals broadband. The vote in 2015 by FCC commissioners to raise the standard was 3-2 along party lines. (Democrats held a majority.) Third, the FCC released a Fact Sheet on January 7, 2016 which (again) highlighted the broadband deployment shortfalls:

"While the nation continues to make progress in broadband deployment, advanced telecommunications capability is not being deployed in a reasonable and timely fashion to all Americans. Factors leading to this conclusion are as follows: a) Approximately 34 million Americans still lack access to fixed broadband at the FCC’s benchmark speed of 25 Mbps for downloads, 3 Mbps for uploads; b) A persistent urban-rural digital divide has left 39 percent of the rural population without access to fixed broadband. By comparison, only 4 percent living in urban areas lack access. 10 percent lack access nationwide; c) 41 percent of Tribal Lands residents lack access; d) 41 percent of schools have not met the Commission’s short-term goal of 100 Mbps per 1,000 students/staff. These schools educate 47 percent of the nation’s students... Internationally, the U.S. continues to lag behind a number of other developed nations, ranking 16th out of 34 countries."

16th place is not American excellence. Not even close. We can and should do much better. The Fact Sheet also concluded that everyone needs both fixed and mobile internet access:

"Fixed and mobile service offer distinct functions meeting both complementary and distinct needs: a) Fixed broadband offers high -speed, high-capacity connections capable of supporting bandwidth-intensive uses, such as streaming video, by multiple users in a household; b) But fixed broadband can’t provide consumers with the mobile Internet access required to support myriad needs outside the home and while working remotely.

Mobile devices provide access to the web while on the go, and are especially useful for real-time two-way interactions, mapping applications, and social media. But consumers who rely solely on mobile broadband tend to perform a more limited range of tasks and are significantly more likely to incur additional usage fees or forgo use of the Internet."

We all need fast, wired internet at home, at work, and in school. We all need fast, wireless internet when traveling on business, vacation, or working away from the office or school. Sensible.

On Thursday, Jessica Rosenworcel, one of the commissioners at the FCC, posted on Twitter:

What gives? Last month, the FCC filed a Notice of Inquiry (a/k/a "Inquiry Concerning Deployment of Advanced Telecommunications Capability to All Americans in a Reasonable and Timely Fashion" - document #17-109A1) which attempts to consolidate the fixed and mobile broadband speeds into a single standard:

"...We propose to incorporate both fixed and mobile advanced telecommunications services into our Section 706 inquiry... According to the Pew Research Center, the percentage of Americans subscribing to fixed broadband has reached an all-time high of approximately 73 percent. At the same time, 13 percent of Americans across all demographic groups are relying solely on smartphones for home internet access. Given that Americans use both fixed and mobile broadband technologies, we seek comment on whether we should evaluate the deployment of fixed and mobile broadband as separate and distinct ways to achieve advanced telecommunications capability... Alternatively, we seek comment on whether we should evaluate the deployment based on the presence of both fixed and mobile services... We seek comment on the appropriate benchmark for fixed advanced telecommunications capability. Should we maintain the 25 Mbps download, 3 Mbps upload (25 Mbps/3 Mbps) speed benchmark, and to apply it to all forms of fixed broadband?... The [FCC] has not previously set a mobile speed benchmark... Should the Commission set a mobile speed benchmark, and if so, what it should be? We anticipate that any speed benchmark we set would be lower than the 25 Mbps/3 Mbps benchmark adopted for fixed broadband services, given differing capabilities of mobile broadband... We seek comment on whether a mobile speed benchmark of 10 Mbps/1 Mbps is appropriate for mobile broadband services. Would a download speed benchmark higher or lower than 10 Mbps be appropriate for the purpose of assessing American consumers’ access to advanced telecommunications capability?"

A subsequent FCC document extended the comment period. The first deadline for the public -- you -- to submit comments ended Thursday, September 21, 2017. The next deadline for comments is October 6, 2017. You can still submit comments to the FCC until October 6 during the reply comment period (Filing 17-199).

To recap the decision: the FCC could use two different standards (one for fixed internet and a second for wireless internet), or go with a lower, lower standard which (supposedly) accommodates both.

