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14 posts from January 2018

Health Experts To Facebook: Turn Off Messenger Kids

Facebook logo In December 2017, Facebook launched its Messenger Kids service for children ages six to 13. The service includes a free video calling and messaging app where children can connect only with parent-approved contacts. The ad-free service includes masks, frames, stickers and GIFs for children to, "ids can create fun videos and decorate photos to share moments with loved ones."

Pediatricians and health experts are very concerned. Earlier today, dozens of health professionals sent a letter to Facebook (Adobe PDF) urging the social networking giant to terminate Messenger Kids. The letter stated in part:

"Given Facebook’s enormous reach and marketing prowess, Messenger Kids will likely be the first social media platform widely used by elementary school children. But a growing body of research demonstrates that excessive use of digital devices and social media is harmful to children and teens, making it very likely this new app will undermine children’s healthy development.

Younger children are simply not ready to have social media accounts. They are not old enough to navigate the complexities of online relationships, which often lead to misunderstandings and conflicts even among more mature users. They also do not have a fully developed understanding of privacy, including what’s appropriate to share with others and who has access to their conversations, pictures, and videos.

At a time when there is mounting concern about how social media use affects adolescents’ well being, it is particularly irresponsible to encourage children as young as preschoolers to start using a Facebook product. Social media use by teens is linked to significantly higher rates of depression, and adolescents who spend an hour a day chatting on social networks report less satisfaction with nearly every aspect of their lives. Eighth graders who use social media for 6 - 9 hours per week are 47% more likely to report they are unhappy than their peers who use social media less often. A study of girls between the ages of 10 and 12 found the more they used social networking sites like Facebook, the more likely they were to idealize thinness, have concerns about their bodies, and to have dieted. Teen social media use is also linked to unhealthy sleep habits. Messenger Kids is likely to increase the amount of time pre-school and elementary age kids spend with digital devices. Already, adolescents report difficulty moderating their own social media use: 78% check their phones at least hourly, and 50% say they feel addicted to their phones. Almost half of parents say that regulating their child’s screen time is a constant battle. Messenger Kids will exacerbate this problem... Encouraging kids to move their friendships online will interfere with and displace the face-to-face interactions and play that are crucial for building healthy developmental skills, including the ability to read human emotion, delay gratification, and engage with the physical world..."

The letter contains footnotes to citations with supporting research about the above health concerns. Reportedly, Facebook consulted with the National PTA and several academics before introducing the app. Messenger Kids is a separate service, so children using it can't be found using Facebook's search mechanism.

The letter from health professionals to Facebook also addressed safety concerns:

"Facebook claims that Messenger Kids will provide a safe alternative for the children who have lied their way onto social media platforms designed for teens and adults. But the 11- and 12-year-olds who currently use Snapchat, Instagram, or Facebook are unlikely to switch to an app that is clearly designed for younger children. Messenger Kids is not responding to a need – it is creating one. It appeals primarily to children who otherwise would not have their own social media accounts. It is disingenuous to use Facebook’s failure to keep underage users off their platforms as a rationale for targeting younger children with a new product."

Earlier this month, Facebook's CEO acknowledged problems and promised to do better. We shall see if Facebook's management listens to the documented concerns of pediatricians and health professionals.

What are your opinions about children ages 6 to 13 using social media? About Messenger Kids? Should Facebook terminate Messenger Kids?

Facebook-messenger-kids-how-to


Fitness Device Usage By U.S. Soldiers Reveal Sensitive Location And Movement Data

Useful technology can often have unintended consequences. The Washington Post reported about an interactive map:

"... posted on the Internet that shows the whereabouts of people who use fitness devices such as Fitbit also reveals highly sensitive information about the locations and activities of soldiers at U.S. military bases, in what appears to be a major security oversight. The Global Heat Map, published by the GPS tracking company Strava, uses satellite information to map the locations and movements of subscribers to the company’s fitness service over a two-year period, by illuminating areas of activity. Strava says it has 27 million users around the world, including people who own widely available fitness devices such as Fitbit and Jawbone, as well as people who directly subscribe to its mobile app. The map is not live — rather, it shows a pattern of accumulated activity between 2015 and September 2017... The U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State said on Monday it is revising its guidelines on the use of all wireless and technological devices on military facilities as a result of the revelations. "

Takeaway #1: it's easier than you might think for the bad guys to track the locations and movements of high-value targets (e.g, soldiers, corporate executives, politicians, attorneys).

