113 posts categorized "Surveys" Feed

Poll Finds Republicans Rollback of Broadband Privacy Very Unpopular

A recent poll found that the Republican rollback of broadband privacy rules is very unpopular. Very unpopular. The poll included 1,000 Americans, and the results cut across age, gender, and political affiliations. Despite this, President Trump signed the privacy-rollback legislation on April 3. Since then, many consumers have sought online tools to protect their privacy.

Vox reported the survey results:

Image of Yougov poll results about Republican rollback of broadband privacy. Click to view larger version

Late last week, several Republicans in the House of Representatives sent a letter (Adobe PDF) to Ajit Pai, the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), urging the FCC to regulate broadband service providers. The letter read, in part:

"We write to ensure that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) stands ready to protect consumer privacy... The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has long been the standard bearer for striking the right balance of consumer protection with a pro-innovative construct that encourages consumer choice, opportunities, and new jobs... An FCC approach that mirrors the FTC will continue to protect consumers in this tumultuous time... Until such time as the FCC rectifies the Title II reclassification that inappropriately removed ISPs from the FTC's jurisdiction, we urge the FCC to hold Internet service providers (ISPs) to their privacy promises..."

The letter was signed by Greg Walden (Chairman, Committee on Energy & Commerce), Marsha Blackburn (Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications & Technology), and 48 other representatives.

Tumultuous times? The tumult was created by the rollback of privacy rules -- a situation created by Republicans. All would have been fine if they'd left the FCC's broadband privacy rules in place; rules consumers clear want -- rules that keep users in control of their online privacy.

Representative Blackburn and her fellow Republicans either doesn't know history or have chosen to ignore it. Several problems have plagued the industry: a lack of ISP competition in key markets, consumers in the United States pay more for broadband and get slower speeds compared to other countries, and numerous privacy violations and lawsuits:

Clearly, the FCC had to act, it did, it held hearings, and then finalized improved broadband privacy rules to help consumers. Now, the Congress and President undid all of that creating the tumult they now claim to want to solve.

Clearly, Representative Blackburn and others are happy to comply with the wishes of their corporate donors -- who don't want broadband classified as a utility. Internet access is a basic consumer need for work, entertainment, and school -- just like water, electricity, and natural gas (for cooking). Internet access is a utility, like it or not. The FCC under Chairman Wheeler had the right consumer-friendly approach, despite the spin by Blackburn and others.

What are your opinions?


Study: Many Consumers Don't Secure Their Mobile Devices

Many consumers in the United States don't take the steps experts recommend to secure their mobile devices. Pew Research reported the findings of a recent survey:

"More than a quarter (28%) of smartphone owners say they do not use a screen lock or other security features to access their phone. And while a majority of smartphone users say they have updated their phone’s apps or operating system, about 40% say they only update when it’s convenient for them. Meanwhile, some users forgo updating their phones altogether: Around one-in-ten  smartphone owners report they never update their phone’s operating system (14%) or update the apps on their phone (10%)."

And, there are differences by the age of phone owners:

"owners ages 65 and older are much less likely than adults younger than 65 to use a screen lock and regularly update their phone’s apps and operating system (13% vs. 23%). Smartphone users 65 and older are also more than twice as likely as younger users to report that they do not take any of these actions to secure their phones (8% vs. 3%)..."

Other risky behaviors consumers perform:

"... 54% of internet users use public Wi-Fi networks, and many of these users are performing sensitive activities such online shopping (21%) or online banking (20%)."


Survey: Internet of Evil Things Report

Pwnie 2017 Internet of Evil Things report A recent survey of information technology (IT) professionals by Pwnie Express, an information security vendor, found that connected devices bring risks into corporate networks and IT professionals are not keeping up. 90 percent of IT professionals surveyed view connected devices as a security threat to their corporate systems and networks. 66 percent aren't sure how many connected devices are in their organizations.

These findings have huge implications as the installed base of connected devices (a/k/a the "Internet of things" or ioT) takes off. Experts forecast 8.4 billion connected devices in use worldwide in 2017, up 31 percent from 2016. Total spending for those devices will reach almost $2 trillion in 2017, and $20.4 billion by 2020. The regions that will drive this growth include North America, Western Europe, and China; which already comprise 67 percent of the installed base.

Key results from the latest survey by Pwnie Express:

"One in five of the survey respondents (20%) said their IoT devices were hit with ransomware attacks last year. 16 percent of respondents say they experienced Man-in-the-middle attacks through IoT devices. Devices continue to lend themselves to problematic configurations. The default network from common routers “linksys” and “Netgear” were two of the top 10 most common “open default” wireless SSID’s (named networks), and the hotspot network built-in for the configuration and setup of HP printers - “hpsetup”- is #2."

An SSID, or Service Set Identifier, is the name a wireless network broadcasts. Manufacturers ship them with default names, which the bad guys often look for to find open, unprotected networks. While businesses purchase and deploy a variety of connected devices (e.g., smart meters, manufacturing field devices, process sensors for electrical generating plants, real-time location devices for healthcare) and some for "smart buildings" (e.g., LED lighting, HVAC sensors, security systems), other devices are brought into the workplace by workers.

Most companies have Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies allowing employees to bring and use in the workplace personal devices (e.g., phones, tablets, smart watches, fitness bands). The risk for corporate IT professionals is that when employees, contractors, and consultants bring their personal devices into the workplace, and connect to corporate networks. A mobile device infected with malware from a wireless home network, or from a public hot-spot (e.g., airport, restaurant) can easily introduce that malware into office networks.

Consumers connect a wide variety of items to their wireless home networks: laptops, tablets, smartphones, printers, lighting and temperature controls, televisions, home security systems, fitness bands, smart watches, toys, smart wine bottles, and home appliances (e.g., refrigerators, hot water heaters, coffee makers, crock pots, etc.). Devices with poor security features don't allow operating system and security software updates, don't encrypt key information such as PIN numbers and passwords, and build the software into the firmware where it cannot be upgraded. Last month, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) filed a lawsuit against a modem/router maker alleging poor security in its products.

Security experts advise consumers to perform several steps to protect their wireless home networks: change the SSID name, change all default passwords, enable encryption (e.g., WEP, WPA, WPA2, etc.), create a special password for guests, and enable a firewall. While security experts have warned consumers for years, too many still don't heed the advice.

The survey respondents identified the top connected device threats:

"1. Misconfigured healthcare, security, and IoT devices will provide another route for ransomware and malware to cause harm and affect organizations.

2. Unresolved vulnerabilities or the misconfiguration of popular connected devices, spurred by the vulnerabilities being publicized by botnets, including Mirai and newer, “improved” versions, in the hands of rogue actors will compromise the security of organizations purchasing these devices.