Some readers are probably wondering: a lower broadband standard seems like taking the country backwards. During both the 2016 campaign and after entering office, President Trump promised to improve the country's crumbling infrastructure. Faster internet seems to be a pretty damn important part of the country's infrastructure. And, President Trump appointed Ajit Pai as the new Chairman at the FCC, which gave Republicans a majority of the voting commissioners.

Ars Technica reported:

"Democratic Commissioner Mignon Clyburn objected to parts of the Notice of Inquiry when it was released, saying that the home broadband speed standard should be raised and that mobile should not be considered a substitute for home Internet... Rosenworcel didn't make an official statement when the Notice of Inquiry was released because she wasn't on the commission at that time; she was sworn in for a new term just days later. She previously served on the FCC before a temporary departure caused by political haggling in the Senate."

Rosenworcel released a statement:

"... It’s time to dream big. This is the country that put a man on the moon. We invented the Internet. We can do audacious things — if we set big goals. So I believe we need big broadband goals... I am glad that last year we upped the ante and changed that threshold to 25 Megabits. I support the continued use of this standard today. But I think we need to go big and be bold. I think our new threshold should be 100 Megabits — and Gigabit speed should be in our sights. I believe anything short of goals like this shortchanges our children, our future, and our digital economy."

I agree with Rosenworcel. Moreover, the Pai-led FCC seems intent upon doing what corporate broadband services demand: roll back privacy, roll back net neutrality, and next a lower broadband standards. In 2015, Pai (then a commissioner) opposed the increase in standards.

The skeptic in me worries that a lower, slower standard allows corporate broadband providers to rely solely upon wireless to serve consumers and businesses -- especially those in rural areas. A single, lower standard allows broadband providers to take the foot off the gas pedal of building out the fixed broadband infrastructure -- the fiber-optic and other cabling we all use and need. In this scenario, consumers (yet again) take it on the chin with slower wireless speeds compared to a built-out fixed broadband infrastructure.

Those supporting a single, lower, slower broadband standard might as well yell: "We are number 16. Yeah!" What do you think?


A Greater Volume Of Bogus Email Messages

Have you checked your e-mail spam folder? Your e-mail provider's spam filter is a highly valuable tool which identifies and collects bogus, unwanted messages; which often either contain malware or link to sites which do. I happily use my e-mail provider's spam tool. It saves me plenty of time and aggravation.

You don't have to read the messages collected in your spam folder by your e-mail service. I do occasionally because I've taken my online security a step further. I configured the spam filter to trap all inbound messages not in my e-mail address book, and not only the messages it identified as spam. For me, nothing gets through unless I already know you. I don't want any of this garbage downloaded to my laptop's hard drive.

Call me extra careful.

Recently, when I scanned my spam folder I found a flood of messages up from three or five daily to 30 or 40. The subject lines of the bogus messages included a wide variety of offers: timeshare rentals, hair removal products, credit scores, credit cards, dating services, pet products, wrinkle removal products, home refinance loans, ink for computer printers, and much more. Often, the bogus messages pretended to be valid businesses, such as Amazon and Walmart. A partial list of the messages in my spam folder:

Partial list of messages in a spam folder. Click to view a larger version

Clearly, the spammers hope to trick users into opening these messages. Don't. Experts advise consumers not to reply to these bogus e-mails. If you do, you'll only get more.

If you know where to look, it's fairly easy to spot the spam. All of the messages include the same e-mail reply address. In this instance it is contact@cron-job.org. Unfortunately, Cron-Job is a valid business which did not send out this spam. According to the Denver Post:

"Cron-jobs is a non-profit organization supporting Cron, a Unix-software utility. The site was spoofed! Cron-jobs documents what happened here: cron-job.org/en/spam- statement... The messages are not from them, thus they cannot stop them. They don’t even use the “contact@cron-job.org” email... The messages are likely being sent on a bot-network. These are computers that have malware on them and their owners don’t know the machines were hijacked..."

So, a word to the wise. Regularly scan you computer (e.g., laptop, desktop, tablet, phone) to identify and remove malware. You don't want to contribute to the e-mail spam problem.

