244 posts categorized "Retail" Feed

Verizon To Exit Its Copper Wire Telephone Business In Several States In 2018

Verizon logo If your home uses a copper wire telephone service, often called a "landline" or POTS (e.g., Plain Old Telephone Service), you may soon have to make a change. In Boston, Verizon will abandon its landline business in June 2018.

On Saturday, my wife received a letter via postal mail from Verizon. We live in Boston. The "Notice of Copper Retirement" stated:

"Currently, Verizon brings voice and/or data services to your home over copper cables. However, the company is updating to fiber-optic technology in your area, and will be retiring its copper facilities that currently serve you and your neighbors.

To continue to provide you service, Verizon will have to move your service to these fiber-optic facilities. If fiber is available to your home now, we will be contacting you individually soon to schedule an appointment to transition your services to fiber. Otherwise, we will be contacting you once fiber is available. In either case, we will need to move your service well before we retire the copper in your area which is scheduled for on or after June 1, 2018

We will transfer your voice services from copper to fiber at no cost to you. This transfer will not result in any change to the voice service that you currently receive from Verizon. You may continue to subscribe to the same voice service at the same price, terms, and conditions. In addition, any devices that rely upon your voice service, such as fax machines, medical devices, or security alarms connected to a central station, will continue to work in the same way as they currently do over copper. We will also provide you with a battery backup device at no charge. For almost all residential customers, that device uses standard D-cell batteries that can support up to 24 hours of standby voice service during a commercial power outage. In case of a prolonged power outage, you can simply replace the batteries and extend the backup power.

If you subscribe to our High Speed Internet service, the migration to fiber will require a change since that service is not available on our fiber facilities. The Internet access service that we offer on fiber is FiOS Internet. FiOS Internet is available at significantly faster speeds than High Speed Internet. We will offer the service at a special rate for customers who migrate from copper to fiber facilities as a result of the retirement of our copper facilities. In some cases, this price may be lower or higher than what you currently pay for internet access.

Please review the Frequently Asked Questions for additional information about the fiber update or visit us at verizon.com/fiberupgrade. If you still have questions, please call us Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., or Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.n. at 1-877-439-7442.

You may also contact the Federal Communications Commission or your State Commission if you have any questions. Thank you for continuing to be a loyal customer. We greatly appreciate your business.

Sincerely

Janet Gazlay Martin
Director, Network Transformation

I visited the website mentioned in the notice. That site pitches the FiOS Internet service, and doesn't explain the company's copper landline retirement activities. You have to do a little digging online to find the locations where Verizon announced its retirement of copper-wire telephone services. The locations include several states in the Northeast and Middle Atlantic regions. Earlier this month, Verizon announced the retirement of copper landlines next year in the following states, cities, and towns:

  • Delaware: Newark, Ocean View
  • Maryland: Bethesda, Columbia, Glen Burnie, Rockville, Towson
  • Massachusetts: Danvers, Dorchester, Framingham, Hanover, Lawrence, Leominster, Marblehead, Newton, North Chelmsford, Roxbury, Stoughton, West Roxbury
  • New Jersey: Bergen, Berlin, Cape May, Cranford, East Dover, East Orange, Ewing, Freehold, Hackensack, Haddonfield, Journal Square, Marlton, Medford, Merchantville, Morristown, New Brunswick, Red Bank, Somerville, Toms River, Union City, Wall Township, Woodbury
  • New York: Cayuga Williamsville, Cornwall, Mineola, Mount Vernon, Plainview Central, Skaneateles, White Plains, and multiple areas within all of the five boroughs of New York City
  • Pennsylvania: Allentown, Dormont, Glenolden, Jefferson, Jenkintown, Mayfair, Mechanicsburg, portions of Philadelphia, Pilgrim, Turtle Creek, Wilkinsburg
  • Rhode Island: portions of Providence
  • Virginia: Arlington, Falls Church, Reston, Springfield, Virginia Beach, and portions of Richmond

The telecommunications company made similar announcements during February, 2017 about other areas within the same states. Verizon is not alone. Telephone companies have planned for years to abandon their their copper landline services. In August 2015, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) reported that the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC):

"... set new ground rules for carriers seeking to replace their old copper telephone networks. Approved by a 3-2 vote at an open meeting yesterday, the rules require carriers to notify customers in advance and to seek FCC approval before reducing services... FCC chairman Tom Wheeler and others have been pushing to shift telephone traffic to fiber optics and the Internet. Critics have charged that phone companies are allowing their old copper networks to decay to force customers to shift to fiber service. But some 37 million households —- many of them headed by elderly people —- remain on legacy copper, commissioner Mignon Clyburn noted at the hearing. Other holdouts live in rural areas that lack cellular and broadband service. Some prefer copper connections because they are independent of local power lines, and offer better 911 emergency service.

The FCC ruling requires that carriers notify retail customers at least three months before shutting down a copper network, and provide six-months notice to interconnecting carriers using the old lines. (Clyburn complained that that's much less time than the FCC gave before shutting down analog broadcast television, but voted for the measure anyway.) Carriers also must seek FCC approval if the telephone changeover would "discontinue, reduce or impair" service... In a separate vote, all five FCC commissioners agreed to require carriers to offer customers backup power supplies that maintain their phone service during prolonged power outages..."

You can read announcements by AT&T about copper landline retirements. CenturyLink notified the FCC last year about copper landline retirements in eight states: in Alabama, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Since the FCC set copper-retirement rules in 2015, technology adoption has climbed slightly. In January of this year, Pew Research reported that 77 percent of adults in the USA own a smartphone and 73 percent have broadband internet at home. However, while:

"... broadband adoption has increased to its highest level since the Center began tracking this topic in early 2000, not all Americans have shared in these gains. For instance, those who have not graduated from high school are nearly three times less likely than college graduates to have home broadband service (34 percent vs. 91 percent)... 12 percent of Americans say they are “smartphone dependent” when it comes to their online access – meaning they own a smartphone but lack traditional broadband service at home. The share of Americans who are smartphone dependent has increased 4 percentage points since 2013, and smartphone reliance is especially pronounced among young adults, nonwhites and those with relatively low household incomes."

While more people have smartphones and internet access at home, a sizeable number still have copper landlines. Phys.org reported in November 2016 the results of a recent survey:

"... 20 percent of the nation's households still view having a landline or fixed telephone as the most important of their telecommunications choices, according to a survey that queried consumers about their telephone and internet preferences... The study also found that for the average consumer, having mobile telephone service is about 3.5 times more important than a landline or fixed telephone service... Study findings suggest about 90 percent of American households have at least one mobile phone, 75 percent have fixed internet service, 58 percent have mobile internet service and 49 percent have fixed telephone service. Mobile telephone service was the most important service for the typical respondent, followed by fixed internet service, mobile internet service and fixed telephone service, although a portion rank fixed telephone first."

According to the 2012 United States Census, there are about 117 million households in the United States, and 2.59 persons on average per household. So, a substantial portion of the population will probably view negatively the termination of copper wire telephone services in their homes.

Verizon's copper termination notice was unnecessarily complicated, which could confuse many consumers. The portion of its notice which said "If fiber is available to your home..." was laughable. FiOS is already available in our neighborhood. Verizon notified me months ago, and I already migrated my antiquated DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) internet service on my phone line to FiOS. Verizon's landline business unit should know what its FiOS division is doing.The left hand should know what the right hand is doing.

So, Verizon's notice wasn't as customized nor as relevant as it could have been. It makes one wonder if, in its zeal to terminate its copper wire phone business, Verizon rushed the customer letters.

Readers of this blog remember the Boston City Council's hearings in 2015 about residents' requests for FiOS. In 2015, Verizon hadn't deployed FiOS even though it had been available in several suburban towns for many years. Example: a friend in Lexington has had FiOS since at least 2009. So, Verizon could have deployed FiOS far sooner, providing consumers more time to migrate their phone service without rushing.

What should consumers do? It depends upon your lifestyle. If you already have a smartphone, you may want to simply terminate your landline phone service and use your smartphone instead. If you don't have a smartphone, you can migrate your copper landline phone service to Verizon's FiOS fiber connection, to a smartphone, or to another telephone service provider. For example, many cable-TV providers, such as Comcast, provide phone service in residences.

Some consumers value security and privacy. If you perform phone-based banking or online banking with your desktop/laptop computer, then security is a concern. Since smartphones or wireless phones using home WiFi networks transmit using radio waves, you'll probably want to encrypt you wireless online banking transmissions to protect against theft by criminals or hackers. Several brands of Virtual Private Network (VPN) software and apps are available to encrypt your wireless transmissions. If you are unfamiliar with VPN software, this prior blog post contains links to online primers and tutorials.

If you received a copper termination letter from your phone company, what were your opinions of it? Did you switch to fiber landlines or to wireless?


Coming Soon: A New HD Video Standard For TV. Will Over-The-Air Broadcasts Remain Free?

Federal communications Commission logo Soon, consumers will hear about improvements in over-the-air broadcast television. Free, broadcast television has been around since forever, and High Definition (HD) broadcast signals have been around since 2009. Many consumers have chosen free, over-the-air broadcast television to avoid expensive monthly cable-TV bills.

Consumer Reports explained:

"Technically called ATSC 3.0, the new broadcast standard is—thankfully—being more generally billed as "Next-Gen Broadcast TV." There are a few big differences between our current ATSC 1.0 broadcasts and the new ones we'll receive as part of ATSC 3.0. A key one is that the new standard is IP (internet protocol)-based, which means it can carry internet content alongside traditional TV broadcasts. The broadcasts can also include 4K video and high dynamic range (HDR) content—the two biggest selling points in TVs right now."

And, consumers will be able to receive the new HD broadcast signals on their smart phones. Reportedly, the coming ATSC 3.0 standard will use a more efficient video format, called HEVC or H.265, which streaming services already use.