Takeaway #2: unintended consequences from mobile devices is not new, as CNN reported in 2015. Consumers love the convenience of their digital devices. It is wise to remember the warning from a famous economist, "There's no such thing as a free lunch."


Burger King's Whopper Neutrality Ad. Sincere 'Net Neutrality' Support Or Slick Corporate Advertising?

If you haven't seen it, there is a Whopper Neutrality ad online by Burger King, explains net neutrality in a very easy-to-understand way. Blog post continues after the video:

A November, 2017 poll found that 52 percent of registered voters supported the current rules, including 55 percent of Democrats and 53 percent of Republicans. After that poll, the Commissioners at the FCC voted to killed net neutrality protections for consumers.

Some have questions whether the ad is sincere support of an issue consumers care about, or slick corporate advertising which capitalize on a hot topic. I like the ad. Anything that helps more consumers understand the issue, and what we've lost, is a good thing.

Another view of the ad by The Young Turks. Share your opinions below after the video:

Related posts about net neutrality:


The United States Has A Problem: Declining Foreign Visitors

Visit-usa-coalition-figure1
The United States has a problem: the number of international visitors is declining. What are companies doing to counter this, lost revenues, and other negative impacts? Bloomberg reported (bold emphasis added):

"... 10 business associations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Restaurant Association, have created a travel industry group aimed at reversing the growing unpopularity of the U.S. as a vacation destination. So [last week], some of its biggest players unveiled the "Visit U.S. Coalition" to spur the Trump administration into enacting friendlier visa and border-security policies at a time when federal agencies are doing the opposite... Since 2015, the U.S. and Turkey have been the only places among the top dozen global travel destinations to experience a decline in inbound visitors, a time when other nations such as Australia, Canada, China and the United Kingdom have marked sizable gains..."

Visit-usa-coaltion-figure3Foreign visitors spend their travel money here, which helps businesses in the USA. The amount of the travel decline is measurable:

"... the Commerce Department reported a 3.3 percent drop in traveler spending for last year, through November, the equivalent of $4.6 billion in losses and 40,000 jobs. The U.S. share of international long-haul travel fell to 11.9 percent last year, from 13.6 percent in 2015, according to the U.S. Travel Association, a slippage the group said equates to 7.4 million visitors and $32.2 billion in spending."

According to its website, the Visit U.S. Coalition includes the following founding members: American Gaming Association, American Hotel & Lodging Association, American Society of Association Executives, Asian American Hotel Owners Association, International Association of Exhibitions and Events, National Restaurant Association, National Retail Federation, Society of Independent Show Organizers, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the U.S. Travel Association.

What does this mean? What might the consequences be?

First, if the foreign tourism decline continues, experience tells us that after prolonged revenue losses, affected industries (e.g., hotels, transportation, restaurants, retail shopping, etc.) and companies will layoff or terminate workers. Not good for workers. Not good for the United States economy.

Second, it's great that several companies have organized together into groups... trade associations for several industries; and then several trade associations organized into a coalition... what you might call an uber-trade association... to highlight their concerns, remain competitive, and advocate for their interests. You'd expect any administration which promised to be pro-business would listen these concerns.

Third, the freedom to organize is an important part of a democracy, and a competitive marketplace. Workers want this freedom, too. Sadly, too many corporate executives and politicians deny workers the same freedoms they want their businesses to enjoy. You've probably heard the claim: "corporations are people, my friend." I guess they are a special class of people with more freedom than flesh-and-blood persons.

