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More Consequences From The Phony-Accounts Scandal At Wells Fargo Bank

Wells Fargo logo Consequences continue after the bank's phony-accounts scandal. Last week, Well Fargo announced several changes in senior management:

"Chief Administrative Officer Hope Hardison and Chief Auditor David Julian have begun leaves of absence from Wells Fargo and will no longer be members of the company’s Operating Committee. These leaves relate to previously disclosed ongoing reviews by regulatory agencies in connection with historical retail banking sales practices. These leaves of absence are unrelated to the company’s reported financial results..."

An investigation in 2017 found a new total of 3.5 million phony consumer and small business accounts set up by employees trying to game an internal sales compensation system. The phony accounts, many of which incurred fees and charges, had been set up without customers' knowledge nor approval. In a settlement agreement in 2016 with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Wells Fargo paid a $185 million fine last year for alleged unlawful sales practices with 1.5 million phony accounts known at that time. In 2016, about 5,300 mostly lower-level employees had been fired as a result of the scandal.

The latest announcement listed more executive changes:

"David Galloreese continues as head of Human Resources and will report directly to CEO and President Tim Sloan and join the Operating Committee. Cara Peck, who heads the Culture and Change Management teams, will report directly to Galloreese.

Jim Rowe continues as head of Stakeholder Relations and will report directly to Sloan. Stakeholder Relations will expand to include Corporate Philanthropy and Community Relations, headed by Jon Campbell... Kimberly Bordner, currently executive audit director, will become the company’s acting Chief Auditor..."

The bank is conducting an executive search for a new Chief Auditor.

Executives at the bank have plenty to fix. In April, federal regulators assessed a $1 billion fine against the bank for violations of the Consumer Financial Protection Act (CFPA) in the way it administered mandatory insurance for auto loans. In August, reports surfaced that the bank had accidentally foreclosed on 400 homeowners it shouldn't have due to a software bug.

In June 2017, U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) called for the firing of all 12 board members at Wells Fargo bank for failing to adequately protect account holders. Let's hope these latest senior executive changes bring about needed changes.

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