I noticed another sender's e-mail address generating lots of spam: XXXXXXXXXXXXaolea.us. The spammers vary the numbers and letters in the XXX portion of the e-mail address, but my e-mail service provider is skilled at identifying bogus messages.

Last, if you haven't activated the spam filter offered by your e-mail provider, now is a good time to do so.


Despite Disavowals, Leading Tech Companies Help Extremist Sites Monetize Hate

[Editor's note: today's guest post, by reporters at ProPublica, explores how hate sites maintain an online presence. It is reprinted with permission.]

By Julia Angwin, Jeff Larson, Madeleine Varner and Lauren Kirchner. ProPublica

Because of its "extreme hostility toward Muslims," the website Jihadwatch.org is considered an active hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League. The views of the site's director, Robert Spencer, on Islam led the British Home Office to ban him from entering the country in 2013.

But its designation as a hate site hasn't stopped tech companies -- including PayPal, Amazon and Newsmax -- from maintaining partnerships with Jihad Watch that help to sustain it financially. PayPal facilitates donations to the site. Newsmax -- the online news network run by President Donald Trump's close friend Chris Ruddy -- pays Jihad Watch in return for users clicking on its headlines. Until recently, Amazon allowed Jihad Watch to participate in a program that promised a cut of any book sales that the site generated. All three companies have policies that say they don't do business with hate groups.

Jihad Watch is one of many sites that monetize their extremist views through relationships with technology companies. ProPublica surveyed the most visited websites of groups designated as extremist by either the SPLC or the Anti-Defamation League. We found that more than half of them -- 39 out of 69 -- made money from ads, donations or other revenue streams facilitated by technology companies. At least 10 tech companies played a role directly or indirectly in supporting these sites.

Traditionally, tech companies have justified such relationships by contending that it's not their role to censor the Internet or to discourage legitimate political expression. Also, their management wasn't necessarily aware that they were doing business with hate sites because tech services tend to be automated and based on algorithms tied to demographics.

In the wake of last week's violent protest by alt-right groups in Charlottesville, more tech companies have disavowed relationships with extremist groups. During just the last week, six of the sites on our list were shut down. Even the web services company Cloudflare, which had long defended its laissez-faire approach to political expression, finally ended its relationship with the neo-Nazi site The Daily Stormer last week.

"I can't recall a time where the tech industry was so in step in their response to hate on their platforms," said Oren Segal, director of the ADL's Center on Extremism. "Stopping financial support to hate sites seems like a win-win for everyone."

But ProPublica's findings indicate that some tech companies with anti-hate policies may have failed to establish the monitoring processes needed to weed out hate sites. PayPal, the payment processor, has a policy against working with sites that use its service for "the promotion of hate, violence, [or] racial intolerance." Yet it was by far the top tech provider to the hate sites with donation links on 23 sites, or about one-third of those surveyed by ProPublica. In response to ProPublica's inquiries, PayPal spokesman Justin Higgs said in a statement that the company "strives to conscientiously assess activity and review accounts reported to us."

After Charlottesville, PayPal stopped accepting payments or donations for several high-profile white nationalist groups that participated in the march. It posted a statement that it would remain "vigilant on hate, violence & intolerance." It addresses each case individually, and "strives to navigate the balance between freedom of expression" and the "limiting and closing" of hate sites, it said.

After being contacted by ProPublica, Newsmax said it was unaware that the three sites that it had relationships with were considered hateful. "We will review the content of these sites and make any necessary changes after that review," said Andy Brown, chief operating officer of Newsmax.

Amazon spokeswoman Angie Newman said the company had previously removed Jihad Watch and three other sites identified by ProPublica from its program sharing revenue for book sales, which is called Amazon Associates. When ProPublica pointed out that the sites still carried working links to the program, she said that it was their responsibility to remove the code. "They are no longer paid as an Associate regardless of what links are on their site once we remove them from the Associates Program," she said.

Where to set the boundaries between hate speech and legitimate advocacy for perspectives on the edge of the political spectrum, and who should set them, are complex and difficult questions. Like other media outlets, we relied in part on the Southern Poverty Law Center's public list of "Active Hate Groups 2016." This list is controversial in some circles, with critics questioning whether the SPLC is too quick to brand organizations on the right as hate groups.