What do you think of the foreign visitor travel decline?


Royal Caribbean Cruise Line And CPP-The Myers-Briggs Offer Travel Personality Quiz

Inc. Magazine warned in 2016, "ready or not, companies will soon be tracking your emotions." Most Facebook users already knows this. Also in 2016, the social networking site expanded several reaction buttons beyond its (in)famous "Like" button to cover several emotions (e.g., "Love," "Haha," "Wow," "Sad," "Angry"):

Facebook-emotions-buttons

Maybe you have used these reaction buttons. Companies do this because effective marketing appeals to emotions instead of reason.

Now, a popular cruise line has taken things a step further. Cruise Critic, a popular travel site, announced:

"... Royal Caribbean has teamed up with CPP-The Myers-Briggs Company to launch a quiz that offers cruise recommendations based on your personality type. The assessment tool, found on MyAdventurePersonality.com, asks users 13 questions as they pertain to personal behavior and preferences... Once the results are calculated, users will be designated a travel personality type, such as Expert Adventure Planner, Laidback Wanderer and Spontaneous Sightseer. They also will receive an itinerary recommendation best suited for their type, with planning tips."

What is the Myers'Briggs assessment tool? The Myers-Briggs Foundation site explains:

"The purpose of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) personality inventory is to make the theory of psychological types described by C. G. Jung understandable and useful in people's lives. The essence of the theory is that much seemingly random variation in the behavior is actually quite orderly and consistent, being due to basic differences in the ways individuals prefer to use their perception and judgment... In developing the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator [instrument], the aim of Isabel Briggs Myers, and her mother, Katharine Briggs, was to make the insights of type theory accessible to individuals and groups... The identification of basic preferences of each of the four dichotomies specified or implicit in Jung's theory. The identification and description of the 16 distinctive personality types that result from the interactions among the preferences."

Indeed, this assessment tool became very accessible. The Seattle Times reported in 2013:

"Chances are you’ve taken the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), or will. Roughly 2 million people a year do. It has become the gold standard of psychological assessments, used in businesses, government agencies and educational institutions... More than 10,000 companies, 2,500 colleges and universities and 200 government agencies in the United States use the test... It’s estimated that 50 million people have taken the Myers-Briggs personality test since the Educational Testing Service first added the research to its portfolio in 1962... Organizations administer the MBTI assessment to employees in one of two ways. They either pay for someone in their human-resources department to become certified, then pay the materials costs each time employees take the test. Or, they contract with certified, independent training consultants or leadership coaches."

Selected questions from the MyAdventurePersonality site. Click to view larger version The travel quiz uses different and fewer (13 versus ~ 88) forced-choice questions than the MBTI. Plus, the travel quiz categorizes consumers into four travel personality types (versus 16 types by the MBTI). And, the MBTI tool is administered by certified professionals in an ethical manner. So, consumers shouldn't assume that the travel quiz is as rigorous as the MBTI. Admittedly, MyAdventurePersonality may add more questions and/or types in the future.

If you are considering the travel quiz, wise consumers always read the fine print, first. The MyAdventurePersonality site uses the same legal and privacy policies as the core Royal Caribbean cruise line site. So, consumers should know that whatever they submit to the travel quiz will probably be freely shared with other entities, since the Royal Caribbean Privacy Policy does not state any limitations.

The MyAdventurePersonality site may be a marketing gimmick to attract new customers and/or better target e-mail marketing campaigns to current and prospective cruise travelers.

Me? After 28 cruise ship vacations (with many on Royal Caribbean ships) to many areas of the planet, I know my travel needs and preferences very well. So, I doubt the quiz will tell me something I don't already know.

What do you think? Should companies uses these types of quizzes?


