Facebook’s Experiment in Ad Transparency Is Like Playing Hide And Seek
I Approved This Facebook Message — But You Don’t Know That

Unilever To Social Networking Sites: Drain The Online Swamp Or Lose Business

Unilever logo Unilever has placed tech companies and social networking sites on notice... chiefly Facebook and Google. Adweek reported:

"Unilever CMO Keith Weed put the advertising community on notice Monday during a keynote speech at the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s Annual Leadership Meeting in Palm Desert, Calif. Weed called for tech platforms—namely Facebook and YouTube—to step up their efforts in combating divisive content, hate speech and fake news. “I don’t think for a second where the internet right now is how the platforms dreamt it would be,” Weed told Adweek in an interview at the event."

After promising promised to improve the transparency of advertising on its platform, Facebook's program hasn't proceeded smoothly. Unilever spends about $9 billion annually in advertising, with more than 140 brands globally -- all spanning several categories including food and drink (e.g., Ben & Jerry's, Breyers, Country Crock, Hellmann's, Mazola, Knorr, Lipton, Promise), home care, and personal care products (e.g., Axe, Caress, Degree, Dove, Sunsilk, TRESemme, Vaseline). Adweek also reported:

"Much like Procter & Gamble CMO Marc Pritchard—who spoke at the IAB’s 2017 event and outlined a multipronged, yearlong plan—Weed is looking to pressure tech companies to increase their resources on cleaning up the platforms..."

BBC News reported:

"Unilever has pledged to: a) Not invest in platforms that do not protect children or create division in society; b) Only invest in platforms that make a positive contribution to society; c) Tackle gender stereotypes in advertising; and d) Only partner with companies creating a responsible digital infrastructure... At the World Economic Forum in Davos last month Prime Minister Theresa May called on investors to put pressure on tech firms to tackle the problem much more quickly. In December, the European Commission warned the likes of Facebook, Google, YouTube, Twitter and other firms that it was considering legislation if self-regulation continued to fail."

That's great. It'll be interesting to see which, if any other corporate marketers, make pledges similar to Unilever's. Susan Wojcicki, the CEO of Google's YouTube, issued a brief response. MediaPost reported:

"We want to do the right set of things to build [Unilever’s] trust. They are building brands on YouTube, and we want to be sure that our brand is the right place to build their brand."She added that "based on the feedback we had from them," YouTube changed its rules for what channels could be monetized, and began to have humans review all videos uploaded to Google Preferred..."

In December 2017, Youtube pledged a staff of 10,000 to root out divisive video content in 2018. We'll see if tech companies meet their promises. Consumers don't want to wade through social sites filled with divisive, hate, and fake-news content.

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