3. Mobile phones will be the attack vector of the future, becoming an extra attack surface and another mode of rogue access points taking advantage of unencrypted Netgear, AT&T, and hpsetup wireless networks to set up man-in-the-middle attacks."

The survey included more than 800 IT security professionals in several industries: financial services, hospitality, retail, manufacturing, professional services, technology, healthcare, energy and more. Download the "2017 Internet of Evil Things Report" by Pwnie.


74 Percent of US Broadband Households Have Internet-Connected Televisions

According to new research from The Diffusion Group (TDG), 74 percent of US households had Internet-connected televisions at year-end 2016. In 2013, 50 percent of households had Internet-connected televisions. Michael Greeson, TDG President and Director of Research, said:

"At 74% penetration, connected TV use is squarely in the Late Mainstream phase of its trajectory. Barring any major disruption in TV technology or market conditions, growth will slow each year as the solution reaches saturation... Broadband pay-TV services are particularly well positioned to leverage this utility, which permits scale at much lower costs."

TDG first noted in 2004 that the penetration of connected televisions would closely follow broadband (a/k/a high-speed Internet) services.

Chart by TDG of Internet-connected televisions in the United States. Click to view larger version


Federal Reserve Survey of Experiences of Younger Workers

The Federal Reserve Board (FRB) recently released the results of its survey of younger workers ages 18 to 30 with data through 2015. The survey found that younger workers overall:

"... experienced higher rates of unemployment and lower rates of labor force participation than the general population for at least two decades, and the Great Recession exacerbated this phenomenon. Despite a substantial labor market recovery from 2009 through 2014, vulnerable populations—including the nation’s young adults—continue to experience higher rates of unemployment. Changes in labor market conditions, including globalization and automation, have reduced the availability of well-paid, secure jobs for less-educated persons, particularly those jobs that provide opportunity for advancement. Furthermore, data suggest that young workers entering the labor market are affected by a long-running increase in the use of “contingent” or “alternative” work arrangements, characterized by contracted, part-time, temporary, and seasonal work."

Specific findings about younger workers' attitudes:

"In 2015, the majority of young adults (61 percent) are optimistic about their future job opportunities, showing an increase in optimism from 2013 (45 percent)... the likelihood that a young adult is optimistic about future job opportunities increases with higher levels of education... young adults continue to have a strong preference for steady employment (62 percent) over higher pay (36 percent)... Among respondents who prefer steady employment, 80 percent would rather have one steady job than a stream of steady jobs for the next five years...

Most young adults are not sure how their standard of living will compare with their parents’ standard of living. Young adults with at least one parent with a bachelor’s degree (or higher) are more likely to believe their standard of living will be lower than their parents (4 percent) when compared with young adults whose parents have a high school education or less (1 percent)...

Specific findings about younger workers' experiences:

"28 percent of respondents are currently enrolled as students in a certificate or degree program. Most students are enrolled in degree programs... most undergraduate students are identified “nontraditional” because they are over age 23, enrolled in school part time, working full time, and/or financially independent. 10 percent of respondents are “non-completers,” meaning they are not currently enrolled in a certificate or degree program they started... 62 percent of respondents with post-secondary education worked while in school to finance all or part of their most recent education. 52 percent of respondents with post-secondary educational experience have parents that contributed financially to their education. 46 percent of respondents incurred debt to pay for some portion of their education or training...

41 percent of respondents believe they have the level of education and training needed for the type of job that they would like to hold in the next five years... 66 percent of young adults received information about jobs and careers during high school. And, 69 percent of young adults received such information in college...

Less than half (45 percent) of employees work in a career field that is closely related to their educational and training background... Many young adults gained early work experience during high school, college, or both. 53 percent of young adults had a paid job during high school, and 77 percent of young adults had a paid job during college..."

A key takeaway: about 30 percent of young adults did not receive information about jobs and careers in high school nor college. That seems to be an area the educational sector must improve upon.

4,135 potential respondents were contacted for the 2015 survey, and 2,035 completed surveys (49 percent response rate). FRB staff designed the survey, which was administered by GfK, an online consumer research company.

More notable statistics from the survey: about 69 percent of survey respondents have some form of paid employment, up from 60 percent in 2013. 63 percent of employees held a single full-time job during the past year, and 18 percent of employees held multiple full-time jobs during the past year. Profile information about employed younger workers:

"78 percent of employees have a permanent/long-term job... 75 percent of employees in the survey have a full-time job... Among part-time employees surveyed, 49 percent were identified as underemployed, as they are working part time because of economic conditions. Meanwhile, 42 percent of part-time employees prefer part-time work... The percent of young workers who have health insurance increased from 2013 (70 percent) to 2015 (82 percent). Likewise, the percent of young workers who received paid time off for sick leave, holidays, or both from any of their paid jobs increased from 2013 (59 percent) to 2015 (62 percent)...

As adults, 43 percent of employees have formed a new household with their immediate family (i.e., spouse/partner), and 20 percent have formed a new household alone or with a roommate..."

Self-sufficiency is important. The report found:

"... 73 percent of employees are able to cover their monthly household expenses with their household income. Meanwhile, 22 percent of employees report that they are sometimes able to cover their monthly household expenses, and 4 percent are not able to cover their monthly household expenses at all... Among employees who are not able to cover their household expenses some or all of the time, 64 percent reduce their monthly expenses to meet the challenge, 56 percent do not pay some bills, 54 percent borrow money from family, 46 percent use their credit cards, 41 percent use savings, and 16 percent borrow from friends.

A key consideration regarding self-sufficiency is the ability of a household to withstand financial disruptions. Among young workers, the ability to go without a paycheck temporarily improved between 2013 and 2015. The percent of young workers who can pay their living expenses if out of work for four weeks improved from 38 percent in 2013 to 45 percent in 2015..."

The report cited 4 policy implications to address the findings:

  1. Improve Alignment between Education and the Labor Market
  2. Increase Opportunities for Non-degree Education
  3. Provide Assistance and Protections for Workers with Alternative Work Arrangements
  4. Seek Opportunities to Improve Job Growth

There is plenty of information in the 120-page report, which is available at the FRB site and here (Adobe PDF; 1,190.2K bytes).


How To Spot Fake News And Not Get Duped

You may have heard about the "pizzagate" conspiracy -- fake news about a supposed child-sex ring operating from a pizzeria in Washington, DC. A heavily armed citizen drove from North Carolina to the pizzeria to investigate to investigate the bogus child-sex ring supposedly run by Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. The reality: no sex ring. That citizen had been duped by fake news. Shots were fired, and thankfully nobody was hurt.