Still, the center does provide detailed explanations for many of its designations. For instance, the SPLC documents its decision to include the Family Research Council by citing the evangelical lobbying group's promotion of discredited science and unsubstantiated attacks on gay and lesbian people. We also consulted a list from ADL, which is not public and that was provided to us for research purposes. See our methodology here.

The sites that we identified from the ADL and SPLC lists vehemently denied that they are hate sites.

"It is not hateful, racist or extremist to oppose jihad terror," said Spencer, the director of Jihad Watch. He added that the true extremism was displayed by groups that seek to censor the Internet and that by asking questions about the tech platforms on his site, we were "aiding and abetting a quintessentially fascist enterprise."

Spencer made these comments in response to questions emailed by ProPublica reporter Lauren Kirchner. Afterwards, Spencer posted an item on Jihad Watch alleging that "leftist 'journalist'" Kirchner had threatened the site. He also posted Kirchner's photo and email, as well as his correspondence with her. After being contacted by ProPublica, another anti-Islam activist, Pamela Geller, also posted an attack on Kirchner, calling her a "senior reporting troll." Like Spencer, Geller was banned by the British Home Office; her eponymous site is on the SPLC and ADL lists.

Donations -- and the ability to accept them online through PayPal and similar companies -- are a lifeline for sites like Jihad Watch. In 2015, the nonprofit website disclosed that three quarters of its roughly $100,000 in revenues came from donations, according to publicly available tax records.

In recent weeks, PayPal has been working to shut down donations to extremist sites. This week, it pulled the plug on VDARE.com, an anti-immigration website designated as "white nationalist" by the SPLC and as a hate site by the ADL. VDARE, which denies being white nationalist, immediately switched to its backup system, Stripe.

Stripe, a private company recently described by Bloomberg Businessweek as a $9 billion startup, is unusual in not having a policy against working with hate sites. It does, however, prohibit financial transactions that support drugs, pornography and "psychic services." Stripe provided donation links for 10 sites, second only to PayPal on our list. Stripe did not respond to a request for comment.

VDARE editor Peter Brimelow declared on his site that the PayPal shutdown was likely part of a purge by the "authoritarian Communist Left to punish anyone who disagrees with their anti-American violence against patriotic people." He urged his readers to donate through other channels such as Bitcoins. "We need your help desperately," he wrote. "We must have the resources to defend ourselves and our people."

In 2015, VDARE received nearly all of its revenue -- $267,038 out of total $293,663 -- from donations, according to publicly available tax return forms that the Internal Revenue Service requires nonprofits to disclose.

Brimelow did not respond to our questions, instead characterizing ProPublica as the "Totalitarian Left."

Some sites also supplement their donations with revenue from online advertising. For instance, SonsofLibertyMedia.com, which is on the SPLC list, generated about 10 percent of its revenue -- $37,828 -- from advertising in 2015, according to its tax documents.

The site, which describes itself as promoting a "Judeo-Christian ethic," and recently posted an article declaring that a black activist protesting Confederate statues needed "a serious beat down," does not appear to attract advertisers directly.

Instead, Sons of Liberty benefits from a type of ad-piggybacking arrangement that is becoming more common in the tech industry. The website runs sponsored news articles from a company called Taboola, which shares ad revenues with it. Known for being at the forefront of "click-bait," Taboola places links on websites to articles about celebrities and popular culture.

Taboola's policy prohibits working with sites that have "politically religious agendas" or use hate speech. "We strive to ensure the safety of our network but from time to time, unfortunately, mistakes can happen," said Taboola spokeswoman Dana Miller. "We will ask our Content Policy group to review this site again and take action if needed."

Sons of Liberty founder Bradlee Dean said that he forwarded our questions to his attorney. The lawyer did not respond.

Hate sites can initiate relationships with tech companies with little scrutiny.

Any website can fill out an online form asking to join, for instance, Amazon's network, and often can get approved instantly. Once a website has joined a tech network, it can quickly start earning money through advertising, donations, or content farms such as Taboola that share ad revenues with websites that distribute their articles.

Some companies, such as Newsmax, say that joining their ad network requires explicit prior approval.