Citigroup Promises To Close Pay Gaps For Female And Minority Workers

Logo-citigroupUSA Today reported that Citigroup:

"... will boost job compensation for women and minorities in a bid to close pay gaps in the U.S., United Kingdom, and Germany, becoming the first U.S. bank to respond to shareholder pressure about the inequalities. The New York-based financial company announced the effort Monday, saying it came after a Citigroup compensation assessment in the three countries found that women on average were paid 99% of what men got and minorities on average received 99% of what non-minorities were paid... Citigroup's action prompted investment advisory company Arjuna Capital to withdraw the 2018 gender pay shareholder proposal it had filed in an effort to force an investor vote that would require the bank to address pay inequality."

So, the bank made changes only after a major investor forced it to. The news report cited other banks (text links added):

"No other U.S. bank has taken similar action, Arjuna said. Along with Citigroup, Arjuna said it had filed gender pay shareholder proposals this year with U.S. banks JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Bank of New York Mellon. The investment adviser said it had filed similar proposals with American Express, Mastercard, Reinsurance Group, and Progressive Insurance. If approved by shareholders, the proposals would require the companies to publish their policies and goals to reduce gender pay gaps."

JP Morgan Chase promised in 2016 to raise the pay of 18,000 tellers and branch workers. It seems that the banking industry, kicking and screaming, has been forced to confront its pay-gap issues for employees. What do you think?


Uber's Ripley Program To Thwart Law Enforcement

Uber logo Uber is in the news again, and not in a good way. TechCrunch reported:

"Between spring 2015 until late 2016 the ride-hailing giant routinely used a system designed to thwart police raids in foreign countries, according to Bloomberg, citing three people with knowledge of the system. It reports that Uber’s San Francisco office used the protocol — which apparently came to be referred to internally as ‘Ripley’ — at least two dozen times. The system enabled staff to remotely change passwords and “otherwise lock up data on company-owned smartphones, laptops, and desktops as well as shut down the devices”, it reports. We’ve also been told — via our own sources — about multiple programs at Uber intended to prevent company data from being accessed by oversight authorities... according to Bloomberg Uber created the system in response to raids on its offices in Europe: Specifically following a March 2015 raid on its Brussel’s office in which police gained access to its payments system and financial documents as well as driver and employee information; and after a raid on its Paris office in the same week."

In November of last year, reports emerged that the popular ride-sharing service experienced a data breach affecting 57 million users. Regulators said then that Uber tried to cover it up.

In March of last year, reports surfaced about Greyball, a worldwide program within Uber to thwart code enforcement inspections by governments. TechCrunch also described uLocker:

"We’ve also heard of the existence of a program at Uber called uLocker, although one source with knowledge of the program told us that the intention was to utilize a ransomware cryptolocker exploit and randomize the tokens — with the idea being that if Uber got raided it would cryptolocker its own devices in order to render data inaccessible to oversight authorities. The source said uLocker was being written in-house by Uber’s eng-sec and Marketplace Analytics divisions..."

Geez. First Greyball. Then Reipley and uLocker. And these are the known programs. This raises the question: how many programs are there?

Earlier today, Wired reported:

"The engineer at the heart of the upcoming Waymo vs Uber trial is facing dramatic new allegations of commercial wrongdoing, this time from a former nanny. Erika Wong, who says she cared for Anthony Levandowski’s two children from December 2016 to June 2017, filed a lawsuit in California this month accusing him of breaking a long list of employment laws. The complaint alleges the failure to pay wages, labor and health code violations... In her complaint, Wong alleges that Levandowski was paying a Tesla engineer for updates on its electric truck program, selling microchips abroad, and creating new startups using stolen trade secrets. Her complaint also describes Levandowski reacting to the arrival of the Waymo lawsuit against Uber, strategizing with then-Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, and discussing fleeing to Canada to escape prosecution... Levandowski’s outside dealings while employed at Google and Uber have been central themes in Waymo’s trade secrets case. Waymo says that Levandowski took 14,000 technical files related to laser-ranging lidar and other self-driving technologies with him when he left Google to work at Uber..."