CBS News reported that the pizzagate conspiracy had been promoted by Michael G. Flynn, son of retired General Michael T. Flynn, Donald Trump's pick for national security adviser. As a result, the younger Flynn resigned Tuesday from President-Elect Trump's transition team.

I use the phrase "fake news" for several types of misleading content: propaganda, unproven or fact-free conspiracy theories, disinformation, and clickbait. The pizzagate incident highlighted two issues: a) fake news has consequences, and b) many people don't know how to distinguish real news from fake news. So, while political operatives reportedly have used a combination of fake news, ads, and social media to both encourage supporters to vote and discourage opponents from voting, there clearly are other real-life consequences.

To help people spot fake news, NPR reported:

"Stopping the proliferation of fake news isn't just the responsibility of the platforms used to spread it. Those who consume news also need to find ways of determining if what they're reading is true. We offer several tips below. The idea is that people should have a fundamental sense of media literacy. And based on a study recently released by Stanford University researchers, many people don't."

The report is enlightening. In the "Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning" report, researchers at Stanford University tested about 7,804 students in 12 states between January 2015 and June 2016. They found:

"... at each level—middle school, high school, and college—these variations paled in comparison to a stunning and dismaying consistency. Overall, young people’s ability to reason about the information on the Internet can be summed up in one word: bleak. Our “digital natives” may be able to flit between Facebook and Twitter while simultaneously uploading a selfie to Instagram and texting a friend. But when it comes to evaluating information that flows through social media channels, they are easily duped... We would hope that middle school students could distinguish an ad from a news story. By high school, we would hope that students reading about gun laws would notice that a chart came from a gun owners’ political action committee. And, in 2016, we would hope college students, who spend hours each day online, would look beyond a .org URL and ask who’s behind a site that presents only one side of a contentious issue. But in every case and at every level, we were taken aback by students’ lack of preparation... Many [people] assume that because young people are fluent in social media they are equally savvy about what they find there. Our work shows the opposite."

This is important for both individuals and the future of the nation because:

"For every challenge facing this nation, there are scores of websites pretending to be something they are not. Ordinary people once relied on publishers, editors, and subject matter experts to vet the information they consumed. But on the unregulated Internet, all bets are off... Never have we had so much information at our fingertips. Whether this bounty will make us smarter and better informed or more ignorant and narrow-minded will depend on our awareness of this problem and our educational response to it. At present, we worry that democracy is threatened by the ease at which disinformation about civic issues is allowed to spread and flourish."

While the study focused upon students, but older persons have been duped, too. The suspect in the pizzeria incident was 28 years old. The Stanford report focused upon what teachers and educators can do to better prepare students. According to the researchers, additional solutions are forthcoming.

What can you do to spot fake news? Don't wait for sites and/or social media to do it for you. Become a smarter consumer. The NPR report suggested:

  1. Pay attention to the domain and URL
  2. Read the "About Us" section of the site
  3. Look at the quotes in a story
  4. Look at who said the quotes

All of the suggestions require readers to take the time to understand the website, publication, and/or publisher. A little skepticism is healthy. Also verify the persons quoted and whether the persons quoted are who the article claims. And, verify that any images used actually relate to the event.

We all have to be smarter consumers of news in order to stay informed and meet our civic duties, which includes voting. Nobody wants to vote for politicians that don't represent their interests because they've been duped. To the above list, I would add:

  • Read news wires. These sites include the raw, unfiltered news about who, when, where, and what happened. Some suggested sources: : Associated Press (AP), Reuters, and United Press International (UPI)
  • Learn to recognize advertisements
  • Learn the differences between different types of content: news, opinion, analysis, satire/humor, and entertainment. Reputable sites will label them to help readers.

If you don't know the differences and can't spot each type, then you are likely to get duped.


Study: Almost 40 Percent of U.S. Smartphone Owners Use Voice Recognition

According to a recent study by Parks Associations, a market research and consulting company, 39 percent of smartphone owners in the United States use some form of voice recognition (e.g., Siri, Google Now). The usage is higher (more than 50 percent) for iPhone owners compared to Android owners (less than 33 percent). Harry Wang, Director of Health & Mobile Product Research at Parks Associations said:

“Smartphone penetration has reached 86% of U.S. broadband households, so it is a mature market, with users, particularly younger consumers and iOS users, exploring more intelligent features and interfaces, including voice control... The growing consumer interest in voice control features is driving this technology into new IoT areas... Following Apple’s lead with Siri, other brands have created ‘personalities’ for their voice-control solutions, like Alexa for Amazon Echo and Cortana for Windows Phones."

Usage is higher among younger persons. 48 percent of smartphone users ages 18-24, use voice recognition software, usage of the “Siri” voice recognition software increased from 40 to 52 percent between 2013 and 2015. In total, about 15 percent of all U.S. broadband households use Siri.

About 70 percent of smartphone owners who use voice recognition are satisfied. 38 percent said they are very satisfied, and 9 percent said they are not satisfied.

Additional findings about U.S. smartphone users:

  • More than 70 percent watch short streaming video clips, and more than 40 percent watch long streaming videos.
  • 36 percent use WiFi calling.
  • 26 percent use a payment app for purchases at retail stores, and
  • 24 percent stream video from their phones to a second screen (e.g., TV, PC).

Learn more in the "360 View: Mobility and the App Economy" report, or the press release, by Parks Associates.


Report: Consumer Usage of Video Streaming Services in The US

New research revealed that 16% of the "viewing population" have multiple subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) services in their homes. That's up from 10% three years ago. Consumer market research firm Gfk studied consumers in the United States, and also found that almost half (49%) of the "viewing population" subscribes to at least one SVOD service, 17% have both Netflix and Amazon Prime, 9% have Netflix and Hulu Plus, and 5% have all three of the major services.

The “viewing population” includes consumers who watch video at least once per week via any format: regular TV, streaming, or otherwise. According to Gfk, this is 95 percent of the total number of people 13 to 64 US years of age. Gfk also found that consumers:

"... who pay for combinations of Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and other subscription streaming services – are more likely to have kids under 18 in their homes (50%, versus an average of 41% among all weekly viewers of any type). “Self-bundlers” also have higher mean incomes than average weekly viewers – at $90,000 per year versus $76,000 – but are less likely to subscribe to traditional pay TV services.."

GfK interviewed 1,054 consumers in the United States for its “Over-the-Top TV 2016: A Complete Video Landscape” report. In related studies during the past year, Gfk found:

Below is an infographic from Gfk's "Over the Top TV 2016" report with additional information:

Infographic from Gfk Over the Top TV 2016 report. Click to view larger version


Study Confirms Consumers Ignore Online Policies And Agree To Anything

Researchers have confirmed what privacy advocates and government regulators have suspected for a long time: Internet users often ignore online policies: privacy and terms of service. And those consumers who read policies, pay insufficient attention.