Last year, WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina began to broadcast using the new standard with a documentary, "Take Me Out To the Bulls' Game." The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced in February a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) which sought comments from the public about the new HD broadcast standard. That FCC announcement stated, in part:

"ATSC 3.0 has the potential to greatly improve broadcast signal reception on mobile devices and television receivers without outdoor antennas.  It is also intended to enable broadcasters to offer enhanced and innovative new features to consumers, including Ultra High Definition picture and immersive audio, more localized programming content, an advanced emergency alert system capable of waking up sleeping devices to warn consumers of imminent emergencies, improved accessibility options, and interactive services.

A coalition of broadcast and consumer electronics industry representatives petitioned the Commission to allow the use of the new standard. The upgraded technology is intended to merge the capabilities of over-the-air broadcasting with the broadband viewing and information delivery methods of the Internet using the same 6 MHz channels presently allocated for digital television (DTV)."

Like most things in life, details matter. Consumer Reports warned:

"... Jonathan Schwantes, senior policy counsel at Consumers Union, the policy and mobilization arm of Consumer Reports, says that some consumers could lose the ability to get some ATSC 1.0 signals if the host station is located farther away than their current broadcaster.

"Our position is that next-gen TV can and will be beneficial to consumers if implemented by the FCC in a measured and conscientious manner," he says. That could include making sure the current coverage areas are preserved as much as possible, not allowing broadcasters to downgrade the quality of ATSC 1.0 broadcasts from high to standard definition, and providing consumers with education on issues such as the timing of the transition and what new equipment they may need."

So, some broadcasters might choose to cut corners while migrating to the new standard: reduce their existing HD over-the-air signal strength, degrade their existing HD signal quality, or both. Not good.

And, there's more bad news for consumers. The new HD broadcast standard may cost more. You're probably wondering how, since over-the-air broadcasts have been free since television was introduced. Consumer Reports explained:

"... broadcasters could encrypt at least part of their programming, and require users to create an account and pay for access to certain features. No details are available on how this would work from the consumer's point of view. Consumers Union and other groups say they will insist that consumers continue to have access to free over-the air high-definition TV reception."

The new HD broadcast standard should not include hidden costs or new fees for consumers. For many consumers, new televisions are expensive and out of reach. Many consumers have chosen to "cut the cord" to save money. For these consumers, free over-the-air broadcast television is vital.

Nor should broadcasters be able to cut corners and force consumers to the new HD standard by degrading their existing HD signal strength and/or quality. The new HD broadcast standard should be voluntary for consumers. Nor should consumers be forced to submit to broadcasters their personal, contact, and payment information. One of the benefits of over-the-air broadcasts is privacy.

The next-gen TV standard offers benefits to both consumers and broadcasters. The FCC must balance the needs of both, and not serve only one group. The industry uses the term "Multi-channel Video Programming Distributors" (MVPD) to describe companies that provide video content. These MVPD companies include video producers and distributors: legacy cable-TV providers, TV networks, and others that provide programming via cable, the Internet, and over-the-air broadcasts.

Some MVPDs do both: produce and distribute video content. These MVPDs have a financial bias to force consumers from free over-the-air broadcasts to their proprietary, higher cost distribution networks (e.g., cable, internet). Consumers must have the freedom to choose how they consumer video content, and not have a distribution network forced upon them via bundling, "retransmission consent system," or other MVPD tactics.

What are retransmission consent systems? This 16-142 filing by Consumer's Union, Public Knowledge, and New America's Open Technology Institute explained (Adobe PDF):

"It is increasingly axiomatic that, when MVPDs and broadcast groups engage in retransmission consent negotiations, consumers end up suffering, or footing the bill, or both. Increased broadcast retransmission consent fees are passed on to consumers by MVPDs who have little choice but to accept most broadcaster demands or face crippling blackouts.... Large MVPDs, and those which also own broadcast interests, also use the retransmission consent process to extract favorable terms, potentially limiting the growth or viability of competitive video services. Comcast, for example, is rumored to have fleshed out its fledgling over-the-top (OTT) service by exercising most-favored-nation clauses in many of its carriage contracts. Comcast can only demand such favorable contract terms due to its dominant position in the video delivery marketplace, and once again, consumers are left holding the bag..."

So, the FCC must not make things worse for consumers by allowing the new HD broadcast standard to reduce competition and raise prices. Higher prices may be good for MVPDs (and their stockholders) but not for consumers.

If you want to submit a comment or read comments already submitted about the new HD broadcast standard, search for the 16-142 Filing within the FCC's Electronic Filing & Comment System (ECFS). At press time, only 167 persons, companies, and entities had submitted filings and comments (compared to 2,869,632 comments via ECFS about Net Neutrality). Not good.

What are your opinions about the new HD video broadcast standard?


Attorneys General In Several States Announce Settlement Agreements With Target

Target Bullseye logo The Office of the Attorney General (AG) for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts announced on Wednesday that the state will receive $625,000 as part of the settlement agreement with Target Corporation. The settlement agreement, which includes 47 states plus the District of Colombia, resolves claims by states about the retailer's massive data breach in 2013.

Card issuers had also sued the retailer. Target settled with Visa in August, 2015 to resolve claims in which 110 million consumers' records were stolen, including 40 million credit- and debit-card numbers. Also, debit card PIN numbers were stolen.

The announcement by Massachusetts AG Maura Healey explained:

"The investigation found that the stolen credentials were used to exploit weaknesses in Target’s system, which allowed the attackers to access a customer service database, install malware on the system and then capture data from credit or debit card transactions at Target stores (including stores in Massachusetts) from Nov. 27, 2013 to Dec. 15, 2013. The stolen data included consumers’ full names, telephone numbers, email addresses, mailing addresses, payment card numbers, expiration dates, security codes, and encrypted debit PINs... The breach affected more than 41 million customer payment card accounts and contact information for more than 60 million customers nationwide. In Massachusetts, the breach compromised information from approximately 947,000 customer payment card accounts and other personally-identifying information of about 1.5 million Massachusetts residents."

Terms of the settlement require Target:

"... to develop, implement and maintain a comprehensive information security program and to employ an executive or officer who is responsible for executing the plan. The company is required to hire an independent, qualified third-party to conduct a comprehensive security assessment... to maintain and support software on its network; to maintain appropriate encryption policies, particularly as pertains to cardholder and personal information data; to segment its cardholder data environment from the rest of its computer network; and to undertake steps to control access to its network, including implementing password rotation policies and two-factor authentication for certain accounts."

California will receive $1.4 million from the settlement. New York AG Eric T. Schneiderman said about the settlement agreement:

"New Yorkers need to know that when they shop, their data will be protected... This settlement marks an important win for New Yorkers – bringing over $635,000 into the state, in addition to the free credit monitoring services for those impacted by the data breach, and key security improvements to help protect Target consumers moving forward."

Yes, indeed. Shoppers everywhere need to know their data will be protected.

Besides Massachusetts, New York and California, the other states participating in this settlement include Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

AL.com reported:

"Alabama won't be cashing in on the largest multi-state data breach settlement in history, however. The reason, according to the Alabama Attorney General's Office, is the absence of a state law that requires entities to notify customers whose information could have been exposed in a breach and then take steps to remediate any injuries.

"Alabama is one of the few states in the nation that is not a party to the recent Target settlement because our state does not have data breach notification law," said Mike Lewis, Communications Director for the Office of the Alabama Attorney General."

Connecticut and Illinois led the states' investigation. The participating states have not yet announced how the settlement money will be distributed.

[Editor's Note: a prior version of this blog post did not include the report by AL.com.]


Hacking Group Reported Security Issues With Samsung 8 Phone's Iris Recognition

Image of Samsung Galaxy S8 phones. Click to view larger version The Computer Chaos Club (CCC), a German hacking group founded in 1981, posted the following report on Monday:

"The iris recognition system of the new Samsung Galaxy S8 was successfully defeated by hackers... The Samsung Galaxy S8 is the first flagship smartphone with iris recognition. The manufacturer of the biometric solution is the company Princeton Identity Inc. The system promises secure individual user authentication by using the unique pattern of the human iris.

A new test conducted by CCC hackers shows that this promise cannot be kept: With a simple to make dummy-eye the phone can be fooled into believing that it sees the eye of the legitimate owner. A video shows the simplicity of the method."

The Samsung Galaxy S8 runs the Android operating system, claims a talk time of up to 30 hours, has a screen optimized for virtual reality (VR) apps, and features Bixby, an "... intelligent interface that is built into the Galaxy S8. With every interaction, Bixby can learn, evolve and adapt to you. Whether it's through touch, type or voice, Bixby will seamlessly help you get things done. (Voice coming soon)"

The CCC report also explained:

"Iris recognition may be barely sufficient to protect a phone against complete strangers unlocking it. But whoever has a photo of the legitimate owner can trivially unlock the phone. "If you value the data on your phone – and possibly want to even use it for payment – using the traditional PIN-protection is a safer approach than using body features for authentication," says Dirk Engling, spokesperson for the CCC."

Phys.org reported that Samsung executives are investigating the CCC report. Samsung views the Galaxy S8 as critical to the company's performance given the Note 7 battery issues and fires last year.

Some consumers might conclude from the CCC report that the best defense against against iris hacks would be to stop posting selfies. This would be wrong to conclude, and an insufficient defense:

"The easiest way for a thief to capture iris pictures is with a digital camera in night-shot mode or the infrared filter removed... Starbug was able to demonstrate that a good digital camera with 200mm-lens at a distance of up to five meters is sufficient to capture suitably good pictures to fool iris recognition systems."

So, more photos besides selfies could reveal your iris details. The CCC report also reminded consumers of the security issues with using fingerprints to protect their devices:

"CCC member and biometrics security researcher starbug has demonstrated time and again how easily biometrics can be defeated with his hacks on fingerprint authentication systems – most recently with his successful defeat of the fingerprint sensor "Touch ID" on Apple’s iPhone. "The security risk to the user from iris recognition is even bigger than with fingerprints as we expose our irises a lot. Under some circumstances, a high-resolution picture from the internet is sufficient to capture an iris," Dirk Engling remarked."

What are your opinions of the CCC report?