Is this a corporation or organized crime? It seems difficult to tell the difference. What do you think?


GoPro Lays Off Workers And Exits Drone Business

Gopro-karma-drone

TechCrunch reported that GoPro, the mobile digital camera maker:

"... plans to reduce its headcount in 2018 from 1,254 employees to fewer than 1,000. It also plans to exit the drone market and reduce CEO 2018 compensation to $1... Last week TechCrunch reported exclusively on the firings with sources telling us several hundred employees were relieved of duties though officially kept on the books until the middle of February. We were told that the bulk of the layoffs happened in the engineering department of the Karma drone... Though GoPro is clearly done producing the Karma drone, it says it intends to continue to provide service and support to Karma customers."

Reported, the earnings announcement by GoPro expected fourth quarter revenues of $340 million, down 37% from 2016. At press time, the "Shop Now" button for Karma drones was still active. It seems the company is selling off its remaining drone inventory.


Google Photos: Still Blind After All These Years

Earlier today, Wired reported:

"In 2015, a black software developer embarrassed Google by tweeting that the company’s Photos service had labeled photos of him with a black friend as "gorillas." Google declared itself "appalled and genuinely sorry." An engineer who became the public face of the clean-up operation said the label gorilla would no longer be applied to groups of images, and that Google was "working on longer-term fixes."

More than two years later, one of those fixes is erasing gorillas, and some other primates, from the service’s lexicon. The awkward workaround illustrates the difficulties Google and other tech companies face in advancing image-recognition technology... WIRED tested Google Photos using a collection of 40,000 images well-stocked with animals. It performed impressively at finding many creatures, including pandas and poodles. But the service reported "no results" for the search terms "gorilla," "chimp," "chimpanzee," and "monkey."

This is the best facial-recognition software solution Google can do, while it also wants consumers to trust the software in its driver-less vehicles? Geez. #fubar Well, maybe this video will help Google engineers feel better:


Telecoms Fired Workers After Lobbying For, And Getting, Tax Cuts And Net Neutrality Repeal

Comcast logo Last week, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported:

"Managers, supervisors, and direct sales people in Chicago, Florida, and other parts of Comcast’s Central region, mostly in the Midwest and Southeastern United States, were terminated around Dec. 15... More than 500 sales employees were terminated, company sources said... Comcast has not reorganized the direct sales forces and approach in the company’s two other big divisions, which include Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Comcast/NBCUniversal employs about 159,000.

In late December, Comcast announced that it would hand out $1,000 bonuses to full-time employees, in response to the Trump tax cut that will slash its corporate tax rate. The fired employees will be eligible for a “$1,000 supplemental severance payment,” Comcast said... Comcast direct sales employees earned $50,000 to $100,000 through a low base salary and commissions, the terminated employee said. The commissions ranged between roughly $75 for a new Internet Plus customer to $350 for a new customer who ordered a triple-play package with home security, the former employee said. Internet Plus is a package of television and broadband services..."

Reportedly, fired employees received severance pay only if they accepted non-disclosure agreements. Also, Comcast fired about 405 workers in Georgia.

Context matters. Earlier this week, Vox reported in December before the tax bill was passed:

"... the prospect for a deal on tax reform looking promising, lobbying reached a pinnacle this year, with 2,065 groups pushing their cause, according to reports published by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. The efforts are employing more than 6,000 lobbyists, the nonpartisan Public Citizen counted. The four organizations that reported the most lobbying activity on tax issues so far this year are Fortune 500 companies with a huge stake in the outcome: Comcast, Microsoft, Altria Group (formerly Philip Morris), and NextEra Energy."