In a working paper titled, "The Biggest Lie On The Internet," researchers tested 543 college students (from a communications class) by having them sign up for NameDrop, a fictitious social networking site (SNS). 47 Percent of test participants were female, and the average age of all participants was 19. 62 percent identified as Caucasian, 15 percent as Asian, 6 percent as Black, 2 percent as Hispanic/Latin, and 3 percent as mixed race/ethnicity.

Authors of the working paper were Jonathann A. Obar, a Research Associate at the the Quello Center for Telecommunications Management and Law at Michigan State University, and Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, at the University of Connecticut. The paper was submitted for peer review and to the U.S. Feral Communications Commission (FCC).

The study found that almost three of four test participants -- 74 percent -- skipped reading the privacy policy by clicking on a "Quick Join" button. Those that did read the privacy policy spent a little over a minute -- 73 seconds -- reading the 7,977-word policy. Test participants spent less time -- 51 seconds -- reading the 4,316-word TOS policy.

The researchers expected test participants to spend longer times reading the policies because persons with a 12-grade or college education read about 250 to 280 words per minute. So, the it should have taken 29 to 32 minutes to read the 7,977-word privacy policy. The range of actual reading times was 2.96 seconds to 37 minutes; with 80 percent of test participants spending less than one minute of reading time.

The paper did not mention if reading times varied by device (e.g., phone, tablet, laptop, desktop). The researchers identified three factors that predict policy reading times:

  1. Information Overload: if the persons perceived the policies to be too long andtoo much work,
  2. Nothing to Hide: persons view the policies as irrelevant because they do nothing wrong, and
  3. Difficult to Understand: persons believe that they can't understand the language in the policies.

The researchers inserted problematic clauses into the policies which test participants should have spotted and inquired about:

"Implications were revealed as 98 percent missed NameDrop TOS 'gotcha clauses' about data sharing with the National Security Agency (NSA) and employers, and about providing a first-born child as payment for SNS access."

Only 15 percent (83 persons) expressed concerns about NameDrop's policies. Of the 83 persons who expressed concerns, 11 mentioned the NSA clause, and nine mentioned the child-assignment clause. The rest mentioned concerns about the length of the policies and the trustworthiness of the SNS.

The study also asked test participants how long they spent reading policies. The findings supported the "privacy paradox" found by other researchers:

"The paradox suggests that when asked, individuals appear to value privacy, but when behaviors are examined, individual actions suggest that privacy is not a high priority... When participants were asked to self-report their engagement with privacy and TOS policies, results suggested average reading times of approximately five minutes..."

So, test participants said they spent about 5 minutes reading policies while their actual times were about a minute or less, if they read the policies at all.

With most consumers skipping online policies, they have given companies the power to insert any clauses desired into these policies. This has implications for consumers' ability to control their online reputation, privacy, and resolve conflicts (e.g., binding arbitration instead of courts).

This also has implications for how governments enforce data protection for their citizens. Historically:

"... approaches to privacy and increasingly reputation protections by governments throughout the world often draw from a contentious model referred to as the 'notice and choice' privacy framework. Notice and choice evolved from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) Fair Information Practice Principles, developed in the 1970s to address growing information privacy concerns raised by digitization. In the early 1980s, the FIPPs were promoted by the OECD as part of an international set of privacy guidelines, contributing to the implementation of data protection laws and guidelines in the U.S., Canada, the EU, Australia, and elsewhere... The notice and choice privacy framework was designed to "put individuals in charge of the collection and use of their personal information" (Reidenberg et al, 2014: 3)..."

The researchers' focused upon the:

"... notice component, noted by the FTC as "the most fundamental principle" (FTC, 1998: 7) of personal information protection... As the FTC (1998) notes, choice and related principles attempting to offer data control "are only meaningful when a consumer has notice of an entity's policies, and his or her rights with respect thereto." Notice policies typically... appear on websites, applications, are sent in the mail, provided in-person, generally when an individual connects with the entity in question for the first time, and increasingly when policies change. Despite suggestions that notice policy in particular is deeply flawed, strategies for strengthening notice policy continue to be seen as central to address, for example, privacy concerns associated with corporate and government surveillance, and consumer protection concerns about Big Data..."

So, the biggest lie on the Internet is that consumers agree to policies, which they really can't because they haven't read them. Governments, privacy advocates, companies, and usability professionals need to find a better way, because the current approach clearly isn't working:

"The policy implications of these findings contribute to the community of critique suggesting that notice and choice policy is deeply flawed, if not an absolute failure. Transparency is a great place to start, as is notice and choice policy; however, all are terrible places to finish. They leave digital citizens with nothing more than an empty promise of protection, an impractical opportunity for data privacy self-management, and as Daniel Solove (2012) analogizes, too much homework. This doesn't even begin to address the challenges unique to children in the realm of digital reputation..."

Absolutely, since many sites allow children as young as 14 to sign up. Policy reading rates are probably worse among children ages 14 - 17.

Download the working paper: "The Biggest Lie on The Internet" (Adobe PDF). the paper is also available here. The study used students majoring in communications. I wonder if the results would have been different with business majors or law students. What do you think?


Survey: Daily Newspaper Readership

Who reads newspapers in the United States? Do people read print versions, or has readership migrated to online versions? How has this changed over time? In its "State of the News Media 2016" report, Pew Research released results about the demographics of daily newspaper readership:

Percent of Adults Reading Daily Newspapers
Age Group 1999 2007 2015
18 - 24 42 33 16
25 - 34 44 34 17
35 - 44 54 43 21
45 - 54 63 53 28
55 - 64 69 59 38
65+ 72 66 50

Source: Pew Research Center - Daily Readership By Age - June, 2016

Percent of Adults Reading Daily Newspapers
Education Level 1999 2007 2015
High School Graduate 54 46 27
Some College 59 50 31
College Graduate 63 53 31
Some Post Graduate 68 59 38
Post Graduate Degree 60 62 39

Source: Pew Research Center - Daily Readership By Education Level - June, 2016

Percent of Adults Reading Daily Newspapers
Ethnic Group 1999 2007 2015
White 58 49 31
Black/African-American 51 42 27
Asian 51 41 22
Spanish/Hispanic Origin 39 31 18
Other 52 43 22

Source: Pew Research Center - Daily Readership By Ethnic Group - June, 2016

About overall newspaper readership, 51 percent read the print version exclusively, 5 percent read the desktop version only, another 5 percent 5% read only the mobile version, and about 7 percent read both the mobile and desktop versions.

