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Congressional Sources Say The Burr-Feinstein Anti-Encryption Bill is Dead

The Burr-Feinstein anti-encryption bill is apparently dead.

You may remember, a few months ago Senators Richard Burr (R-NC) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee, drafter the Compliance with Court Orders Act of 2016 (CCOA) to force a variety of tech companies to build back doors into their products and services. The draft legislation required software developers, device manufacturers, communications providers (wired and wireless), and "remote computing services (RCS)" to provide the government, upon request, with data in an unencrypted format.

A prior blog post listed the multitude of problems with the bill. The tech industry called the legislation "unworkable."

It seems that the bill has died. Reuters explained why (links added):

"Now, only months later, much of the support is gone, and the push for legislation dead, according to sources in congressional offices, the administration and the tech sector. Draft legislation... will not be introduced this year and, even if it were, would stand no chance of advancing, the sources said. Key among the problems was the lack of White House support for legislation in spite of a high-profile court showdown between the Justice Department and Apple Inc over the suspect iPhone... Tech companies, backed by civil liberties groups, insist that building law enforcement access into phones and other devices would undermine security for everyone-including the U.S. government itself... The CIA and NSA were ambivalent... in part because officials in the agencies feared any new law would interfere with their own encryption efforts... In the meantime, tech companies have accelerated encryption efforts in the wake of the Apple case..."

Good.

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