The Top Complaints About Financial Services. One Complaint Type Grew 325 Percent

Logo for Consumer Financial Protection Bureau After encountering unresolved issues with financial services, many consumers file complaints with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). After each complain, the CFP works hard to get each consumer a reply within 15 days. This process allows the CFPB to track which issues affect most consumers, and to identify emerging problems.

According to its April Monthly Complaint Report, debt collection issues generated the most complaints on average, and complaints about student loans grew the fastest:

"As of April 1, 2017, the CFPB has handled approximately 1,163,200 complaints, including approximately 28,000 complaints in March 2017... Student loan complaints showed the greatest percentage increase from January - March 2016 (773 complaints) to January - March 2017 (3,284 complaints), representing about a 325 percent increase. Part of this year-to-year increase can be attributed to the CFPB updating its student loan complaint form to accept complaints about Federal student loan servicing in late February 2016. The CFPB also initiated an enforcement action against a student loan servicer during this time period."

CFPB Monthly Compalint Report. April, 2017. Table 1. Click to view larger version

The top five categories of complaints about during March, 2017:

  1. Debt collection: 8,711
  2. Credit reporting: 5,498
  3. Mortgages: 3,965
  4. Credit cards: 2,522
  5. Bank account or service: 2,476

Also during March: debt collection complaints represented about 31 percent of complaints; debt collection, credit reporting and mortgage were the top three most-complained-about consumer financial products and services. Together, these three categories represented 65 percent of complaints during March.

The top five categories of complaints since the CFPB began:

  1. Debt collection: 316,810
  2. Mortgages: 272,153
  3. Credit reporting: 195,826
  4. Credit cards: 118,732
  5. Bank account or service: 115,055

The CFPB began accepting complaints for different products and services at different times:

There were regional differences in complaint volume:

"Montana (54 percent), Georgia (46 percent), and Wyoming (45 percent) experienced the greatest complaint volume percentage increase from January - March 2016 to January - March 2017. New Mexico (-20 percent), Iowa (-5 percent), and Kansas (-0.7 percent) experienced the greatest complaint volume percentage decrease... Of the five most populated states, Texas (35 percent) experienced the greatest complaint volume percentage increase and Florida (8 percent) experienced the least complaint volume percentage increase from January - March 2016 to January - March 2017."

The report also tracks complaints by company:

CFPB Monthly Complaint Report. April, 2017. Figure 1. Click to view larger version

The CFPB reported additional details about student loan complaints:

"Approximately 32,700 (or 74 percent) of all student loan complaints handled by the CFPB from July 21, 2011 through March 31, 2017 were sent by the CFPB to companies for review and response. The remaining complaints have been found to be incomplete (7 percent), referred to other regulatory agencies (19 percent), or are pending with the CFPB or the consumer (0.5 percent and 0.4 percent, respectively)... The most common issues identified by consumers are problems dealing with their lenders or servicers (64 percent) and being unable to repay their loans (33 percent)."

"Federal student loan borrowers reported that when contacting their loan servicers regarding financial distress, servicers provided them with information on hardship forbearance or deferment, instead of potentially more beneficial repayment options like income-driven repayment plans... loan borrowers complained of difficulty enrolling in income-driven repayment plans. Borrowers reported lost documentation, extended application processing times, and unclear guidance when seeking to switch from one income-driven repayment plan to another."

Federal student loan borrowers described their experiences when trying to obtain guidance in completing annual income recertification for their income-driven repayment plan. Borrowers reported receiving insufficient information from their servicers to meet recertification deadlines and lengthy processing times. Some federal student loan borrowers stated their payments were misapplied. Borrowers reported overpayments were not applied to specified accounts but rather applied to all accounts managed by the servicer. Additionally, some borrowers’ overpayments—intended to reduce principal balance—were credited to the account as an early payment, resulting in their ac count reflecting a paid ahead status..."

To read more, download the full "April 2017: CFPB Monthly Complaint Report: Vol. 22" (Adobe PDF).


Speech By FCC Chairman. Time For Citizens To Fight To Keep Net Neutrality Protections

Federal communications Commission logo Earlier today, Ajit Pai, the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), gave a speech titled, "The Future Of Internet Freedom" at the Newseum in Washington, DC. He discussed the history of the Internet, regulation, business investment, innovation, and jobs. He also shared his views on regulation and a desire for the FCC's to pursue a "light touch" regulatory approach:

"First, we are proposing to return the classification of broadband service from a Title II telecommunications service to a Title I information service—that is, light-touch regulation drawn from the Clinton Administration.  As I mentioned earlier, this Title I classification was expressly upheld by the Supreme Court in 2005, and it’s more consistent with the facts and the law.

Second, we are proposing to eliminate the so-called Internet conduct standard. This 2015 rule gives the FCC a roving mandate to micromanage the Internet... The FCC used the Internet conduct standard to launch a wide-ranging investigation of free-data programs. Under these programs, wireless companies offer their customers the ability to stream music, video, and the like free from any data limits. They are very popular among consumers, particularly lower-income Americans... Following the presidential election, we terminated this investigation before the FCC was able to take any formal action. But we shouldn’t leave the Internet conduct standard on the books for a future Commission to make mischief.

And third, we are seeking comment on how we should approach the so-called bright-line rules adopted in 2015. But you won’t just have to take my word about what is in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. I will be publicly releasing the entire text of the document tomorrow afternoon..."

This should not be a surprise. We've heard much of this before from Congresswoman Blackburn, the author of the recently passed House legislation to roll back consumers' online privacy protection. Blackburn said the same about FCC reclassification; that it was bad, and that the internet wasn't broken. Well it was broken prior to to 2014, and in several specific ways.

The lack of ISP competition in key markets meant consumers in the United States pay more for broadband and get slower speeds compared to other countries. Rural consumers and low-income areas lacked broadband services. There were numerous complaints by consumers about usage Based Internet Pricing. There were privacy abuses and settlement agreements by ISPs involving technologies such as deep-packet inspection and 'Supercookies' to track customers online, despite consumers' wishes not to be tracked. Many consumers didn't get the broadband speeds ISP promised. Some consumers sued their ISPs, and the New York State Attorney General invited residents to check their broadband speed with this tool. Tim Berners-Lee, the founder of the internet, cited in March three reasons why the Internet is in trouble. His number one reason: consumers had lost control of their personal information. With all of this evidence, how can Pai and Blackburn claim the internet wasn't broken?

There are more examples. Some consumers found that their ISP hijacked their online search results without notice nor consent. An ISP in Kansas admitted in 2008 to secret snooping after pressure from Congress. Given all of this, something had to be done. The FCC stepped up to the plate and acted when it was legally able to; and reclassified broadband after open hearings. Then, the FCC adopted new privacy rules in November, 2016. Proposed rules were circulated prior to adoption. It was done in the open. It made sense.

Meanwhile, the rollback of FCC broadband privacy rules is very unpopular among consumers. Comments by Pai and Blackburn seem to ignore both that and key events (listed above) in broadband history. That is practicing the "revisionist history" Pai said in his speech he disliked. That leaves me questioning whether they can be trusted to develop reasonable solutions that serve the interests of consumers.

With their victory last month to roll back the FCC's online privacy protections, pro-big-telecom advocates claim they are acting in consumers' best interests. What bull. With that rollback, consumers are no longer in control of their information. (The opt-in and other controls were killed.) Plus, we live in a capitalist society where the information that describes us is valuable property. That's why so many companies want to collect it. Consumers should be in control of their online privacy and the information that describes them, not corporate ISPs.

Corporate ISPs' next target is "net neutrality." Pai referred to it in the "bright lines" portion of his speech. For those who don't know or have forgotten, net neutrality is when consumers are in control -- consumers choose where to go online with the broadband they've purchased, and when ISPs must treat all content equally. That means no blocking, no throttling, and no paid prioritization. Net neutrality means consumers stay in control of where they go online.

Pai claimed this was unclear. Again, more bull. The FCC's no blocking, no throttling, and no paid prioritization position was crystal clear.

Without net neutrality, ISPs decide where consumers can go online, which sites you can visit, and which sites you can visit only if you pay more. ISPs would likely group web sites into tiers (e.g., slow vs. fast "lanes"), similar to premium cable-TV channels. Do you want your monthly internet bill as confusing, complicated, and expensive as your cable-TV bill? I don't, and I doubt you do either.

Pai and Blackburn claim that net neutrality (and privacy) kills innovation. I guess that depends how you define "innovation." If you define innovation as the ability of ISPs to carve up the internet to maximize they profits where consumers pay more, then it should be killed. That's not innovation. That's customer segmentation by price and paid prioritization.

In his speech, Pai provided an appealing explanation about how ISPs spent less on infrastructure. He neglected to mention that decreased infrastructure spending was a choice by ISPs. They could have cut expenses elsewhere and continued infrastructure spending, but they didn't. Instead, ISPs chose the path we see: utilize a compliant, sympathetic Republican-led Congress and White House to get what they wanted -- the ability to charge higher broadband prices -- and use slick, misleading language to appear to be consumer friendly.

Take action today to defend net neutrality protections. Fight For The Future The Pai-led FCC isn't consumer friendly. The GOP-led Congress isn't, either. Regardless of how they spin it. Don't be fooled.

Anyone paying attention already knows this. Concerned citizens fought for and won net neutrality in 2014. Sadly, we might fight the net neutrality fight again.

It will be an uphill fight for two reasons. First, Republicans control the White House, House of Representatives, and Senate. Second, the Trump Administration is working simultaneously on rollbacks for several key issues (e.g., health care, immigration, wall along Mexican border, tax reform, environment, education, terrorism, etc.), making it easier to distract opponents with other issues (and with outrageous midnight tweets). Yet, people demonstrated last week at an open FCC meeting. (Video is also available here.) Now is the time for more concerned citizens to rise, speak up, and fight back. Write to your elected officials. Tell your friends, classmates, coworkers, and family members. Use this action form to contact your elected officials. Participate in local marches and protests. Join the Fight For The Future. Support the EFF.

Some elected officials have already committed to defend net neutrality protections:

What about your elected officials? Have they made a commitment to defend net neutrality? Ask them. Don't be silent. Now is not the time to sit on the sideline and wait for others to do the fighting for you.