However, some readers are subscribers and some aren't. The latter group reads newspaper articles at other sites:

"... looking at newspaper subscribers as the only readers of newspaper content misses an important part of the story. The share of newspaper readers who report reading a newspaper in digital form, or who have digital subscriptions, is not the same as the share of Americans more broadly who come across individual stories hosted on a newspaper’s website as they surf the web. The findings reported above are based on survey questions asked of individuals who self-reported reading a newspaper online or in print in the past 30 days. However, it does not include everyone who lands upon a newspaper website while searching for news information or following a link from an email or social networking post. These consumers of individual bits of information may not remember having read a newspaper, or have even realized that they did. (We have found that most people who read an article on a website do not read any other articles on that site in a given month, suggesting that this kind of incidental readership is common.) Indeed, as revealed in the digital audience section below, when it comes to all newspaper website visitors – not just subscribers – the newspapers analyzed all had more digital traffic than print subscribers."

The "State of the News Media 2016" report also includes information about cable news, local TV news, network news, online news, alternative weeklies, podcasts, and more.


In The Modern Era, More Young Adults Live With Their Parents

As a parent of three children who are now adults, this news item caught my attention. The Pew Research Center reported:

"Broad demographic shifts in marital status, educational attainment and employment have transformed the way young adults in the U.S. are living, and an analysis of census data highlights the implications of these changes for the most basic element of their lives – where they call home. In 2014, for the first time in more than 130 years, adults ages 18 to 34 were slightly more likely to be living in their parents’ home than they were to be living with a spouse or partner in their own household."

The data:

  Percent of Adults
Ages 18 to 34
Living Arrangement 1880 1940 1960 2014
Living at home with parents 30 35 20 32.1
Married or co-habitation in own household 45 46 62 31.6
Living alone, single parents, and other head of household 3 3 5 14
Other living arrangement 22 16 13 22

Several factors contributed to this shift:

"The first is the postponement of, if not retreat from, marriage. The median age of first marriage has risen steadily for decades. In addition, a growing share of young adults may be eschewing marriage altogether. A previous Pew Research Center analysis projected that as many as one-in-four of today’s young adults may never marry. While cohabitation has been on the rise, the overall share of young adults either married or living with an unmarried partner has substantially fallen since 1990.

In addition... employed young men are much less likely to live at home than young men without a job, and employment among young men has fallen significantly in recent decades. The share of young men with jobs peaked around 1960 at 84%. In 2014, only 71% of 18- to 34-year-old men were employed. Similarly with earnings, young men’s wages (after adjusting for inflation) have been on a downward trajectory since 1970 and fell significantly from 2000 to 2010. As wages have fallen, the share of young men living in the home of their parent(s) has risen."

And there are differences by gender:

"For men ages 18 to 34, living at home with mom and/or dad has been the dominant living arrangement since 2009. 'In 2014, 28 percent of young men were living with a spouse or partner in their own home, while 35 percent were living in the home of their parent(s). For their part, young women are on the cusp of crossing over this threshold: They are still more likely to be living with a spouse or romantic partner (35%) than they are to be living with their parent(s) (29%). In 2014, more young women (16%) than young men (13%) were heading up a household without a spouse or partner. This is mainly because women are more likely than men to be single parents living with their children..."

Additional findings:

"In 2014, 40 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds who had not completed high school lived with parent(s), the highest rate observed since the 1940 Census when information on educational attainment was first collected.

Young adults in states in the South Atlantic, West South Central and Pacific United States have recently experienced the highest rates on record of living with parent(s).

With few exceptions, since 1880 young men across all races and ethnicities have been more likely than young women to live in the home of their parent(s)."

The methodology included decennial census data and large samples, typically 1 percent of young adults nationwide.


Social Networking Sites With The Largest Number of News Users

Recently, some friends and I were discussing the wisdom of getting your news from social networking websites (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Youtube, LinkedIn, etc.) instead of directly from news media sites. Apparently, many consumers get their news from such sites.

The Pew Research Center reported that most adults in the United States, 62 percent, get their news from social networking sites. The corresponding statistic in 2012 was 49 percent. Fewer social media site users get their news from other platforms: local television (46 percent), cable TV (31 percent), nightly network TV (30 percent), news websites/apps (28 percent), radio (25 percent), and print newspapers (20 percent). 

Pew analyzed which social networking sites were used the most for news, and whether consumers used multiple sites to obtain news. The Pew Research Center found:

"Two-thirds of Facebook users (66 percent) get news on the site, nearly six-in-ten Twitter users (59 percent) get news on Twitter, and seven-in-ten Reddit users get news on that platform. On Tumblr, the figure sits at 31 percent..."

The corresponding statistics are 23 percent for Instagram, 21 percent for Youtube, 19 percent for LinkedIn, and 17 percent at Snapchat. The implications:

"Facebook is by far the largest social networking site, reaching 67% of U.S. adults. The two-thirds of Facebook users who get news there, then, amount to 44% of the general population. YouTube has the next greatest reach in terms of general usage, at 48% of U.S. adults. But only about a fifth of its users get news there, which amounts to 10% of the adult population. That puts it on par with Twitter, which has a smaller user base (16% of U.S. adults) but a larger portion getting news there."

About audience overlap, Pew found that most people (64 percent) get their news from one social media site. 26 percent get their news from two social media sites, and 10 percent get their news from three social media sites. Pew also found that more users at Reddit, Twitter, and LinkedIn seek out news versus stumbling across it by accident:

  Percent of news users of each
site who mostly get news online
Social Networking Site While doing
other things
Because they're
looking for it
Instagram 63 37
Facebook 62 38
Youtube 58 41
LinkedIn 46 51
Twitter 45 54
Reddit 42 55

Who are the news users at the five largest social sites with news users? The users vary by site:

"... while there is some crossover, each site appeals to a somewhat different group. Instagram news consumers stand out from other groups as more likely to be non-white, young and, for all but Facebook, female. LinkedIn news consumers are more likely to have a college degree than news users of the other four platforms; Twitter news users are the second most likely."

The demographic data:

Pew-social-news-users

Some of you are probably wondering about Google+ and Pinterest. Pew removed three social media sites because:

"... Pinterest, which has been shown to have a small portion of users who use it for news; Myspace, which has largely transitioned to a music site; and Google+, which through its recent transformations is being phased out as a social networking site."

The survey was conducted from January 12 to February 8, 2016 and included 4,654 respondents (4,339 by web and 315 by mail). The methodology included a randomly-selected subset of U.S. adults (6,301 total web-based persons and 474 total mail persons.