But, according to a former Newsmax employee, the only criterion for this approval was whether traffic to the site reached a minimum threshold. There was no content review. Salespeople were told to be aggressive in signing up publishing partners.

"We'd put our news feed on anybody's page, anyone who was willing to listen," he said, "it's about email addresses, it's about marketing, they don't care about ultra conservative or left wing."

Dylan Roof frequented a website described by the SPLC as "white nationalist." He said in a manifesto posted online that finding the website was a turning point in his life. He went on to murder nine African-American churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015. That year, USA Today found Newsmax ads on the site.

They no longer appear there.

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The Bogus Claims By Broadband Providers And Their Allies About Net Neutrality

The Techdirt blog has called out -- in plain language -- the bogus claims and distortions by broadband providers about net neutrality rules. Techdirt reported:

"... one of AT&T, Comcast and Verizon's favorite bogus claims about net neutrality rules is that such consumer protections will somehow prevent the sick or disabled from getting the essential internet connectivity they need. For example, Verizon once tried to claim that the deaf and disabled would be harmed if large ISPs weren't allowed to create fast or slow lanes.. this claim that net neutrality rules somehow prevent ISPs from prioritizing essential medical technologies or other priority traffic has always been bullshit. The FCC's 2015 open internet rules (pdf) are embedded with numerous, significant caveats when it comes to creating fast and slow lanes... In fact, the existing rules go to great lengths to differentiate "Broadband Internet Access Service (BIAS),” (your e-mail, Netflix streams and other more ordinary traffic) from “Non-BIAS data services,” which can include everything from priority VoIP traffic to your heart monitor and other Telemedicine systems."

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), led by Ajit Pai a former lawyer at Verizon, moved closer to eliminating net neutrality with a preliminary vote in May. For those who don't know or have forgotten, net neutrality is when consumers are in control -- consumers choose where to go online with the broadband they've purchased, and ISPs must treat all content equally. That means no blocking, no throttling, and no paid prioritization. Net neutrality means consumers stay in control of where they go online.

Without net neutrality, consumers lose the freedom of choice. ISPs will decide where consumers can go online, which sites you can visit, and which sites you can visit only if you pay more. ISPs will likely group web sites into tiers (e.g., slow vs. fast "lanes"), similar to premium cable-TV channels. Do you want your monthly internet bill as confusing, complicated, and expensive as your cable-TV bill? I don't, and I doubt you do either.

TechDirt highlighted other bogus claims:

... how net neutrality kills network investment) doesn't stop it from being circulated repeatedly by the army of politicians, think tankers, consultants, fauxcademics, and lobbyists paid to pee in the net neutrality discourse pool.

One of the core perpetrators of this myth is AT&T, which just scored a massive, lucrative $6.5 billion contract to build the nation's first, unified emergency first responder network: aka FirstNet... AT&T isn't worried about net neutrality rules harming medical services, since they've long-been exempted. AT&T's worried about one thing: any rules stopping it from abusing a lack of broadband competition to drive up prices and engage in anti-competitive behavior."

Back in May, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) tmoved closer to eliminating net neutrality with a preliminary vote in May.

What can you do? Plenty. Now is the time for more concerned citizens to rise, speak up, and fight back. Write to your elected officials. Tell your friends, classmates, coworkers, and family members. Use this action form to contact your elected officials. Participate in local marches and protests. Join the Fight For The Future. Support the EFF.


Data Breach Exposes Information Of Millions Of Verizon Customers

Verizon logo A data breach at Verizon has exposed the sensitive information of millions of customers. ZD Net reported:

"As many as 14 million records of subscribers who called the phone giant's customer services in the past six months were found on an unprotected Amazon S3 storage server controlled by an employee of NICE Systems, a Ra'anana, Israel-based company. The data was downloadable by anyone with the easy-to-guess web address."

Many businesses use cloud services vendors  -- Amazon Web Services and other vendors -- to outsource the storage of customers' information in online databases. While the practice isn't new, a problem is that customers aren't always informed of the business practice using their sensitive information.

Founded in 1986, NICE Systems has 3,500 employees, serves about 25,000 customers in 150 countries, and provides services to 85 percent of Fortune 100 companies. The exact number of affected Verizon customers is disputed.

