AOL Issued Statement About A Data Breach And Criminal Activity Affecting Its Customers
Avoiding "Big Data" And Tracking. A Consumer Shares Her Experience

Massachusetts And Several States Attorney Generals Investigate Breach At Experian

I apologize to readers. I am almost caught up with blog posts after the DDoS attack last week against Typepad, the blogging service I use.

Last week, the Office of the Attorney General of Massachusetts announced an investigation, along with several other states' attorney generals, of the Experian credit reporting agency after criminals were able to obtain consumers' sensitive financial data. The statement said:

"On March 3, Hieu Ngo, a Vietnamese national, pleaded guilty to federal charges in New Hampshire federal court involving his operation of a website that offered his clients access to sensitive personal information for more than 200 million U.S. citizens, including social security numbers, which could be used to commit identity theft or financial fraud... Ngo gained access to the personal information when he obtained an account with a U.S. company known as Court Ventures by posing as a private investigator from Singapore. Due to a reciprocal data sharing agreement between Court Ventures and U.S. Info Search, LLC of Columbus, Ohio, Ngo’s account allowed him access to a database that allegedly contained names, addresses, dates of births, and social security numbers of more than 200 million U.S. citizens."

Ngo may have already resold stolen credit reports, since about 1,300 persons accessed his online account:

"For at least an 18-month period, more than 3.1 million queries were made to the database using Ngo’s account. According to Experian, it purchased Court Ventures’ assets in March 2012, and continued to honor Ngo as a customer until December 2012."

Experian and Court Ventures have sued each other about indemnification: who will pay the costs for this breach. Regardless of who pays in the end, it is bad. Very bad. With 200 million consumers affected, the breach will victimize consumers in most, if not all, states. Massachusetts AG Martha Coakley said:

"We are especially concerned about allegations that the companies may have known of this incident for over a year, while not reporting it so consumer could protect themselves. We will actively investigate this matter and in the meantime, we remind consumers to take proactive steps to protect their personal information.”

The Massachusetts Attorney General advised consumers:

  1. Order copies of your credit reports from the three major credit-reporting agencies (e.g., Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion) and review them for fraudulent entries.
  2. If you notice fraudulent entries on your credit reports, place a Fraud Alert on them.
  3. Review your credit card and debit card statements for fraudulent entries.
  4. Contact the fraud departments at your bank or card issuer to report fraudulent charges.
  5. File a police report with local police if you are a victim of fraud.
  6. Consider placing a Security Freeze on your credit reports for stronger protection.

Consumers that don't have a credit monitoring service can visit AnnualCreditReport.com to order their free credit report once each year from the three major credit reporting agencies (e.g., Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion). Consumers that experience fraud can also submit complaints to the Federal Trade Commission, which tracks fraud affecting consumers.

Consumers who experience problems (e.g., poor customer service, failure to fix fraudulent charges you reported, etc.) with a credit reporting agency, can submit complaints to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, (CFPB). At the CFPB site, click on "the Submit A Complaint" link. The CFPB began overseeing credit reporting agencies in 2012.

Expect to hear more news about this breach investigation.

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