Survey: U.S. Households Have More Connected Televisions Than Set-Top Boxes

A recent survey found that most households in the United States with televisions have them connected to the Internet. According to the Leichtman Research Group:

"... 65% of US TV households have at least one television set connected to the Internet via a video game system, a smart TV set, a Blu-ray player, and/or a stand-alone device (like Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, or Amazon Fire TV) -- up from 44% in 2013, and 24% in 2010... 74% [of households] have more than one device... Overall, there are more connected TV devices in US households than there are pay-TV set-top boxes..."

The survey included 1,206 households. It also included the types of televisions:

"79% of all TV sets in US households are HDTVs -- an increase from 34% of all TV sets in 2010, and 3% in 2004..."

And, satisfaction:

"70% of all [households] with a connected TV agree that streaming services like Netflix are easy to access via connected TV devices... 20% with a pay-TV HD set-top box agree that set-top boxes from TV companies are a waste of money, while 44 percent disagree... 42% [of households] with a pay-TV HD set-top box agree that set-top boxes from TV companies provide features that add value to the TV service, while 16% disagree... 68% [of households] with 3 or more set-top boxes are very satisfied with their pay-TV provider, compared to 54% [for households] with 1-2 set-top boxes..."

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has proposed unlocking set-top boxes to encourage more innovation, competition, choices, and lower prices for consumers. That's welcome news for households dissatisfied with set-top boxes they are forced to purchase from cable-TV providers.


Report: Significant Security Risks With Healthcare And Financial Services Mobile Apps

Arxan Technologies logo Arxan Technologies recently released its fifth annual report about the state of application security. This latest report also highlighted some differences between how information technology (I.T.) professionals and consumers view the security of healthcare and financial services mobile apps. Overall, Arxan found critical vulnerabilities:

"84 percent of the US FDA-approved apps tested did not adequately address at least two of the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) Mobile Top 10 Risks. Similarly, 80 percent of the apps tested that were formerly approved by the UK National Health Service (NHS) did not adequately address at least two of the OWASP Mobile Top 10 Risks... 95 percent of the FDA-approved apps, and 100 percent of the apps formerly approved by the NHS, lacked binary protection, which could result in privacy violations, theft of personal health information, and tampering... 100 percent of the mobile finance apps tested, which are commonly used for mobile banking and for electronic payments, were shown to be susceptible to code tampering and reverse-engineering..."

Some background about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA revised its guidelines for mobile medical apps in September, 2015. The top of that document clearly stated, "Contains Nonbinding Regulations." The document also explained which apps the FDA regulates (link added):

"Many mobile apps are not medical devices (meaning such mobile apps do not meet the definition of a device under section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act)), and FDA does not regulate them. Some mobile apps may meet the definition of a medical device but because they pose a lower risk to the public, FDA intends to exercise enforcement discretion over these devices (meaning it will not enforce requirements under the FD&C Act). The majority of mobile apps on the market at this time fit into these two categories. Consistent with the FDA’s existing oversight approach that considers functionality rather than platform, the FDA intends to apply its regulatory oversight to only those mobile apps that are medical devices and whose functionality could pose a risk to a patient’s safety if the mobile app were to not function as intended. This subset of mobile apps the FDA refers to as mobile medical apps."

The Arxan report found that consumers are concerned about app mobile security:

80 percent of mobile app users would change providers if they knew the apps they were using were not secure. 82 percent would change providers if they knew alternative apps offered by similar service providers were more secure."

Arxan commissioned a a third party which surveyed 1,083 persons in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan during November, 2015. 268 survey participants were I.T. professionals and 815 participants were consumers. Also, Arxan hired Mi3 to test mobile apps during October and November, 2015. Those tests included 126 health and financial mobile apps covering both the Apple iOS and Android platforms, 19 mobile health apps approved by the FDA, and 15 mobile health apps approved3 by the UK NHS.

One difference in app security perceptions between the two groups: 82 percent of I.T. professionals believe "everything is being done to protect my apps" while only 57 percent of consumers hold that belief. To maintain privacy and protect sensitive personal information, Arxan advises consumers to:

  1. Buy apps only from reputable app stores,
  2. Don't "jail break" your mobile devices, and
  3. Demand that app developers disclose upfront the security methods and features in their apps.

The infographic below presents more results from the consolidated report. Three reports by Arxan Technologies are available: consolidated, healthcare, and financial services.

Arxan Technologies. 5th Annual State of App Security infographic
Infographic reprinted with permission.


Survey: Bankers Expect Consumers To Use Wearable And Smart Home Devices For Banking

Pegasystems logo Would you use a smart watch, fitness band, or other wearable device for banking? How about your smart television or refrigerator? Many bankers think you will, and are racing to integrate a broader range of mobile devices and technologies into their banking services. A recent survey of financial executives found that:

"... 20 per cent expect it to be common for consumers to make financial transactions using wearables within one year, 59 per cent within two years and 91 per cent within five years... 87 per cent expect it to be common for consumers to make financial transactions using Smart TVs and 68 per cent via home appliances."

The survey included 500 executives globally in several financial areas: banking, financial advice, consumer finance, investment management, insurance, and payments. So, consumers are likely to see these changes not just at your bank, but in a variety of financial and insurance transactions. Here's why:

"... too many banks are out of touch with what customers really want: one survey found 62 per cent of retail banking executives believed their bank offered excellent service compared to just 35 per cent of customers.... Millennials will have annual spending power of US$1. trillion [in 2020] and represent 30 per cent of total retail sales... Millennials not only have an appetite for disruptive new technologies but also an affinity with brand-savvy digital leaders... The Millennial Disruption Index, a three-year study of industry disruption conducted by Viacom subsidiary Scratch, found that banking was most vulnerable to disruption..."

The report discussed the desire by executives to serve customers via a variety of methods:

"Today’s customers expect a flawless end-to-end experience across all channels, yet fewer than 4 per cent of our respondents say they have achieved full omni-channel integration... by 2020, 89 per cent of our respondents expect to achieve full omni-channel integration. This either suggests a massive surge of investment over the next five years – or an industry in denial about the scale of the task ahead... 70 per cent expect video chat to largely replace branch appointments. Indeed, six out of ten now believe a digital-only channel model is viable."

Bankers view the Internet-of-Things (IoT) as both a collection of endpoint devices to provide services through, and a rich source of data:

"...93 per cent agree that finding innovative ways to provide value-added services to customers based on data-driven insight will be crucial to long-term success... 86 per cent agree that once consumers recognize the data potential of the IoT they will increasingly seek to benchmark their own behavior against their peers..."

Banks will probably develop more non-human (e.g., self-service) interfaces:

"... 76 per cent agree the widespread use of virtual assistants such as Siri on the iPhone means customers are more willing to engage with automated assistance and advice... almost three quarters of our respondents agree that in the future customers will interact with a human-like avatar..."