A Cautionary Tale About The Internet Of Things And The CRFA

The internet-of-things devices consumers installed in their homes aren't really theirs. Oh, consumers paid good money for these smart devices, but the devices aren't really theirs. How so you ask? The cautionary tale below explains.

Unhappy with Garadget, an internet-connected garage-door opener he bought, Robert Martin posted negative reviews on both Garadget's official discussion board (username: rdmart7) and on Garadget's Amazon page. Unhappy with those negative reviews, Denis Grisak, the device's creator, responded initially by disabling internet access to the mobile app Martin used to operate his device. Grisak angrily said Martin could return his device for a refund.

You might call that a digital mugging.

The disagreement escalated and Grisak also disabled Martin's access to the Garadget discussion board and to Martin's online profile. You can read the entire story by The Atlantic. There are several items to learn from this incident. First, as The Atlantic concluded:

"Even just an angry moment can turn a smart device into a dead one."

Clearly, the device creator overreacted by disabling internet access. Grisak later softened his position and restored Martin's online connections. However, the incident highlights the fact that in the heat of the moment, angry (or ethically-challenged) and revengeful device makers can easily and quickly disable smart devices. It doesn't matter that consumers legally paid for those devices.

Second, end-user license agreements (EULA) matter. Terms of service policies matter. Most consumers never read these documents, and they matter greatly. The incident is a reminder of the "gag clauses" some companies insert into policies to silence negative reviews. This incident highlights a technical tactic ethically-challenged device makers can use to enforce gag clauses.

And it's not only device makers. In 2009, some physicians tried to force patients to sign, “Consent And Mutual Agreement to Maintain Privacy” (MAMP) policy documents. Don’t be fooled by the policy name, which is a fancy label for a gag clause. The policy document usually requires the patient to give up their rights to mention that physician on any social networking sites.

Third, legislation and consumer protections matter. The Atlantic reported:

"Some commenters on Amazon and Hacker News wondered whether Grisak’s public online revenge was legal. One person encouraged Martin to reach out to his state attorney general’s office. That’s a complicated question... A bill signed into law signed in December prohibits companies from including “gag clauses” in the contracts they enter into with customers, meaning they can’t bring legal action against someone just for a negative review."

That new law is the "Consumer Review Fairness Act" (CRFA - H.R. 5111) which protects consumers' rights to share their honest opinions online about any product or service.The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) explains the CRFA and provides guidance:

"The law protects a broad variety of honest consumer assessments, including online reviews, social media posts, uploaded photos, videos, etc. And it doesn’t just cover product reviews. It also applies to consumer evaluations of a company’s customer service... the Act makes it illegal for a company to use a contract provision that: a) bars or restricts the ability of a person who is a party to that contract to review a company’s products, services, or conduct; b) imposes a penalty or fee against someone who gives a review; or c) requires people to give up their intellectual property rights in the content of their reviews.

The [CRFA] makes it illegal for companies to include standardized provisions that threaten or penalize people for posting honest reviews. For example, in an online transaction, it would be illegal for a company to include a provision in its terms and conditions that prohibits or punishes negative reviews by customers. (The law doesn’t apply to employment contracts or agreements with independent contractors, however.) The law says it’s OK to prohibit or remove a review that: 1) contains confidential or private information – for example, a person’s financial, medical, or personnel file information or a company’s trade secrets; 2) is libelous, harassing, abusive, obscene, vulgar, sexually explicit, or is inappropriate with respect to race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, or other intrinsic characteristic; 3) is unrelated to the company’s products or services; or 4) is clearly false or misleading."

However, the CRFA won't stop device makers from disabling the mobile apps and/or smart devices of consumers who have posted negative reviews. And, an online search easily retrieves physicians' sites still displaying MAMP policy documents. I guess that not everyone is aware of the CRFA.

Fourth, the consumer backlash has begun against smart devices with allegedly poor security. The @Internetofshit blogger (on Twitter and on Facebook) tracks and discusses such devices and device makers' actions that allegedly violate the CRFA. The discussion recently included Garadget:

Tweet by Internetofshit blogger about Garadget. Click to view larger version

What are your opinions of the Garadget incident? Of the CRFA? Of smart device security?


President Trump Signed Legislation Revoking FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules. Lots Of Consequences

Late yesterday, President Trump signed legislation revoking broadband privacy rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The rules would have kept consumers in control of their information online. Instead, internet service providers (ISPs) are free to collect, archive, and share at will without notice nor consent information about consumers' online activities (e.g., far more than browsing histories).

The legislation narrowly passed both in the Senate (50 - 48) and in the House (210 - 205). Proponents of the legislation claimed duplicate legislation. Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), who introduced the legislation in the House, said plenty recently according to Breitbart News:

"What we are doing is recalling a privacy rule that the FCC issued right at the end of the Obama administration, and the reason we are doing this is because it is additional and duplicative regulation... What the FCC did was clearly overreach. It gives you two sets of regulators that you’re trying to comply with, not one. So we are recalling the FCC’s rule, and that authority will go back to the FTC...”

"What the Obama administration did... they reclassified your Internet service as Title II, which is a common carrier classification. It is the rule that governs telephone usage... Those rules were put on the books in the thirties. So what the Democrats did... they reclassified Internet, which is an information service, as a telephone service, and then put those 1930s-era rules on top of your Internet service... They did that so they could tax it, so they could begin to regulate it..."

"You don’t need another layer of regulation. It’s like flashing alerts: We don’t need net neutrality. We don’t need Title II. We don’t need additional regulations heaped on the Internet under Title II. The Internet is not broken. It has done just fine without the government controlling it."

Not broken? The founder of the internet, Tim Berners-Lee gave three solid reasons why the internet is broken. His number one reason: consumers have lost control over their personal information.

And, Representative Blackburn either doesn't know history or has chosen to ignore it. Several problems have plagued the industry: a lack of ISP competition in key markets, consumers in the United States pay more for broadband and get slower speeds compared to other countries, and numerous privacy violations and lawsuits:

Clearly, the FCC had to act, it did, it held hearings, and then finalized improved broadband privacy rules to help consumers. Now, the Congress and President undid all of that.

There are plenty of consequences. To regain some online privacy lost due to the new legislation, many consumers have considered Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) and other online tools to prevent ISPs from spying on them. VPNs are not a cure-all. ISPs can still block or throttle consumers' VPN connection, and VPNs won't protect e-mail nor internet-of-things devices installed in homes.

Basically, there is no substitute for consumers being in control of their online privacy with transparent notice by ISPs. The impact upon consumers: less online privacy and higher internet prices. Consumers are forced to spend more money on VPN and other tools.

Blackburn and others claimed that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) should regulate ISPs. Regulation by the FTC is not a slam-dunk. AdAge reported:

"If the FTC does regain its oversight, the result is likely to be weaker privacy protections than what the FCC intended with its rules, as well as a relatively clear path for telcos to pursue their data-revenue-generating goals... One legal peak to climb: precedent set by a U.S district court ruling siding with AT&T against the FTC last year which carved out an exemption for companies that provide bundled phone and ISP services which effectively protected AT&T from FTC regulations protecting consumers from unfair or deceptive practices.

Even if the FTC eventually garners ISP jurisdiction, argued [Gigi Sohn, a senior counselor to former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler], "it will lead to some privacy protection but much weaker than what people just lost." She pointed to FTC Chairman Ohlausen's high bar for showing harm against consumers before actions against companies are taken, noting, "She wants to see harm first. Well, rules protect you before you're harmed." "

Despite the claims by Blackburn and others, the bottom line is:

"... what we're left with is a period of uncertainty where the carriers may do certain things but it's unclear. Does the FCC have jurisdiction or does the FTC have jurisdiction?"

The Los Angeles Times reported:

"The FTC is empowered to bring lawsuits against companies that violate its privacy guidelines, but it has no authority to create new rules for industry. It also cannot enforce its own guidelines against Internet providers because of a government rule that places those types of companies squarely within the jurisdiction of the FCC and out of the reach of the FTC. As a result, Internet providers exist in a "policy gap" in which the only privacy regulators for the industry operate at the state, not federal, level, analysts say."

Ambiguity. Lack of clarity. Policy gap. None of those are good for business, or for consumers.

Read more about President Trump's signing of the legislation at C/Net and Reuters.


Tools For Consumers To Regain Some Online Privacy. Higher Internet Prices Likely

Now that the Republican-led Congress and President Trump have dismantled broadband privacy rules, internet service providers (ISPs) are free to collect, archive, and share at will without disclosure consumers' complete online activities (e.g., far more than browsing histories) to maximize their profits. Just about all of your online activities are harvested by ISPs, not just your browsing histories. Readers of this blog may remember the Deep-Packet Inspection software some ISPs installed on their servers to track their customers' online usage without notice nor consent.

To combat this, many consumers seek technical solutions, such as a virtual private network (VPN), to maintain as much privacy online as possible. Consumers will need to locate VPN and other tools than run on several devices (e.g., phones, tablets, laptops, desktops, etc.) and browsers (e.g., Firefox, Opera, etc.). Resources about several tools including VPNs:

Reviews and comparisons about VPN providers:

Some recommended, paid VPNs run on several platforms including Apple brand devices: F-Secure Freedome, Private Internet Access, and SurfEasy. Some VPNs offer a lower monthly price for a longer contract term. Look for pricing that covers multiple devices.

All of the above resources contain links to specific VPN brands. Experts recommend that consumers shop around for a paid VPN, since many of the free VPNs collect and resell consumers' information to make money. Some VPN providers offer phone customer service and support. This may be especially helpful for inexperienced users.

If a (free or paid) VPN saves usage logs of its customers' online activity and shares those logs with others (e.g., advertisers, affiliates, marketing partners, law enforcement, etc.), then that totally defeats the purpose of using a VPN service for privacy. So wise consumers shop around, read the terms of service, and read the privacy policy before signing up for a VPN.

Just like anti-virus software, several VPNs running on the same device can cause problems. So, you'll need to spend time sorting that out, too.

