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Advertising Agency Paid $2 Million To Settle Deceptive Advertising Charges

Marketing Architects inc. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that Minneapolis-based Marketing Architects, Inc. (MAI):

"... an advertising agency that created and disseminated allegedly deceptive radio ads for weight-loss products marketed by its client, Direct Alternatives, has agreed to pay $2 million to the Federal Trade Commission and State of Maine Attorney General’s Office to settle their complaint..."

First, some background. According to the FTC, MAI created advertising for several products (e.g., Puranol, Pur-Hoodia Plus, Acai Fresh, AF Plus, and Final Trim) by Direct Alternatives from 2006 through February 2015. Then, in 2016 the FTC and the State of Maine settled allegations against Direct Alternatives, which required the company to halt deceptive advertising and illegal billing practices.

Additional background according to the FTC: MAI previously created weight-loss ads for Sensa Products, LLC between March 2009 and May 2011. The FTC filed a complaint against Sensa in 2014, and subsequently Sensa agreed to refund $26.5 million to defrauded consumers. So, there's important, relevant history.

In the latest action, the joint complaint alleged that MAI created and disseminated radio ads with false or unsubstantiated weight-loss claims for AF Plus and Final Trim. Besides:

"... receiving FTC’s Sensa order, MAI was previously made aware of the need to have competent and reliable scientific evidence to back up health claims. Among other things, the complaint alleges that Direct Alternatives provided MAI with documents indicating that some of the weight-loss claims later challenged by the FTC needed to be supported by scientific evidence.

The complaint further charges that MAI developed and disseminated fictitious weight-loss testimonials and created radio ads for weight-loss products falsely disguised as news stories. Finally, the complaint charges MAI with creating inbound call scripts that failed to adequately disclose that consumers would be automatically enrolled in negative-option (auto-ship) continuity plans."

The latest action includes a proposed court order to ban MAI from making weight-loss claims about products the FTC has already advised as false, and:

"... requires MAI to have competent and reliable scientific evidence to support any other claims about the health benefits or efficacy of weight-loss products, and prohibits it from misrepresenting the existence or outcome of tests or studies. In addition, the order prohibits MAI from misrepresenting the experience of consumer testimonialists or that paid commercial advertising is independent programming."

This action is a reminder to advertising and digital agency executives everywhere: ensure that claims are supported by competent, reliable scientific evidence.

Good. Kudos to the FTC for these enforcement actions and for protecting consumers.

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