Another technology being considered:

"... 60 per cent [of survey respondents] believe that blockchain, a distributed public ledger which can securely record any information and the ownership of any asset, will prove to be the most significant technology development to affect financial services since the Internet and 45 per cent think the combination of blockchain wallets and peerto-peer (P2P) lending could herald the end of banking as we know it... 12 per cent expect the settlement of insurance claims using IoT data, blockchain and smart contracts to be mainstream practice within two years and 74 per cent expect it to be mainstream by 2025..."

Don't expect your bank to provide these new services next week or next month. It will take them time. New systems must be built, tested, debugged, and integrated with legacy computer systems and processes. All of this suggests that to fund their investments in innovation projects, banks probably won't lower their retail banking prices and fees (e.g., checking, savings, etc.) any time soon. While writing this blog the past 8+ years, I've found it wise to always keep an eye on the banks.

Download "The Future of Retail Financial Services" report by Cognizant, Marketforce, and Pegasystems.


Survey: Smart Home Technology. What It Is And Who Has It

Coldwell Banker released the results of a 2015 survey of 4,000 adults in the United States about smart home technology. Survey participants consider a home a "smart home" if it contains the new security, temperature, lighting, and safety devices:

"When asked about what needs to be in a home for it to be considered "smart," the top choices were security (e.g., locks and alarm systems - 63 percent), temperature (e.g., thermostats and fans - 63 percent), lighting (e.g., light bulbs and lighting systems - 58 percent) and safety (e.g., fire / carbon monoxide detectors and nightlights - 56 percent)."

Additionally, 76 percent of survey participants said that having only one of the four above categories of smart technology in a home isn't enough for it to be considered a "smart home." And, 60 percent said that a smart home should have have at least three of the four above categories of smart products.

Key findings about smart technology adoption: 45 percent of survey participants said they either own smart home technology or plan to buy it during 2016. Of people who do not currently have smart home technology in their home, 27 percent said they plan to acquire it during 2016. And, 70 percent of people who already have smart home technology said buying their first smart home device made them more likely to buy another.

The gateway device into a smart home is entertainment. 44 percent of people with smart home technology already have smart entertainment devices: smart televisions, smart speakers.

Obviously, Caldwell banker, a real estate firm, is not a disinterested party. A key goal of the survey was to determine if smart devices help people sell their homes, and if so which types of devices sellers should install in their home:

"More than half of homeowners (54 percent) would purchase or install smart home products if they were selling their home and knew that doing so would make it sell faster. Of homeowners who said they'd purchase or install smart home products, 65 percent would pay $1,500 or more and 40 percent would pay $3,000 or more to make their home smart. Of Millennial homeowners (ages 18 to 34) who would purchase or install smart home products, 72 percent would pay $1,500 or more and 44 percent would pay $3,000 or more to make their home smart."

Adoption of the technology occurs across both age and income groups:

"... 40 percent of those over 65 who own smart home products currently have smart temperature products, compared to only 25 percent of Millennials (ages 18 to 34). Americans with a household income of $50k to $75k and those with a household income of $75k to $100k are adopting smart home technology at nearly identical paces..."

I found it very interesting that home buyers said the least popular smart home devices are smart appliances (e.g., smart refrigerators, wireless ovens, washers, clothes dryers) and entertainment.The survey did not seem to address smart home privacy. Privacy and security experts have advised consumers to shop wisely for devices with operating system software that is updated frequently, just like your home computers and tablets. Back in 2014, the Ars Technica blog cautioned:

"Your smart TV is not really a TV so much as an all-in-one computer that runs Android, WebOS, or some custom operating system of the manufacturer's invention. And where once it was purely a device for receiving data over a coax cable, it's now equipped with bidirectional networking interfaces, exposing the Internet to the TV and the TV to the Internet... Herein lies the problem, because if there's one thing that companies like Samsung have demonstrated in the past, it's a total unwillingness to provide a lifetime of software fixes and updates. Even smartphones, which are generally assumed to have a two-year lifecycle (with replacements driven by cheap or "free" contract-subsidized pricing), rarely receive updates for the full two years (Apple's iPhone being the one notable exception)."

So, shop wisely for smart home devices that include regular software updates. And look for devices that are truly smart, and not simply outfitted with a touch-screen and Internet connection. You are going to pay (a lot) more, so make sure you get more. Otherwise, you are inviting problems into your not-so-smart home.

View more information about Caldwell Banker's Smart Home Marketplace Survey.


Survey: 40 Percent Of Companies Expect Data Breaches Caused By Employees

eSecurity Planet reported the results of a recent survey of information technology managers and employees. The survey included workers int he United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia. The key findings:

"... 40 percent of companies expect to experience a data breach resulting from employee behavior in the next 12 months... 75 percent of employees believe their company doesn't give them enough information about data policies... 58 percent don't understand what would actually constitute a security breach... 50 percent of respondents admitted that they disregard their companies' data protection policies in order to get their jobs done."

The phrase "insider data breach" refers to data breaches caused by employees. Companies seem focused on external threats from hackers, while not focusing also upon insider threats. Lax or untrained employees and poor internal processes are often the root causes.

these survey results are not good. The results indicate that companies are not doing everything they can (and should) to protect the sensitive customer, client, employee, and retiree information they have collected.


American Adults Who Don't Use The Internet. Who They Are And Why

A few weeks ago, the Pew Research Center released the results of survey about adults in the United States that don't use the Internet. You're probably thinking: everyone uses the Internet. Right? Afterall, 64 percent of Americans have smartphones and 19 percent of them use their phones to go online.

Actually, a substantial chunk of the population doesn't go online. The Pew Research Center survey described American adults who don't use the Internet.

Overall, in 2015 about 15 percent of American adults don't use the Internet. Across the years, things have gotten better. The comparable figure in 2000 was 48 percent, and 24 percent in 2010. However, in 2015 equal portions of men (15 percent) and women (15 percent) don't use the Internet. The numbers vary more by race, age, income, and residence:

U.S. Adults% Don't Use The Internet
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
14
20
18
5
Less than $30K
$30K - $49.9K
$50K - $74.9K
$75K or more
25
14
5
3
18 - 29
30 - 49
50 - 64
65 or older
3
6
19
39
Less than high school
High school
Some college
College graduates
33
23
9
4
Urban
Suburban
Rural
13
13
24

The 2015 findings are based upon three surveys of 5,005 adults in the United States. In 2013, Pew Research Center surveyed American adults who don't use the Internet:

Reason For Not Using The Internet% Adults
Not interested 21
Don't have a computer 13
Too difficult or frustrating 10
Don't know how / don't have the skills 8
Too old to learn 8
Don't have access 7
Too expensive 6
Don't need it / don't want it 6
Consider it a waste of time 4
Physically unable (e.g., poor eyesight, disabled) 4
Too busy / don't have the time 3
Worried about privacy / spam / spyware / hackers 3

Of these adults that don't use the Internet:

  • 44 percent have asked a friend or family member to look up something online for them,
  • 23 percent live in households were somebody else in that household uses the Internet, and
  • 14 percent used the Internet previously and stopped.