Sadly, VPNs are not a cure-all. Your ISP can still block or throttle your connection. Basically, there is no substitute for consumers being in control of their online privacy with transparent notice by ISPs. And, VPNs won't protect internet-of-things devices (e.g., appliances, refrigerators, thermostats, security systems, televisions, etc.) connected in to the WiFi router in your home. Tech Dirt reported:

"VPN clients are typically for desktop machines and, in some cases, mobile devices such as phones and tablets. As previously discussed, IoT devices in homes will continue to generate more traffic. Most such devices do not support VPN software. While it is conceivable that a user could set up an encrypted VPN tunnel from the home router and route all home traffic through a VPN, typical home gateways don’t easily support this functionality at this point, and configuring such a setup would be cumbersome for the typical user."

Note: VPN services don't protect e-mail. ISPs user a different set of servers for e-mail (e.g., SMTP, SMTPS) versus web browsing (e.g., HTTP, HTTPS). You might consider a secure e-mail service like ProtonMail. You might find this review of ProtonMail helpful.

Do you use Gmail? Remember Google scans both inbound and outbound e-mail messages supposedly to serve up relevant ads. While a certain amount of message scanning is appropriate to identify spam and malware, last month a federal court judge rejected a proposed settlement offer with non-Gmail users who had filed a class-action lawsuit because their e-mail messages had been scanned by Google (and they couldn't opt out of the scanning).

So, internet costs for consumers are going up with thanks to privacy-busting legislation passed by a Republican-led Congress. Consumers will pay more, perhaps an additional $50 - $80 yearly for VPN services, on top of already high monthly internet prices -- with a marginal increase in privacy; not the better, more complete solution consumers would have received with the FCC broadband privacy rules. Add in the value of your time spent shopping around for VPN and privacy tools, and the price increase is even greater.

Plus, monthly internet costs for consumers could go far higher if ISPs charge for online privacy. Is that possible you ask? Yep. Comcast and industry lobbyists have already stated that they want "pay-for-privacy" schemes. Congress seems happy to oblige corporate ISPs and stick it to consumers.

Petition to keep FCC broadband privacy rules and nullify Senate Joint Resolution 34 Mad about all of this? You probably are, too. I am. Be sure to tell your Senators and House representatives that voted to revoke FCC online privacy rules. Tell them you dislike the higher prices you're forced to pay to maintain privacy online.

Do any VPN providers act as fronts for government intelligence and spy agencies? I do not have the resources to determine this. Perhaps, some enterprising white-hat users can shed some light on this.

What online privacy resources have you found?


Maker Of Smart Vibrators To Pay $3.75 Million To Settle Privacy Lawsuit

Today's smart homes contain a variety of internet-connected appliances -- televisions, utility meters, hot water heaters, thermostats, refrigerators, security systems-- and devices you might not expect to have WiFi connections:  mouse traps, wine bottlescrock pots, toy dolls, and trash/recycle bins. Add smart vibrators to the list.

We-Vibe logo We-Vibe, a maker of vibrators for better sex, will pay U.S. $3.75 million to settle a class action lawsuit involving allegations that the company tracked users without their knowledge nor consent. The Guardian reported:

"Following a class-action lawsuit in an Illinois federal court, We-Vibe’s parent company Standard Innovation has been ordered to pay a total of C$4m to owners, with those who used the vibrators associated app entitled to the full amount each. Those who simply bought the vibrator can claim up to $199... the app came with a number of security and privacy vulnerabilities... The app that controls the vibrator is barely secured, allowing anyone within bluetooth range to seize control of the device. In addition, data is collected and sent back to Standard Innovation, letting the company know about the temperature of the device and the vibration intensity – which, combined, reveal intimate information about the user’s sexual habits..."

Image of We-Vibe 4 Plus product with phone. Click to view larger version We-Vibe's products are available online at the Canadian company's online store and at Amazon. This Youtube video (warning: not safe for work) promotes the company's devices. Consumers can use the smart vibrator with or without the mobile app on their smartphones. The app is available at both the Apple iTunes and Google Play online stores.

Like any other digital device, security matters. C/Net reported last summer:

"... two security researchers who go by the names followr and g0ldfisk found flaws in the software that controls the [We-Vibe 4Plus] device. It could potentially let a hacker take over the vibrator while it's in use. But that's -- at this point -- only theoretical. What the researchers found more concerning was the device's use of personal data. Standard Innovation collects information on the temperature of the device and the intensity at which it's vibrating, in real time, the researchers found..."

In the September 2016 complaint (Adobe PDF; 601 K bytes), the plaintiffs sought to stop Standard Innovation from "monitoring, collecting, and transmitting consumers’ usage information," collect damages due to the alleged unauthorized data collection and privacy violations, and reimburse users from their purchase of their We-Vibe devices (because a personal vibrator with this alleged data collection is worth less than a personal vibrator without data collection). That complaint alleged:

"Unbeknownst to its customers, however, Defendant designed We-Connect to (i) collect and record highly intimate and sensitive data regarding consumers’ personal We-Vibe use, including the date and time of each use and the selected vibration settings, and (ii) transmit such usage data — along with the user’s personal email address — to its servers in Canada... By design, the defining feature of the We-Vibe device is the ability to remotely control it through We-Connect. Defendant requires customers to use We-Connect to fully access the We-Vibe’s features and functions. Yet, Defendant fails to notify or warn customers that We-Connect monitors and records, in real time, how they use the device. Nor does Defendant disclose that it transmits the collected private usage information to its servers in Canada... Defendant programmed We-Connect to secretly collect intimate details about its customers’ use of the We-Vibe, including the date and time of each use, the vibration intensity level selected by the user, the vibration mode or patterns selected by the user, and incredibly, the email address of We-Vibe customers who had registered with the App, allowing Defendant to link the usage information to specific customer accounts... In addition, Defendant designed We-Connect to surreptitiously route information from the “connect lover” feature to its servers. For instance, when partners use the “connect lover” feature and one takes remote control of the We-Vibe device or sends a [text or video chat] communication, We-Connect causes all of the information to be routed to its servers, and then collects, at a minimum, certain information about the We-Vibe, including its temperature and battery life. That is, despite promising to create “a secure connection between your smartphones,” Defendant causes all communications to be routed through its servers..."

The We-Vibe Nova product page lists ten different vibration modes (e.g., Crest, Pulse, Wave, Echo, Cha-cha-cha, etc.), or users can create their own custom modes. The settlement agreement defined two groups of affected consumers:

"... the proposed Purchaser Class, consisting of: all individuals in the United States who purchased a Bluetooth-enabled We-Vibe Brand Product before September 26, 2016. As provided in the Settlement Agreement, “We-Vibe Brand Product” means the “We-Vibe® Classic; We-Vibe® 4 Plus; We-Vibe® 4 Plus App Only; Rave by We-VibeTM and Nova by We-VibeTM... the proposed App Class, consisting of: all individuals in the United States who downloaded the We-Connect application and used it to control a We-Vibe Brand Product before September 26, 2016."

According to the settlement agreement, affected users will be notified by e-mail addresses, with notices in the We-Connect mobile app, a settlement website (to be created), a "one-time half of a page summary publication notice in People Magazine and Sports Illustrated," and by online advertisements in several websites such as Google, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest. The settlement site will likely specify additional information including any deadlines and additional notices.

We-Vibe announced in its blog on October 3, 2016 several security improvements:

"... we updated the We-ConnectTM app and our app privacy notice. That update includes: a) Enhanced communication regarding our privacy practices and data collection – in both the onboarding process and in the app settings; b) No registration or account creation. Customers do not provide their name, email or phone number or other identifying information to use We-Connect; c) An option for customers to opt-out of sharing anonymous app usage data is available in the We-Connect settings; d) A new plain language Privacy Notice outlines how we collect and use data for the app to function and to improve We-Vibe products."

I briefly reviewed the We-Connect App Privacy Policy (dated September 26, 2016) linked from the Google Play store. When buying digital products online, often the privacy policy for the mobile app is different than the privacy policy for the website. (Informed shoppers read both.) Some key sections from the app privacy policy:

"Collection And Use of Information: You can use We-Vibe products without the We-Connect app. No information related to your use of We-Vibe products is collected from you if you don’t install and use the app."

I don't have access to the prior version of the privacy policy. That last sentence seems clear and should be a huge warning to prospective users about the data collection. More from the policy:

"We collect and use information for the purposes identified below... To access and use certain We-Vibe product features, the We-Connect app must be installed on an iOS or Android enabled device and paired with a We-Vibe product. We do not ask you to provide your name, address or other personally identifying information as part of the We-Connect app installation process or otherwise... The first time you launch the We-Connect app, our servers will provide you with an anonymous token. The We-Connect app will use this anonymous token to facilitate connections and share control of your We-Vibe with your partner using the Connect Lover feature... certain limited data is required for the We-Connect app to function on your device. This data is collected in a way that does not personally identify individual We-Connect app users. This data includes the type of device hardware and operating system, unique device identifier, IP address, language settings, and the date and time the We-Connect app accesses our servers. We also collect certain information to facilitate the exchange of messages between you and your partner, and to enable you to adjust vibration controls. This data is also collected in a way that does not personally identify individual We-Connect app users."

In a way that does not personally identify individuals? What way? Is that the "anonymous token" or something else? More clarity seems necessary.

Consumers should read the app privacy policy and judge for themselves. Me? I am skeptical. Why? The "unique device identifier" can be used exactly for that... to identify a specific phone. The IP address associated with each mobile device can also be used to identify specific persons. Match either number to the user's 10-digit phone number (readily available on phones), and it seems that one can easily re-assemble anonymously collected data afterwards to make it user-specific.

And since partner(s) can remotely control a user's We-Vibe device, their information is collected, too. Persons with multiple partners (and/or multiple We-Vibe devices) should thoroughly consider the implications.

The About Us page in the We-Vibe site contains this company description:

"We-Vibe designs and manufactures world-leading couples and solo vibrators. Our world-class engineers and industrial designers work closely with sexual wellness experts, doctors and consumers to design and develop intimate products that work in sync with the human body. We use state-of-the-art techniques and tools to make sure our products set new industry standards for ergonomic design and high performance while remaining eco‑friendly and body-safe."

