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Silent Phone Calls Indicate The Start Of Identity Theft And Fraud

At some point we all have received these "silent" phone calls. After answering the call, there's nobody on the line. The call is silent and then we hang up. The problem is over, right?

Security experts reported that these "silent" phone calls can be the start of identity theft and fraud. An NPR report explained the identity theft and fraud process.

Step one includes an Internet-based robocall (e.g., an automated phone call using computers) from anywhere in the world -- usually offshore -- by scammers to verify your 10-digit phone number. With the multitude of corporate data breaches, the criminals may have acquired your name and phone number from hackers. Step two is another robocall pretending to be your bank, computer company, collection agency, or tax agency to trick you into revealing sensitive personal information (e.g., e-mail, address, age, bank name, bank account numbers, card numbers, etc.) over the phone.

NPR reported:

"... these robocalls are on the rise because Internet-powered phones make it cheap and easy for scammers to make illegal calls from anywhere in the world... researchers estimate 1 in every 2,200 calls is a fraud attempt."

Experts advise consumers not to disclose any personal information over the phone. Verify the caller first. Demand their name, company name, e-mail, phone number, website address, and how they acquired your phone number. (Most phone scammers will refuse or make excuses.) If the do provide contact information, check to see if matches the contact information you can verify independently (e.g., the phone numbers on the back of your bank card). If it doesn't match, then the caller is probably a scammer.

I always tell callers two things: a) I don't give out personal information over the phone, and b) I need to verify the caller first. If the caller provides a website address, I will check it during the phone call. If the site doesn't exist or looks crappy, that's a huge clue the caller is probably a scammer.

When you disclose personal information over the phone, the criminals' proceed with step three of the identity theft and fraud process. They will contact your bank or credit card company pretending to be you to takeover your account by changing the address on your account. How? The scammers will use the personal information you provided.

What should consumers do when you receive these robocalls? Experts advise that you simply hang up. Don't ask to be taken off their phone lists. Don't access their voicemail system to be removed from their calls. All that does it help the scammers verify your existence.

Parents: now you know what to teach your children about phone calls, privacy, and safety.

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