Many politicians have repeated claims that tax cuts will create new jobs, and that repeal of net neutrality rules would encourage investment by ISPs. And, after the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in December to repeal existing net neutrality rules, Comcast issued this statement:

"We commend Chairman Pai for his leadership and FCC Commissioners O’Reilly and Carr for their support in adopting the Restoring Internet Freedom Order, returning to a regulatory environment that allowed the Internet to thrive for decades by eliminating burdensome Title II regulations and opening the door for increased investment and digital innovation. Today’s action does not mark the ‘end of the Internet as we know it;’ rather it heralds in a new era of light regulation that will benefit consumers."

So, let's summarize events. After receiving two huge benefits (e.g., tax cuts, repeal of net neutrality rules), Comcast immediately terminated workers. Ars Technica asked Comcast why they fired workers when tax cuts were supposed to create new jobs:

"... Comcast gave us this statement but offered no further details: "Periodically, we reorganize groups of employees and adjust our sales tactics and talent. This change in the Central Division is an example of this practice and occurred in the context of our adding hundreds of frontline and sales employees. All these employees were offered generous severance and an opportunity to apply for other jobs at Comcast." "

One of the claims by corporate ISPs and by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has been that net neutrality rules killed infrastructure investments by telecoms. Ars analyzed this claim:

"The firings happened around December 15. On December 20, Comcast announced that, because of the pending tax cut and recent repeal of net neutrality rules, it would give "special bonuses" of $1,000 to more than 100,000 employees and invest more than $50 billion in infrastructure over the next five years. "With these investments, we expect to add thousands of new direct and indirect jobs," Comcast said at the time.

We examined Comcast's investment claims in an article on December 21. As it turns out, Comcast's annual investments already soared during the two-plus years that net neutrality rules were on the books, and the $50 billion amount could be achieved if those investments simply continued increasing by a modest amount."

AT&T logo So, a few workers received bigger bonuses while others lost their jobs. And, it is worse. AT&T fired about 700 workers after promising to increase investments by $1 billion of Congress passed the tax cuts bill. Congress did, and AT&T didn't wait to terminate workers.

One can conclude:

  1.  The investment claims, by ISPs and advocates of repealing net neutrality rules, were bogus,
  2. Voters either didn't pay attention or were duped by claims that net neutrality rules killed investments by telecoms,
  3. Voters were duped during the 2016 election into believing claims that tax cuts would create jobs,
  4. Voters accepted these job-creation promises without demanding any guarantees, and
  5. Tax cuts are being used to reward employees and managers with bigger bonuses.

The bigger bonuses are great, if you have a job. Regardless, we now see the results: tax cuts help companies and fewer jobs hurt workers. Repeal of net neutrality rules will hurt public libraries, the poor, and disabled persons. And, there's more to come as ISPs roll out their revised broadband services (with higher prices) without net neutrality rules.

Yes, this stinks. What do you think? Is this what you expected?


U.S. Senate Moves Closer To Vote On Net Neutrality

Yesterday, The Hill reported:

"A Senate bill that would reverse the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) decision to repeal net neutrality received its 30th co-sponsor on Monday, ensuring it will receive a vote on the Senate floor. Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) announced her support for the bill on Twitter, putting it over the top of a procedural requirement to bypass committee approval.

The bill, which is being pushed by Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.), would use Congress’s authority under the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to reverse the FCC’s rollback of its popular net neutrality rules... Under the CRA, if a joint resolution of disapproval bill has enough support it can bypass committee review and be fast-tracked to a floor vote... Lawmakers have 60 legislative days after the FCC submits its regulations to Congress to pass the CRA. The repeal order is currently awaiting approval from the Office of Management and Budget.

With Republicans in control of both the House and Senate, the bill faces long odds to win the simple majorities it needs to reach the president’s desk."