Hmmmm. No mentions of privacy nor security. Hopefully, a future About Us page revision will mention privacy and security. Hopefully, no government officials use these or other branded smart sex toys. This is exactly the type of data collection spies will use to embarrass and/or blackmail targets.

The settlement is a reminder that companies are willing, eager, and happy to exploit consumers' failure to read privacy policies. A study last year found that 74 percent of consumers surveyed never read privacy policies.

All of this should be a reminder to consumers that companies highly value the information they collect about their users, and generate additional revenue streams by selling information collected to corporate affiliates, advertisers, marketing partners, and/or data brokers. Consumers' smartphones are central to that data collection.

What are your opinions of the We-Vibe settlement? Of its products and security?


Smart Mouse Traps: A Good Deal For Consumers?

Rentokil logo Rentokil, a pest control company, has introduced in the United Kingdom a new pest-control device for consumers wanting the latest WiFi technology. The company introduced ResiConnect, an Internet-connected mouse trap. A Rentokil representative explained to the Register UK newspaper:

“This is a trap that’s connected to the internet, essentially. Whereas there are other standard traps on the market that just catch and kill the mouse, that mouse can be caught in that trap for several weeks or several months. What this does is sends us a signal to notify us the trap has been activated, which allows us to respond... What this allows us to do is catch, kill and contain the mouse... and provide the best solution to the customer as well.”

Rentokil technician and vehicle Reportedly, the device sells for about £1,300, or about U.S. $1,300. Last summer, Rentokil Initial Plc announced a partnership with Google and PA Consulting Group (PA) to deploy globally the company's:

"... innovative digital pest control products and, in the future, to the development of ‘next generation’ services to offer customers new levels of proactive risk management against the threat of pest infestation... Rentokil has developed and begun to roll out its range of connected rodent control products particularly to customers in the tightly regulated food and pharmaceutical industries. In the field today, Rentokil has over 20,000 digital devices running in 12 countries which have now sent more than 3 million pieces of data.

The new digital pest control services use connected rodent devices with embedded sensors and mobile connectivity. The units communicate with Rentokil’s online ‘Command Centre’ and when they've caught a rodent, the technician is automatically alerted while customers are kept informed through myRentokil, the industry’s leading online portal... Built on Google’s Cloud Platform, and delivered by PA using Agile techniques, this technology is highly scalable and is now ready to be deployed more widely to existing and new customers from Q4 2016 and to other parts of the company..."

It seems that Rentokil is making available to consumers smart traps similar to those already deployed in the commercial market, such as fast food restaurants with multiple locations. Rentokil sells in the United States a device that uses radar to detect and capture mice. This raises the question: do consumers really need a smart mouse trap?

I have direct experience with mice. The building where I live is contains condominiums, and I have the responsibility to pay the condo association's monthly bills (e.g., water, insurance, and electricity), plus hire vendors and contractors, as needed, for repairs and maintenance. That includes pest control companies. Last week, our pest-control vendor deployed bait traps (e.g., poison and glue strips) in all units, plus the basement (with utilities and storage areas).

Obviously, owners of retail stores with multiple locations (e.g., fast food restaurants) would benefit from smart mouse traps. It seems cost-prohibitive to send (and pay for) technicians to visit each store and check multiple traps, while only selective traps would have caught rodents.

First, the benefit for residential customers sees marginal. Internet-connected mouse trap might appeal to squeamish consumers, who are afraid or unsure what to do, but it's hard to beat the convenience and low cost of a phone call. For our condo association, it was easy to know when a trap has caught a mouse. You heard the squeaking.

For us, the rodent removal process was easy. After a quick phone call the evening the mouse was caught, a pest-control technician arrived the next morning. The company sent a technician that was already in the area for nearby service calls. The technician removed the mouse stuck on a glue strip, checked, and re-baited several traps. That visit was included in the price we paid, and the phone call cost was negligible.

Second, the price seems expensive. The $1,600 price for a smart mouse trap equals about three years of what our condo association pays for pest control services.

Reliability and trust with smart devices are critical for consumers. A recent global study found that 44 percent of consumers are concerned about financial information theft via smart home devices, and 37 percent are concerned about identity theft.

Informed shoppers know that not all smart devices are built equally. Some have poor security features or lack software upgrades. These vulnerabilities create opportunities for bad guys to hack and infect consumers' home WiFi networks with malware to steal passwords and money, create spam, and use infected devices as part of DDoS attacks targeting businesses. (Yes, even the hosting service for this blog was targeted.) So, it is wise to understand any smart trap's software and security features before purchase.

What do you think? Are smart mouse traps worthwhile?


FCC Announced Approval ot LTE-U Mobile Devices

On Wednesday, the Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) within the U.S. Federal Communications announced the authorization of unlicensed wireless (a/k/a LTE-U) devices to operate in the 5 GHz band:

"This action follows a collaborative industry process to ensure LTE-U with Wi-Fi and other unlicensed devices operating in the 5 GHz band. The Commission’s provisions for unlicensed devices are designed to prevent harmful interference to radio communications services and stipulate that these devices must accept any harmful interference they receive. Industry has developed various standards within the framework of these rules such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Zigbee that are designed to coexist in shared spectrum. These and other unlicensed technologies have been deployed extensively and are used by consumers and industry for a wide variety of applications.

LTE-U is a specification that was developed and supported by a group of companies within the LTE-U Forum... The LTE-U devices that were certified today have been tested to show they meet all of the FCC’s rules. We understand that the LTE-U devices were evaluated successfully under the co-existence test plan. However, this is not an FCC requirement and similar to conformity testing for private sector standards the co-existence test results are not included in the FCC’s equipment certification records."

ComputerWorld explained in 2015 the strain on existing wireless capabilities and why several technology companies pursued the technology:

"According to the wireless providers and Qualcomm, the technology will make use of the existing unlicensed spectrum most commonly used for Wi-Fi. LTE-U is designed to deliver a similar capability as Wi-Fi, namely short-range connectivity to mobile devices.

As billions of mobile devices and Web video continue to strain wireless networks and existing spectrum allocations, the mobile ecosphere is looking for good sources of spectrum. The crunch is significant, and tangible solutions take a long time to develop... as former FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell recently remarked, “mobile data traffic in the U.S. will grow sevenfold between 2014 and 2019” while “wearable and connected devices in the U.S. will double” in that same period."

Some cable companies, such as Comcast, opposed LTE-U based upon concerns about the technology conflicting with existing home WiFi. According to Computerworld:

"In real-world tests so far, LTE-U delivers better performance than Wi-Fi, doesn’t degrade nearby Wi-Fi performance and may in fact improve the performance of nearby Wi-Fi networks."

Reportedly, in August 2016 Verizon viewed the testing as "fundamentally unfair and biased." Ajit Pai, the new FCC Chairman, said in a statement on Wednesday:

"LTE-U allows wireless providers to deliver mobile data traffic using unlicensed spectrum while sharing the road, so to speak, with Wi-Fi. The excellent staff of the FCC’s Office of Engineering and Technology has certified that the LTE-U devices being approved today are in compliance with FCC rules. And voluntary industry testing has demonstrated that both these devices and Wi-Fi operations can co-exist in the 5 GHz band. This heralds a technical breakthrough in the many shared uses of this spectrum.

This is a great deal for wireless consumers, too. It means they get to enjoy the best of both worlds: a more robust, seamless experience when their devices are using cellular networks and the continued enjoyment of Wi-Fi, one of the most creative uses of spectrum in history..."


Your Smart TV Is A Blabbermouth. How To Stop Its Spying On You

Internet-connected televisions, often referred to as "smart TVs," collect a wide variety of information about consumers. The devices track the videos you watch from several sources: cable, broadband, set-top box, DVD player, over-the-air broadcasts, and streaming devices. The devices collect a wide variety of information about consumers, including items such as as sex, age, income, marital status, household size, education level, home ownership, and household value. The TV makers sell this information to third parties, such as advertisers and data brokers.

Some people might call this "surveillance capitalism."

Reliability and trust with smart devices are critical for consumers. Earlier this month, Vizio agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle privacy abuse charges by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

What's a consumer to do to protect their privacy? This C/Net article provides good step-by-step instructions to turn off or to minimize the tracking by your smart television. The instructions include several smart TV brands: Samsung, Vizio, LG, Sony, and others. Sample instructions for one brand:

"Samsung: On 2016 TVs, click the remote's Home button, go to Settings (gear icon), scroll down to Support, then down to Terms & Policy. Under "Interest Based Advertisement" click "Disable Interactive Services." Under "Viewing Information Services" unclick "I agree." And under "Voice Recognition Services" click "Disable advanced features of the Voice Recognition services." If you want you can also disagree with the other two, Nuance Voice Recognition and Online Remote Management.

On older Samsung TVs, hit the remote's Menu button (on 2015 models only, then select Menu from the top row of icons), scroll down to Smart Hub, then select Terms & Policy. Disable "SynchPlus and Marketing." You can also disagree with any of the other policies listed there, and if your TV has them, disable the voice recognition and disagree with the Nuance privacy notice described above."

Browse the step-by-step instructions for your brand of television. If you disabled the tracking features on your smart TV, how did it go? If you used a different resource to learn about your smart TV's tracking features, please share it below.


EU Privacy Watchdogs Ask Microsoft For Explanations About Data Collection About Users

A privacy watchdog group in the European Union (EU) are concerned about privacy and data collection practices by Microsoft. The group, comprising 28 agencies and referred to as the Article 29 Working Party, sent a letter to Microsoft asking for explanations about privacy concerns with the software company's Windows 10 operating system software.

