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Report: Patched Macs Still Vulnerable To Firmware Hacks

Apple Inc. logo I've heard numerous times the erroneous assumption by consumers: "Apple-branded devices don't get computer viruses." Well, they do. Ars Technica reported about a particular nasty hack of vulnerabilities in devices' Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI). Never heard of EFI? Well:

"An analysis by security firm Duo Security of more than 73,000 Macs shows that a surprising number remained vulnerable to such attacks even though they received OS updates that were supposed to patch the EFI firmware. On average, 4.2 percent of the Macs analyzed ran EFI versions that were different from what was prescribed by the hardware model and OS version. 47 Mac models remained vulnerable to the original Thunderstrike, and 31 remained vulnerable to Thunderstrike 2. At least 16 models received no EFI updates at all. EFI updates for other models were inconsistently successful, with the 21.5-inch iMac released in late 2015 topping the list, with 43 percent of those sampled running the wrong version."

This is very bad. EFI hacks are particularly effective and nasty because:

"... they give attackers control that starts with the very first instruction a Mac receives... the level of control attackers get far exceeds what they gain by exploiting vulnerabilities in the OS... That means an attacker who compromises a computer's EFI can bypass higher-level security controls, such as those built into the OS or, assuming one is running for extra protection, a virtual machine hypervisor. An EFI infection is also extremely hard to detect and even harder to remedy, as it can survive even after a hard drive is wiped or replaced and a clean version of the OS is installed."

At-risk EFI versions mean that devices running Windows and Linux operating systems are also vulnerable. Reportedly, the exploit requires plenty of computing and technical expertise, so hackers would probably pursue high-value targets (e.g., journalists, attorneys, government officials, contractors with government clearances) first.

The Duo Labs Report (63 pages, Adobe PDF) lists the specific MacBook, MacBookAir, and MacBookPro models at risk. The researchers shared a draft of the report with Apple before publication. The report's "Mitigation" section provides solutions, including but not limited to:

"Always deploy the full update package as released by Apple, do not remove separate packages from the bundle updater... When possible, deploy Combo OS updates instead of Delta updates... As a general rule of thumb, always run the latest version of macOS..."

Scary, huh? The nature of the attack means that hackers probably can disable the anti-virus software on your device(s), and you probably wouldn't know you've been hacked.

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