Facebook CEO Admits His Social Service Has Problems, And Promises To Do Better In 2018

Facebook logo Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO at Facebook, recently admitted that his social networking service has problems. And, he promised to do better in 2018. The article is important since it highlights the issues causing concerns for Mr. Zuckerberg. The Independent UK reported:

"Each year, the Facebook boss takes on a challenge to complete over the year. For 2018, he has promised to try and fix his company... He said that he had made the decision to concentrate on his own company this year because the world was so divided and he thinks he will "learn more by focusing intensely on these issues..." "

Huh? What else was he focused on instead? You'd think that he'd be focused 24/7/365 on a service with 23,265 employees and 2 billion monthly users worldwide.

The report by the Independent UK also described for Mr. Zuckerberg's concerns, which have implications for everyone:

"... Facebook has been blamed for helping spread hatred and division in the wake of the [2016 U.S.] election, as well as potentially helping with the spread of fake news that allowed it to tip in Donald Trump's favour. Even the site itself has admitted that it can be upsetting and disruptive for those who use it, in a press release that said using the site might be bad for you... He pointed to the fact that the rise of tech companies like Facebook and their increasing power over the internet meant that the internet was becoming centralized in a few powerful hands. He pointed to other technologies like crypto-currency as challenges to that, but said that overall people had "lost faith" in the power of the internet to decentralize things.

A number of complaints have pointed at Facebook's unprecedented power over the way the internet works as a danger. Facebook's ability to control much of the news people read has been blamed for the spread of fake reporting, for instance, and projects like Facebook's Free Basics tools have been blamed for undermining net neutrality. But many of those same projects have been attempts by Facebook to grow its user base... He said he would look at using new technologies – encryption as well as cryptocurrency – to help improve Facebook and the internet by allowing it to stop being controlled by just a few people..."

Regular readers of this blog are aware of the problems, many of which were discussed in prior posts:

Will Mr. Zuckerberg and his senior management team fix these problems? Can they? Some of the ad-targeting mechanisms (that create abuses) have been around for years. Given its history, the cynic in me thinks that Facebook can only get better. Will Facebook do better in 2018? Tell us what you think.


Smart Lock Maker Suspends Operations

Otto, a smart lock maker, has suspended operations. Sam Jadallah, the firm's CEO, announced the suspension just before the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). TechCrunch reported:

"The company made the decision just ahead of the holidays, a fact that founder and CEO Sam Jadallah recently made public with a lengthy Medium post now pinned to the top of the startup’s site... Jadallah told TechCrunch that the company’s lock made it as far as the manufacturing process, and is currently sitting in a warehouse, unable to be sold by a hardware startup that is effectively no longer operating... The long and short of it is that the company was about to be acquired by someone with a lot more resources and experience in bringing a product to market, only to have the rug apparently pulled out at the last minute..."

The digital door lock market includes a variety of types and technologies, such as biometrics, face recognition, iris recognition, palm recognition, voice recognition, fingerprint recognition, keypad locks, and magnetic stripe locks. Consumer Reports rated bothh door locks and smart locks.

Several digital locks are available at online retail sites, including products by August, Brilong, Kwikset, Samsung, and several other makers.


Report: Air Travel Globally During 2017 Was The Safest Year On Record

The Independent UK newspaper reported:

"The Dutch-based aviation consultancy, To70, has released its Civil Aviation Safety Review for 2017. It reports only two fatal accidents, both involving small turbo-prop aircraft, with a total of 13 lives lost. No jets crashed in passenger service anywhere in the world... The chances of a plane being involved in a fatal accident is now one in 16 million, according to the lead researcher, Adrian Young... The report warns that electronic devices in checked-in bags pose a growing potential danger: “The increasing use of lithium-ion batteries in electronics creates a fire risk on board aeroplanes as such batteries are difficult to extinguish if they catch fire... The UK has the best air-safety record of any major country. No fatal accidents involving a British airline have happened since the 1980s. The last was on 10 January 1989... In contrast, sub-Saharan Africa has an accident rate 44 per cent worse than the global average, according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA)..."

Read the full 2017 aviation safety report by To70. Below is a chart from the report.

Accident Data Chart from To70 Air Safety Review for 2017. Click to view larger version