The February 2017 letter to Brendon Lynch, Chief Privacy Officer, and to Satya Nadella, Chief Executive Officer, was a follow-up to a prior letter sent in January. The February letter explained:

"Following the launch of Windows 10, a new version of the Windows operating system, a number of concerns have been raised, in the media and in signals from concerned citizens to the data protection authorities, regarding protection of your users’ personal data... the Working Party expressed significant concerns about the default installation settings and an apparent lack of control for a user to prevent collection or further processing of data, as well as concerns about the scope of data that are being collected and further processed... "

Microsoft logo While Microsoft has been cooperative so far, the group's specific privacy concerns:

"... user consent can only be valid if fully informed, freely given and specific. Whilst it is clear that the proposed new express installation screen will present users with five options to limit or switch off certain kinds of data processing it is not clear to what extent both new and existing users will be informed about the specific data that are being collected and processed under each of the functionalities. The proposed new explanation when, for example, a user switches the level of telemetry data from 'full' to 'basic' that Microsoft will collect 'less data' is insufficient without further explanation. Such information currently is also not available in the current version of the privacy policy.

Additionally, the purposes for which Microsoft collects personal data have to be specified, explicit and legitimate, and the data may not be further processed in a way incompatible with those purposes. Microsoft processes data collected through Windows 10 for different purposes, including personalised advertising. Microsoft should clearly explain what kinds of personal data are processed for what purposes. Without such information, consent cannot be informed, and therefore, not valid..."

Visit this EU link for more information about the Article 29 Working Party, or download the Article 29 Working Party letter to Microsoft (Adobe PDF).


Are Smart Television Makers Gaming The Energy-Efficiency Tests?

After yesterday's blog post about the settlement agreement by VIZIO with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the New Jersey Attorney General, a reader mentioned an Economist article about smart televisions. It seems there is an ongoing investigation into whether or not manufacturers, similar to the Volkswagon emissions scandal, misrepresented the energy-efficiency test results of their televisions.

The Economist reported:

"South Korea’s Samsung and LG, along with Vizio, a Californian firm, stand accused of misrepresenting the energy efficiency of large-screen sets. Together, they sell over half of all TVs in America. In September 2016 the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), an environmental group, published research on the energy consumption of TVs, showing that those made by Samsung, LG and Vizio performed far better during short government tests than they did the rest of the time. Some TVs consumed double the amount of energy suggested by manufacturers’ marketing bumpf. America’s Department of Energy (DoE) has also conducted tests of its own that have turned up big inconsistencies.

Not all TV-makers are at fault: the NRDC found no difference in energy-consumption levels for TVs made by Sony and Philips. But class-action lawsuits have already been filed against the three companies highlighted by the tests—the latest was lodged against Samsung in New York on January 30th. The industry is now waiting to see whether regulators will take action... Televisions made by Samsung and LG (but not Vizio) appear to recognize the test clip that the American government uses to rate energy consumption and to advise consumers on how much it will cost to operate the set over a whole year. The DoE’s ten-minute test clip has a lot of motion and scene changes in short succession, with each clip lasting only 2.3 seconds before flashing to a new one (most TV content is made up of scenes that last more than double that length). During these tests the TVs’ backlight dims, resulting in substantial energy savings. For the rest of the time, during typical viewing conditions, the backlight stays bright..."

If true, then those new televisions many consumers bought may cost them a lot more energy and electricity costs. The September 2016 NRDC press release:

"There are flaws in the government’s method for testing the energy use of televisions and three major TV manufacturers representing half of the U.S. market appear to be exploiting them, which could cost owners of recently purchased models an extra $1.2 billion on their utility bills... The global standard video clip on which the DOE test method is based is eight years old and needs a major overhaul. DOE should update its test method with more realistic video content... It appears that some major manufacturers have modified their TV designs to get strong energy-use marks during government testing but they may not perform as well in consumers’ homes. These ‘under the hood’ changes dramatically increase a TV’s energy use and environmental impact, usually without the user’s knowledge. While this may not be illegal, it smacks of bad-faith conduct that falls outside the intent of the government test method designed to accurately measure TV energy use..."

The consequences and impacts go far beyond possible bad-faith conduct:

"The latest version of ultra high-definition (UHD) TVs used approximately 30 to 50 percent more energy when playing content produced with High Dynamic Range (HDR) than conventional UHD content... With millions of televisions purchased annually across America, all of this extra energy use has a major impact on national energy consumption, consumer utility bills, and the environment..."

You can learn more about the DoE test procedures here. What are your opinions of this?


VIZIO To Pay $2.2 Million To Settle Privacy Charges About Its Smart TVs

VIZIO Inc. logo Today's blog post highlights how easy it is for manufacturers to make and sell smart-home devices that spy on consumers without notice nor consent. VIZIO, Inc., one of the largest makers of smart televisions, agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle privacy abuse charges by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the State of New Jersey Attorney General. The FTC announcement explained:

"... starting in February 2014, VIZIO, Inc. and an affiliated company have manufactured VIZIO smart TVs that capture second-by-second information about video displayed on the smart TV, including video from consumer cable, broadband, set-top box, DVD, over-the-air broadcasts, and streaming devices. In addition, VIZIO facilitated appending specific demographic information to the viewing data, such as sex, age, income, marital status, household size, education level, home ownership, and household value... VIZIO sold this information to third parties, who used it for various purposes, including targeting advertising to consumers across devices... VIZIO touted its “Smart Interactivity” feature that “enables program offers and suggestions” but failed to inform consumers that the settings also enabled the collection of consumers’ viewing data. The complaint alleges that VIZIO’s data tracking—which occurred without viewers’ informed consent—was unfair and deceptive, in violation of the FTC Act and New Jersey consumer protection laws."

The FTC complaint (Adobe PDF) named as defendants VIZIO, Inc. and VIZIO Inscape Services, LLC, its wholly-owned subsidiary. VIZIO has designed and sold televisions in the United States since 2002, and has sold more than 11 million Internet-connected televisions since 2010. The complaint also mentioned:

"... the successor entity to Cognitive Media Services, Inc., which developed proprietary automated content recognition (“ACR”) software to detect the content on internet-connected televisions and monitors."

This merits emphasis because consumers thinking that they can watch DVD or locally recorded content in the privacy of their home with advertisers knowing it really can't because the ACR software can easily identify, archive, and transmit it. The complaint also explained:

"Through the ACR software, VIZIO’s televisions transmit information about what a consumer is watching on a second-by-second basis. Defendants’ ACR software captures information about a selection of pixels on the screen and sends that data to VIZIO servers, where it is uniquely matched to a database of publicly available television, movie, and commercial content. Defendants collect viewing data from cable or broadband service providers, set-top boxes, external streaming devices, DVD players, and over-the-air broadcasts... the ACR software captures up to 100 billion data points each day from more than 10 million VIZIO televisions. Defendants store this data indefinitely. Defendants’ ACR software also periodically collects other information about the television, including IP address, wired and wireless MAC addresses, WiFi signal strength, nearby WiFi access points, and other items."

That's impressive. The ACR software enabled VIZIO to know and collect information about other devices (e.g., computers, tablets, phones, printers) connected to your home WiFi network. Then, besides the money consumers paid for their VIZIO smart TVs, the company also made money by reselling the information it collected to third parties... probably data brokers and advertisers. You'd think that the company might lower the price of its smart TVs given that additional revenue stream, but I guess not.

Now, here is where VIZIO created problems for itself:

"Consumers that purchased new VIZIO televisions beginning in August 2014, with ACR tracking preinstalled and enabled by default, received no onscreen notice of the collection of viewing data. For televisions that were updated in February 2014 to install default ACR tracking after purchase, an initial pop-up notification appeared on the screen that said: "The VIZIO Privacy Policy has changed. Smart Interactivity has been enabled on your TV, but you may disable it in the settings menu. See www.vizio.com/privacy for more details. This message will time out in 1 minute." This notification provided no information about the collection of viewing data or ACR software. Nor did it directly link to the settings menu or privacy policy... In March 2016, while Plaintiffs’ investigations were pending, [VIZIO and VIZIO Inscape] sent another pop-up notification to televisions that, for the first time, referenced the collection of television viewing data. This notification timed out after 30 seconds without input from the household member who happened to be viewing the screen at the time, and did not provide easy access to the settings menu... In all televisions enabled with ACR tracking, VIZIO televisions had a setting, available through the settings menu, called “Smart Interactivity.” This setting included the description: “Enables program offers and suggestions.” Similarly, in the manual for some VIZIO televisions, a section entitled “Smart Interactivity” described the practice as “Your TV can display program-related information as part of the broadcast.” Neither description provided information about the collection of viewing data..."

30 seconds? Really?! If a consumer left the room to grab a bite to eat or visit the bathroom for a bio break, they easily missed this pop-up message. No notice? Neither are good. VIZIO released a statement about the settlement:

"VIZIO is pleased to reach this resolution with the FTC and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs.  Going forward, this resolution sets a new standard for best industry privacy practices for the collection and analysis of data collected from today’s internet-connected televisions and other home devices,” stated Jerry Huang, VIZIO General Counsel. “The ACR program never paired viewing data with personally identifiable information such as name or contact information, and the Commission did not allege or contend otherwise. Instead, as the Complaint notes, the practices challenged by the government related only to the use of viewing data in the ‘aggregate’ to create summary reports measuring viewing audiences or behaviors... the FTC has made clear that all smart TV makers should get people’s consent before collecting and sharing television viewing information and VIZIO now is leading the way,” concluded Huang."

Terms of the settlement agreement and the Court Order (Adobe PDF) require VIZIO to:

"A. Prominently disclose to the consumer, separate and apart from any “privacy policy,” “terms of use” page, or other similar document: (1) the types of Viewing Data that will be collected and used, (2) the types of Viewing Data that will be shared with third parties; (3) the identity or specific categories of such third parties; and (4) all purposes for Defendants’ sharing of such information;

B. Obtain the consumer’s affirmative express consent (1) at the time the disclosure...

C. Provide instructions, at any time the consumer’s affirmative express consent is sought under Part II.B, for how the consumer may revoke consent to collection of Viewing Data.

D. For the purposes of this Order, “Prominently” means that a required disclosure is difficult to miss (i.e., easily noticeable) and easily understandable by ordinary consumers..."