The security firm Upguard found the unprotected cloud-based storage server:

"Upguard's Cyber Risk Team can now report that a mis-configured cloud-based file repository exposed the names, addresses, account details, and account personal identification numbers (PINs) of as many as 14 million US customers of telecommunications carrier Verizon, per analysis of the average number of accounts exposed per day in the sample that was downloaded. The cloud server was owned and operated by telephonic software and data firm NICE Systems, a third-party vendor for Verizon. (UPDATE: July 12, 3 PM PST - Both NICE Systems and Verizon have since confirmed the veracity of the exposure, while a Verizon spokesperson has claimed that only 6 million customers had data exposed)."

Whether the total number of breach victims is 6 or 14 million customers, neither is good. The phrase "account details" is troubling. That could mean anything from e-mail addresses to payment information to residential addresses, or more.

Upguard's announcement added:

"Beyond the risks of exposed names, addresses, and account information being made accessible via the S3 bucket’s URL, the exposure of Verizon account PIN codes used to verify customers, listed alongside their associated phone numbers, is particularly concerning. Possession of these account PIN codes could allow scammers to successfully pose as customers in calls to Verizon, enabling them to gain access to accounts—an especially threatening prospect, given the increasing reliance upon mobile communications for purposes of two-factor authentication.

Finally, this exposure is a potent example of the risks of third-party vendors handling sensitive data... Third-party vendor risk is business risk; sharing access to sensitive business data does not offload this risk, but merely extends it to the contracted partner, enabling cloud leaks to stretch across several continents and involve multiple enterprises."

Agreed. This outsourcing business practice may be profitable for all companies involved, but the outsourcing practice does not decrease the risks. Not good. Mis-configured cloud servers should not happen. Not good. The event raises the question: when has this happened before, but went undetected?

Verizon released a statement about the incident:

"... an employee of one of our vendors put information into a cloud storage area and incorrectly set the storage to allow external access. We have been able to confirm that the only access to the cloud storage area by a person other than Verizon or its vendor was a researcher who brought this issue to our attention. In other words, there has been no loss or theft of Verizon or Verizon customer information.

By way of background, the vendor was supporting an approved initiative to help us improve a residential and small business wireline self-service call center portal and required certain data for the project. The overwhelming majority of information in the data set had no external value, although there was a limited amount of personal information included, and in particular, there were no Social Security numbers or Verizon voice recordings in the cloud storage area.

To further clarify, the data supports a wireline portal and only includes a limited number of cell phone numbers for customer contact purposes. In addition, to the extent PINs were included in the data set, the PINs are used to authenticate a customer calling our wireline call center, but do not provide online access to customer accounts..."

Typically, after a breach companies hire independent security experts to investigate breaches and the contributing causes. Verizon's announcement did not state who, if anyone, it hired to perform a post-breach investigation nor when. So, according to Verizon: no big deal. No problem. Hmmmmm.

Reportedly, Upguard notified Verizon about the breach on June 13, and the breach was fixed on June 22. Upguard added:

"The long duration of time between the initial June 13th notification to Verizon by UpGuard of this data exposure, and the ultimate closure of the breach on June 22nd, is troubling."

Troubling, indeed. What took Verizon (and/or Nice Systems) so long? Verizon's statement didn't say. And what is Verizon (and/or NICE Systems) doing so this type of breach doesn't happen again? I look forward to upcoming explanations by both companies.

Readers: what are your opinions of this data breach? Of how long it took Verizon to fix things? Of the outsourcing practice? Verizon customers:

  • Is Verizon doing enough to protect your sensitive data?
  • Should affected customers be notified directly?
  • Have you received a breach notice from Verizon? If so, share some of its details.

Verizon To Exit Its Copper Wire Telephone Business In Several States In 2018

Verizon logo If your home uses a copper wire telephone service, often called a "landline" or POTS (e.g., Plain Old Telephone Service), you may soon have to make a change. In Boston, Verizon will abandon its landline business in June 2018.

On Saturday, my wife received a letter via postal mail from Verizon. We live in Boston. The "Notice of Copper Retirement" stated:

"Currently, Verizon brings voice and/or data services to your home over copper cables. However, the company is updating to fiber-optic technology in your area, and will be retiring its copper facilities that currently serve you and your neighbors.

