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Federal Regulators Assess $1 Billion Fine Against Wells Fargo Bank

On Friday, several federal regulators announced the assessment of a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo Bank for violations of the, "Consumer Financial Protection Act (CFPA) in the way it administered a mandatory insurance program related to its auto loans..."

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau logo The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced the fine and settlement with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., and its coordinated action with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). The announcement stated that the CFPB:

"... also found that Wells Fargo violated the CFPA in how it charged certain borrowers for mortgage interest rate-lock extensions. Under the terms of the consent orders, Wells Fargo will remediate harmed consumers and undertake certain activities related to its risk management and compliance management. The CFPB assessed a $1 billion penalty against the bank and credited the $500 million penalty collected by the OCC toward the satisfaction of its fine."

Wells Fargo logo This not the first fine against Wells Fargo. The bank paid a $185 million fine in 2016 to settle charges about for alleged unlawful sales practices during the past five years. To game an internal sales system, employees allegedly created about 1.5 million bogus email accounts, and both issued and activated debit cards associated with the secret accounts. Then, employees also created PIN numbers for the accounts, all without customers' knowledge nor consent. An investigation in 2017 found millions more bogus accounts created than originally found in 2016. Also in 2017, irregularities were reported about how the bank handled mortgages.

The OCC explained that it took action:

"... given the severity of the deficiencies and violations of law, the financial harm to consumers, and the bank’s failure to correct the deficiencies and violations in a timely manner. The OCC found deficiencies in the bank’s enterprise-wide compliance risk management program that constituted reckless, unsafe, or unsound practices and resulted in violations of the unfair practices prong of Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Act. In addition, the agency found the bank violated the FTC Act and engaged in unsafe and unsound practices relating to improper placement and maintenance of collateral protection insurance policies on auto loan accounts and improper fees associated with interest rate lock extensions. These practices resulted in consumer harm which the OCC has directed the bank to remediate.

The $500 million civil money penalty reflects a number of factors, including the bank’s failure to develop and implement an effective enterprise risk management program to detect and prevent the unsafe or unsound practices, and the scope and duration of the practices..."

MarketWatch explained the bank's unfair and unsound practices:

"When consumers buy a vehicle through a lender, the lender often requires the consumer to also purchase “collateral protection insurance.” That means the vehicle itself is collateral — or essentially, could be repossessed — if the loan is not paid... Sometimes, the fine print of the contracts say that if borrowers do not buy their own insurance (enough to satisfy the terms of the loan), the lender will go out and purchase that insurance on their behalf, and charge them for it... That is a legal practice. But in the case of Wells Fargo, borrowers said they actually did buy that insurance, and Wells Fargo still bought more insurance on their behalf and charged them for it."

So, the bank forced consumers to buy unwanted and unnecessary auto insurance. The lesson for consumers: don't accept the first auto loan offered, and closely read the fine print of contracts from lenders. Wells Fargo said in a news release that it:

"... will adjust its first quarter 2018 preliminary financial results by an additional accrual of $800 million, which is not tax deductible. The accrual reduces reported first quarter 2018 net income by $800 million, or $0.16 cents per diluted common share, to $4.7 billion, or 96 cents per diluted common share. Under the consent orders, Wells Fargo will also be required to submit, for review by its board, plans detailing its ongoing efforts to strengthen its compliance and risk management, and its approach to customer remediation efforts."

Kudos to the OCC and CFPB for taking this action against a bank with a spotty history. Will executives at Wells Fargo learn their lessons from the massive fine? The Washington Post reported that the bank will:

"... benefit from a massive corporate tax cut passed by Congress last year. he bank’s effective tax rate this year will fall from about 33 percent to 22 percent, according to a Goldman Sachs analysis released in December. The change could boost its profits by 18 percent, according to the analysis. Just in the first quarter, Wells Fargo’s effective tax rate fell from about 28 percent to 18 percent, saving it more than $600 million. For the entire year, the tax cut is expected to boost the company’s profits by $3.7 billion..."

So, don't worry about the bank. It's tax savings will easily offset the fine. This makes one doubt the fine was a sufficient deterrent. And, I found the OCC's announcement forceful and appropriate, while the CFPB's announcement seemed to soft-pedal things by saying the absolute minimum.

What do you think? Will the fine curb executive wrongdoing?

Comments

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Chanson de Roland

This isn’t hardly enough, nor is it effective as a deterrent or in remedying the perverted corporate culture at Wells Fargo. Though it sounds like a big number, as the Editor reports, supra, the billion dollar fine against Wells Fargo really doesn’t amount to much. Wells Fargo will easily be able to pay that fine out of the Trump-Republican tax cuts. What’s need are criminal sanctions of two types: First, there should be criminal sanctions against employees and officials at Wells Fargo that sound in the nature of or conspiracy to commit fraud, theft, embezzlement, intentional violation of fiduciary duty, larceny by trick, and all other appropriate crimes. Those crimes agains people would be for punishment, deterrence, and to help those victims of Wells Fargo’s misconduct to recover their losses and be made whole.

Second, Wells Fargo itself should be indicted for some or all of the foregoing crimes and for RICO, that is, Wells Fargo should be indicted for being a criminal enterprise, a significant purpose of which was to commit and further crime, for that is what it appeared to certainly have been. But the goal of indicting and convicting Wells Fargo wouldn’t be punishment, nor would any sane judge look to windup Wells Fargo. The goal here would be to use the court’s broad power as a chancellor in equity to appoint and empower its special master to reform Wells Fargo’s management, business practices, and culture so as to make it a profitable yet law abiding enterprise, which it clearly was not.

The fines and token remedies dispensed so far do nothing to deter others from committing crime and do little to reform Wells Fargo and, thus, leaves reforming Wells Fargo to a board of directors who have already failed to manage Wells Fargo to be even law abiding, much less ethical.

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