The Order also defines that disclosure must be visual, audible, in all formats which VIZIO uses, in easy-to-understand language, and not contradicted by any legal statements elsewhere. Terms of the settlement require VIZIO to pay $1.5 million to the FTC, $1.0 million to the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs (which includes a $915,940.00 civil penalty and $84,060.00 for attorneys’ fees and investigative costs). VIZIO will not have to pay $300,000 due to the N.j> Division of consumer affairs it the company complies with court order, and does not engage in acts that violate the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act (CFA) during the next five years.

Additional terms of the settlement agreement require VIZIO to destroy information collected before March 1, 2016, establish and implement a privacy program, designate one or several employees responsible for that program, identify and risks of internal processes that cause the company to collect consumer information it shouldn't, design and implement a program to address those risks, develop and implement processes to identify service providers that will comply with the privacy program, and hire an independent third-party to audit the privacy program every two years.

I guess the FTC and New Jersey AG felt this level of specificity was necessary given VIZIO's past behaviors. Kudos to the FTC and to the New Jersey AG for enforcing and protecting consumers' privacy. Given the rapid pace of technological change and the complexity of today's devices, oversight is required. Consumers simply don't have the skills nor resources to do these types of investigations.

What are your opinions of the VIZIO settlement?


74 Percent of US Broadband Households Have Internet-Connected Televisions

According to new research from The Diffusion Group (TDG), 74 percent of US households had Internet-connected televisions at year-end 2016. In 2013, 50 percent of households had Internet-connected televisions. Michael Greeson, TDG President and Director of Research, said:

"At 74% penetration, connected TV use is squarely in the Late Mainstream phase of its trajectory. Barring any major disruption in TV technology or market conditions, growth will slow each year as the solution reaches saturation... Broadband pay-TV services are particularly well positioned to leverage this utility, which permits scale at much lower costs."

TDG first noted in 2004 that the penetration of connected televisions would closely follow broadband (a/k/a high-speed Internet) services.

Chart by TDG of Internet-connected televisions in the United States. Click to view larger version


FTC Lawsuit Claims D-Link Products Have Inadequate Security

Do you use D-Link modem/routers or routers? Do you have or plan to buy smart home appliances or electronics (a/k/a the Internet of Things or IoT) you want to connect via your home WiFi network to these or other brand routers? Are you concerned about the security of IoT devices? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then today's blog post is for you.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed a complaint against Taiwan-based D-Link Corporation and its U.S. subsidiary alleging the tech company didn't do enough to make its products secure from hacking. The FTC announcement stated that its complaint alleged:

"... that D-Link failed to take reasonable steps to secure its routers and Internet Protocol (IP) cameras, potentially compromising sensitive consumer information, including live video and audio feeds from D-Link IP cameras... D-Link promoted the security of its routers on the company’s website, which included materials headlined “EASY TO SECURE” and “ADVANCED NETWORK SECURITY.” But despite the claims made by D-Link, the FTC alleged, the company failed to take steps to address well-known and easily preventable security flaws, such as: a) "hard-coded" login credentials integrated into D-Link camera software -- such as the username “guest” and the password “guest” -- that could allow unauthorized access to the cameras’ live feed; b) a software flaw known as “command injection” that could enable remote attackers to take control of consumers’ routers by sending them unauthorized commands over the Internet; c) the mishandling of a private key code used to sign into D-Link software, such that it was openly available on a public website for six months; and d) leaving users’ login credentials for D-Link’s mobile app unsecured in clear, readable text on their mobile devices, even though there is free software available to secure the information."

Besides the D-Link shopping site, the company's products are available at many online stores, including Best Buy, Target, Walmart, and Amazon. The FTC complaint (Adobe PDF) stated 5 Counts describing in detail the alleged security lapses, some of  which allegedly contradict advertising claims. The redacted complaint did not list specific product model numbers. Apple Insider reported:

"The security lapses also extended to mobile apps offered by D-Link to access and manage IP cameras and routers from a smartphone or tablet."

If these allegations are true, then item "C" is troubling. it raises questions about how and why a private key code were available on a public, unprotected server and for so long. It raises questions why this information wasn't encrypted. Access codes on a public server may help government intelligence agencies perform their tasks, but it suggests insufficient security for consumers. Access codes and login credentials are the holy grail for criminals. This is the information they seek in order to hack accounts and hijack devices.

Consumers connect via home routers a variety of IoT or smart devices: security systems, cameras, baby monitors, thermostats, home electronics, home appliances, toys, lawn mowers, and more. If true, the vulnerabilities could allow criminals to case home furnishings, eavesdrop on conversations, watch residents' patterns and discover when they are away from home, disable security systems, access tax and financial records, redirect users' Internet usage to fraudulent sites, and more.

The risks are real. A prior blog post discussed some of the security issues with IoT devices. Home routers have been hijacked and used to shut down targeted sites. ZDNet warned in May 2015:

"According to a report released by cybersecurity firm Incapsula on Wednesday, lax security practices concerning small office and home office (SOHO) routers has resulted in tens of thousands of routers becoming hijacked -- ending up as slave systems in the botnet network. Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are a common way to disrupt networks and online services. The networks are often made up of compromised PCs, routers and other devices. Attackers control the botnet through a command and control center (C&C) in order to flood specific domains with traffic... ISPs, vendors and users themselves -- who do not lay down basic security foundations such as changing default passwords and keeping networks locked -- have likely caused the slavery of "hundreds of thousands [...] more likely millions" of routers now powering DDoS botnets which can cause havoc for both businesses and consumers..."

And a December 7, 2016 report by Incapsula listed about 18 vendors, including D-Link, that were susceptible to the Mirai malware used by botnets. So, the threat is real. Home routers have already been hijacked by bad guys to attack sites.

D-Link posted on its site a response to the FTC complaint:

"D-Link Systems, Inc. will vigorously defend itself against the unwarranted and baseless charges made by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)... D-Link Systems maintains a robust range of procedures to address potential security issues, which exist in all Internet of Things (IOT) devices. Notably, the complaint does not allege any breach of a D-Link Systems device. Instead, the FTC speculates that consumers were placed “at risk” to be hacked, but fails to allege, as it must, that actual consumers suffered or are likely to suffer actual substantial injuries."

That response raises more questions. Breaches involve unauthorized persons accessing computers and/or networks. Clearly, botnets are collections of hijacked devices controlled by unauthorized persons using malware. The Incapsula reports clearly documented this. So, how are hijacked home routers and IoT devices with malware not breaches? And, botnets are designed to attack targeted sites, and not necessarily the hijacked routers and devices. So, the "actual substantial injuries" argument falls apart.

Aware consumers don't want their smart televisions, refrigerators, dishwashers, home security systems, baby monitors, cameras, and other devices hijacked by bad guys. The whole situation seems to provide two important reminders for consumers: 1) protect your IoT devices, and 2) be informed shoppers.

Protecting your IoT devices means changing the default passwords, especially on your routers and disabling remote access features. Informed shoppers Inquire before purchase about software security updates for IoT devices. Are those updates included in the product price, available in a separate subscription, or not at all? There are plenty of examples of smart home products with vulnerabilities and questionable security. Informed shoppers know before purchase.

If the product offers a separate subscription for software security updates, the money spent will be well worth it to protect your sensitive personal and financial information, to protect your family's privacy, and to avoid hijacked devices. If the product lacks software security updates, you want to know what you're buying and maybe barter for a lower price. Me? I'd keep shopping for alternatives with better security.

Protect your WiFi-connected home electronics, devices, and appliances. Don't contribute to Internet security problems.

Since most consumers lack the technical expertise to understand and detect breaches on their IoT devices, I am grateful for the FTC enforcement action; and for its guidelines in 2015 for companies offering IoT devices. Plus, the FTC is concerned with industry-wide threats that could hamper commerce. Perhaps, an economist can calculate the negative impacts upon commerce, the U.S. economy, and GDP from botnet attacks.

What are your opinions of the FTC lawsuit against D-Link Corporation? Of the security of IoT devices?


Win $25K In The FTC Internet-Of-Things Home Inspector Challenge

For the holidays, many consumers gave or received devices for their homes that are WiFi-connected, often referred to as the "Internet of Things" (IoT). Those devices include Internet routers, security cameras, home security systems, and a variety of appliances and electronics: televisions, refrigerators, clothes washers, lighting, heating/cooling systems, toys, DVRs, and more. Residences outfitted with these devices are often referred to as "Smart Homes" or "Connected Homes."

Experts forecast 50 billion devices globally by 2020. Plus, utilities have already installed smart meters in homes that regularly transmit consumers' water/oil/gas usage to their utility providers. Protecting those devices against hackers is critical.

U.S. Federal Trade Commission logo While the FTC has published guidelines for manufacturers of IOT devices, those guidelines aren't mandatory. The privacy threats of IoT devices are known, and researchers have warned about the vulnerabilities in specific products.

To help consumers manage their WiFi-connected home devices, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a prize competition called the "IoT Home Inspector Challenge." The FTC will award the $25,000 top prize to the solution that best helps consumers protect their IoT devices against vulnerabilities and to manage passwords (e.g., replace factory-defaults) for all home devices. Up to three honorable mention prizes of $3,000 each area also available.

Consumers working individually, or in teams, can register and submit entries beginning March 1, 2017. The deadline for entries is May 22, 2017. Winners will be announced on July 27, 2017. To be considered, entries must meet the following criteria:

  • Provide a technical solution, rather than a policy or legal solution
  • Work on home IoT devices that currently exist on the market
  • Protect information it collects both in transit and at rest,
  • Explain how the tool or solution will avoid or mitigate any additional security risks that the tool itself might introduce into the consumer’s home by (example, software upgrades)

The judges will rate each entry based upon how well it addresses the following four components:

  1. Recognize what IoT devices are operating in the consumer’s home. This may be automatic or provide instructions for consumer input,
  2. Determine what software version is already on those IoT devices. Again, this may be automatic or provide instructions for consumer input,
  3. Determine the latest software version each home IoT device should have, and
  4. Assist with updates.

Visit the FTC IoT Home Inspector Challenge site for complete details about the competition, including contest rules, judges, FAQs, and the registration/submission process.