To continue to provide you service, Verizon will have to move your service to these fiber-optic facilities. If fiber is available to your home now, we will be contacting you individually soon to schedule an appointment to transition your services to fiber. Otherwise, we will be contacting you once fiber is available. In either case, we will need to move your service well before we retire the copper in your area which is scheduled for on or after June 1, 2018

We will transfer your voice services from copper to fiber at no cost to you. This transfer will not result in any change to the voice service that you currently receive from Verizon. You may continue to subscribe to the same voice service at the same price, terms, and conditions. In addition, any devices that rely upon your voice service, such as fax machines, medical devices, or security alarms connected to a central station, will continue to work in the same way as they currently do over copper. We will also provide you with a battery backup device at no charge. For almost all residential customers, that device uses standard D-cell batteries that can support up to 24 hours of standby voice service during a commercial power outage. In case of a prolonged power outage, you can simply replace the batteries and extend the backup power.

If you subscribe to our High Speed Internet service, the migration to fiber will require a change since that service is not available on our fiber facilities. The Internet access service that we offer on fiber is FiOS Internet. FiOS Internet is available at significantly faster speeds than High Speed Internet. We will offer the service at a special rate for customers who migrate from copper to fiber facilities as a result of the retirement of our copper facilities. In some cases, this price may be lower or higher than what you currently pay for internet access.

Please review the Frequently Asked Questions for additional information about the fiber update or visit us at verizon.com/fiberupgrade. If you still have questions, please call us Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., or Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.n. at 1-877-439-7442.

You may also contact the Federal Communications Commission or your State Commission if you have any questions. Thank you for continuing to be a loyal customer. We greatly appreciate your business.

Sincerely

Janet Gazlay Martin
Director, Network Transformation

I visited the website mentioned in the notice. That site pitches the FiOS Internet service, and doesn't explain the company's copper landline retirement activities. You have to do a little digging online to find the locations where Verizon announced its retirement of copper-wire telephone services. The locations include several states in the Northeast and Middle Atlantic regions. Earlier this month, Verizon announced the retirement of copper landlines next year in the following states, cities, and towns:

  • Delaware: Newark, Ocean View
  • Maryland: Bethesda, Columbia, Glen Burnie, Rockville, Towson
  • Massachusetts: Danvers, Dorchester, Framingham, Hanover, Lawrence, Leominster, Marblehead, Newton, North Chelmsford, Roxbury, Stoughton, West Roxbury
  • New Jersey: Bergen, Berlin, Cape May, Cranford, East Dover, East Orange, Ewing, Freehold, Hackensack, Haddonfield, Journal Square, Marlton, Medford, Merchantville, Morristown, New Brunswick, Red Bank, Somerville, Toms River, Union City, Wall Township, Woodbury
  • New York: Cayuga Williamsville, Cornwall, Mineola, Mount Vernon, Plainview Central, Skaneateles, White Plains, and multiple areas within all of the five boroughs of New York City
  • Pennsylvania: Allentown, Dormont, Glenolden, Jefferson, Jenkintown, Mayfair, Mechanicsburg, portions of Philadelphia, Pilgrim, Turtle Creek, Wilkinsburg
  • Rhode Island: portions of Providence
  • Virginia: Arlington, Falls Church, Reston, Springfield, Virginia Beach, and portions of Richmond

The telecommunications company made similar announcements during February, 2017 about other areas within the same states. Verizon is not alone. Telephone companies have planned for years to abandon their their copper landline services. In August 2015, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) reported that the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC):

"... set new ground rules for carriers seeking to replace their old copper telephone networks. Approved by a 3-2 vote at an open meeting yesterday, the rules require carriers to notify customers in advance and to seek FCC approval before reducing services... FCC chairman Tom Wheeler and others have been pushing to shift telephone traffic to fiber optics and the Internet. Critics have charged that phone companies are allowing their old copper networks to decay to force customers to shift to fiber service. But some 37 million households —- many of them headed by elderly people —- remain on legacy copper, commissioner Mignon Clyburn noted at the hearing. Other holdouts live in rural areas that lack cellular and broadband service. Some prefer copper connections because they are independent of local power lines, and offer better 911 emergency service.