What to make of this? I look at the people who said Internet access is too expensive or they don't have access. While overall our country appears strong, there are areas of the country were citizens lack one or several services we all take for granted. There are Internet deserts, broadband deserts, banking deserts, public library deserts, and food deserts.


Study: American Adults Are Always Connected And Dependent Upon Their Mobile Devices

Bank of America logo Recently, Bank of America released the results of its second annual Trends in Mobility study.The report explored how several generations of adults -- millennials, Generation X, baby boomers, and seniors -- use their mobile devices, including banking. Key findings:

  • About three-quarters (71 percent) of respondents sleep with–or next to–their mobile phones. Younger millennials (ages 18-24) are most likely to sleep with their smartphone on the bed (34%)
  • The first thing people reach for when they wake up is their mobile device (35 percent) compared to coffee (17 percent), their toothbrush (13 percent), and their spouse (10 percent)
  • Similarly, at the end of the day almost one-quarter (23 percent) of survey respondents fall asleep with their smartphone in their hand. 44 percent of  younger millennials (ages 18-24) fall asleep with their devices
  • Throughout the day, 54 percent of younger millennials (and 36 percent of all survey respondents) constantly check and use their mobile devices. 36 percent of younger millennials and 21 percent of all survey respondents check their devices once per hour
  • Almost four in 10 (38 percent) of consumers say they never disconnect from their mobile phones. Only 7 percent unplug during vacation
  • Almost half (44 percent) of survey respondents said they couldn’t last a day without their mobile devices. Younger people are more dependent. 41 percent of older millennials (ages 25-34) and 37 percent of Generation X (ages 35-49) said they couldn't last a day without their devices
  • 46 percent of survey respondents said ages 13 - 15 is the best age for parents to buy smartphones for their children. 19 percent said ages 16 - 18. 14 percent said the best age is when children can buy their own phones
  • The constant online usage extends to online banking

Bank of America Trends in Consumer Mobility study

Mobile seems to be replacing visits to physical bank branches. 83 percent of respondents have visited a physical bank branch during the past 6 months. While half (51 percent) of all survey respondents use either mobile or online as their primary banking method, only 23 percent of respondents and 6 percent of younger millennials use physical bank branches for most transactions. That has implications for low-paid tellers and branch employees.

Earlier this year, Bank of America raised prices for its checking account customers. Last year, the bank paid $16.65 billion to settle investigations by the U.S. Justice Department (DOJ) and several states' attorney generals into the bank's former and current subsidiaries, including Countrywide Financial Corporation and Merrill Lynch, related to the packaging, marketing, sale, and issuance of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS).

The results align with other studies. The Pew Research Center studied mobile etiquette, and found that while 92 percent of American adults have cellphones, 31 percent never turn off their devices and 45 percent rarely turn off their devices. About etiquette, Pew found:

  • 77 percent of survey respondents thought it okay to use phones while walking down the street
  • 75 percent thought it okay to use phones on public transportation (e.g., buses, subways, commuter trains)
  • 38 percent thought it okay to use phones in restaurants
  • 5 percent thought it okay to use phones during meetings
  • 89 percent used their phone during their most recent social gathering

The survey by Pew included 3,217 adults in the U.S. from May 30 to June 30, 2014. Pew also found:

"As a general proposition, Americans view cell phones as distracting and annoying when used in social settings — but at the same time, many use their own devices during group encounters... 82% of adults say that when people use their phones in these settings it frequently or occasionally hurts the conversation. Meanwhile, 33% say that cell phone use in these situations frequently or occasionally contributes to the conversation and atmosphere of the group. Women are more likely than men to feel cell use at social gatherings hurts the group... those over age 50 (45%) are more likely than younger cell owners (29%) to feel that cellphone use frequently hurts group conversations... Young adults have higher tolerance for cellphone use in public and in social settings; they also are more likely to have used their phone during a recent social gathering..."

Why people use their mobile devices during social gatherings:

  • 45 percent: post a photo or video of the social gathering
  • 41 percent: to share something that happened in the group
  • 38 percent: get information that might be of interest to the group
  • 31 percent: connect with others the group knows
  • 16 percent: no longer interested in the group's activity
  • 10 percent: to avoid participating in the group's activity

The survey results are great news for banks, telecommunications companies, mobile device manufacturers, app developers, and data brokers that want to collect location data and serve location-based advertisements.

The Bank of America survey, conducted by Braun Research, Inc. from April 13 - 26, 2015, included 1,000 U.S. adults ages 18 or older. Download the 2015 Trends in Consumer Mobility report (Adobe PDF) by Bank of America.


More People Get Their News From Twitter And Facebook

Facebook logo Facebook is not just about lolcats, selfies, and epic partying. More people get their news from Facebook and Twitter.

Pew Research reported several findings from a recent survey of 2,035 U.S. adults. 63 percent of users get their news from the Twitter and Facebook. Both social networking services saw increases. In 2013, it was 52 percent for Twitter users and 47 percent for Facebook users. The number of adults using both services (17 percent use Twitter and 66 percent use Facebook) remained fairly constant during this period.

There were more key findings:

"Twitter news users are more likely than their counterparts on Facebook to report seeing news about four out of 11 topics: national government and politics (72% vs. 61%), international affairs (63% vs. 51%), business (55% vs. 42%) and sports (70% vs. 55%)... The rise in the share of social media users getting news on Facebook or Twitter cuts across nearly every demographic group... When it comes specifically to news and information about government and politics, Facebook users are more likely to post and respond to content, while Twitter users are more likely to follow news organizations."

Twitter logo Pew Research Center conducted the survey jointly with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Both social networking sites have focused upon breaking news content. Twitter will soon launch:

"... its long-rumored news feature, “Project Lightning.” The feature will allow anyone, whether they are a Twitter user or not, to view a feed of tweets, images and videos about live events as they happen, curated by a bevy of new employees with “newsroom experience.” And, in early 2015, Twitter purchased and launched the live video-streaming app Periscope...  in May, Facebook launched Instant Articles, a trial project that allows media companies to publish stories directly to the Facebook platform... in late June, Facebook started introducing its “Trending” sidebar to allow users to filter by topic and see only trending news about politics, science and technology, sports or entertainment."