The FCC ruling requires that carriers notify retail customers at least three months before shutting down a copper network, and provide six-months notice to interconnecting carriers using the old lines. (Clyburn complained that that's much less time than the FCC gave before shutting down analog broadcast television, but voted for the measure anyway.) Carriers also must seek FCC approval if the telephone changeover would "discontinue, reduce or impair" service... In a separate vote, all five FCC commissioners agreed to require carriers to offer customers backup power supplies that maintain their phone service during prolonged power outages..."

You can read announcements by AT&T about copper landline retirements. CenturyLink notified the FCC last year about copper landline retirements in eight states: in Alabama, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Since the FCC set copper-retirement rules in 2015, technology adoption has climbed slightly. In January of this year, Pew Research reported that 77 percent of adults in the USA own a smartphone and 73 percent have broadband internet at home. However, while:

"... broadband adoption has increased to its highest level since the Center began tracking this topic in early 2000, not all Americans have shared in these gains. For instance, those who have not graduated from high school are nearly three times less likely than college graduates to have home broadband service (34 percent vs. 91 percent)... 12 percent of Americans say they are “smartphone dependent” when it comes to their online access – meaning they own a smartphone but lack traditional broadband service at home. The share of Americans who are smartphone dependent has increased 4 percentage points since 2013, and smartphone reliance is especially pronounced among young adults, nonwhites and those with relatively low household incomes."

While more people have smartphones and internet access at home, a sizeable number still have copper landlines. Phys.org reported in November 2016 the results of a recent survey:

"... 20 percent of the nation's households still view having a landline or fixed telephone as the most important of their telecommunications choices, according to a survey that queried consumers about their telephone and internet preferences... The study also found that for the average consumer, having mobile telephone service is about 3.5 times more important than a landline or fixed telephone service... Study findings suggest about 90 percent of American households have at least one mobile phone, 75 percent have fixed internet service, 58 percent have mobile internet service and 49 percent have fixed telephone service. Mobile telephone service was the most important service for the typical respondent, followed by fixed internet service, mobile internet service and fixed telephone service, although a portion rank fixed telephone first."

According to the 2012 United States Census, there are about 117 million households in the United States, and 2.59 persons on average per household. So, a substantial portion of the population will probably view negatively the termination of copper wire telephone services in their homes.

Verizon's copper termination notice was unnecessarily complicated, which could confuse many consumers. The portion of its notice which said "If fiber is available to your home..." was laughable. FiOS is already available in our neighborhood. Verizon notified me months ago, and I already migrated my antiquated DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) internet service on my phone line to FiOS. Verizon's landline business unit should know what its FiOS division is doing.The left hand should know what the right hand is doing.

So, Verizon's notice wasn't as customized nor as relevant as it could have been. It makes one wonder if, in its zeal to terminate its copper wire phone business, Verizon rushed the customer letters.

Readers of this blog remember the Boston City Council's hearings in 2015 about residents' requests for FiOS. In 2015, Verizon hadn't deployed FiOS even though it had been available in several suburban towns for many years. Example: a friend in Lexington has had FiOS since at least 2009. So, Verizon could have deployed FiOS far sooner, providing consumers more time to migrate their phone service without rushing.

What should consumers do? It depends upon your lifestyle. If you already have a smartphone, you may want to simply terminate your landline phone service and use your smartphone instead. If you don't have a smartphone, you can migrate your copper landline phone service to Verizon's FiOS fiber connection, to a smartphone, or to another telephone service provider. For example, many cable-TV providers, such as Comcast, provide phone service in residences.

Some consumers value security and privacy. If you perform phone-based banking or online banking with your desktop/laptop computer, then security is a concern. Since smartphones or wireless phones using home WiFi networks transmit using radio waves, you'll probably want to encrypt you wireless online banking transmissions to protect against theft by criminals or hackers. Several brands of Virtual Private Network (VPN) software and apps are available to encrypt your wireless transmissions. If you are unfamiliar with VPN software, this prior blog post contains links to online primers and tutorials.

If you received a copper termination letter from your phone company, what were your opinions of it? Did you switch to fiber landlines or to wireless?