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House Oversight Committee Report On The Equifax Data Breach. Did The Recommendations Go Far Enough?

On Monday, the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform released its report (Adobe PDF) on the massive Equifax data breach, where the most sensitive personal and payment information of more than 148 million consumers -- nearly half of the population -- was accessed and stolen. The report summary:

"In 2005, former Equifax Chief Executive Officer(CEO) Richard Smith embarked on an aggressive growth strategy, leading to the acquisition of multiple companies, information technology (IT) systems, and data. While the acquisition strategy was successful for Equifax’s bottom line and stock price, this growth brought increasing complexity to Equifax’s IT systems, and expanded data security risks... Equifax, however, failed to implement an adequate security program to protect this sensitive data. As a result, Equifax allowed one of the largest data breaches in U.S. history. Such a breach was entirely preventable."

The report cited several failures by Equifax. First:

"On March 7, 2017, a critical vulnerability in the Apache Struts software was publicly disclosed. Equifax used Apache Struts to run certain applications on legacy operating systems. The following day, the Department of Homeland Security alerted Equifax to this critical vulnerability. Equifax’s Global Threate and Vulnerability Management (GTVM) team emailed this alert to over 400 people on March 9, instructing anyone who had Apache Struts running on their system to apply the necessary patch within 48 hours. The Equifax GTVM team also held a March 16 meeting about this vulnerability. Equifax, however, did not fully patch its systems. Equifax’s Automated Consumer Interview System (ACIS), a custom-built internet-facing consumer dispute portal developed in the 1970s, was running a version of Apache Struts containing the vulnerability. Equifax did not patch the Apache Struts software located within ACIS, leaving its systems and data exposed."

As bad as that is, it gets worse:

"On May 13, 2017, attackers began a cyberattack on Equifax. The attack lasted for 76 days. The attackers dropped “web shells” (a web-based backdoor) to obtain remote control over Equifax’s network. They found a file containing unencrypted credentials (usernames and passwords), enabling the attackers to access sensitive data outside of the ACIS environment. The attackers were able to use these credentials to access 48 unrelated databases."

"Attackers sent 9,000 queries on these 48 databases, successfully locating unencrypted personally identifiable information (PII) data 265 times. The attackers transferred this data out of the Equifax environment, unbeknownst to Equifax. Equifax did not see the data exfiltration because the device used to monitor ACIS network traffic had been inactive for 19 months due to an expired security certificate. On July 29, 2017, Equifax updated the expired certificate and immediately noticed suspicious web traffic..."

Findings so far: 1) growth prioritized over security while archiving highly valuable data; 2) antiquated computer systems; 3) failed security patches; 4) unprotected user credentials; and 5) failed intrusion detection mechanism. Geez!

Only after updating its expired security certificate did Equifax notice the intrusion. After that, you'd think that Equifax would have implemented a strong post-breach response. You'd be wrong. More failures:

"When Equifax informed the public of the breach on September 7, the company was unprepared to support the large number of affected consumers. The dedicated breach website and call centers were immediately overwhelmed, and consumers were not able to obtain timely information about whether they were affected and how they could obtain identity protection services."

"Equifax should have addressed at least two points of failure to mitigate, or even prevent, this data breach. First, a lack of accountability and no clear lines of authority in Equifax’s IT management structure existed, leading to an execution gap between IT policy development and operation. This also restricted the company’s implementation of other security initiatives in a comprehensive and timely manner. As an example, Equifax had allowed over 300 security certificates to expire, including 79 certificates for monitoring business critical domains. "Second, Equifax’s aggressive growth strategy and accumulation of data resulted in a complex IT environment. Equifax ran a number of its most critical IT applications on custom-built legacy systems. Both the complexity and antiquated nature of Equifax’s IT systems made IT security especially challenging..."

Findings so far: 6) inadequate post-breach response; and 7) complicated IT structure making updates difficult. Geez!

The report listed the executives who retired and/or were fired. That's a small start for a company archiving the most sensitive personal and payment information of all USA citizens. The report included seven recommendations:

"1: Empower Consumers through Transparency. Consumer reporting agencies (CRAs) should provide more transparency to consumers on what data is collected and how it is used. A large amount of the public’s concern after Equifax’s data breach announcement stemmed from the lack of knowledge regarding the extensive data CRAs hold on individuals. CRAs must invest in and deploy additional tools to empower consumers to better control their own data..."

"2: Review Sufficiency of FTC Oversight and Enforcement Authorities. Currently, the FTC uses statutory authority under Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act to hold businesses accountable for making false or misleading claims about their data security or failing to employ reasonable security measures. Additional oversight authorities and enforcement tools may be needed to enable the FTC to effectively monitor CRA data security practices..."

"3: Review Effectiveness of Identity Monitoring and Protection Services Offered to Breach Victims. The General Accounting Office (GAO) should examine the effectiveness of current identity monitoring and protection services and provide recommendations to Congress. In particular, GAO should review the length of time that credit monitoring and protection services are needed after a data breach to mitigate identity theft risks. Equifax offered free credit monitoring and protection services for one year to any consumer who requested it... This GAO study would help clarify the value of credit monitoring services and the length of time such services should be maintained. The GAO study should examine alternatives to credit monitoring services and identify addit ional or complimentary services..."

"4: Increase Transparency of Cyber Risk in Private Sector. Federal agencies and the private sector should work together to increase transparency of a company’s cybersecurity risks and steps taken to mitigate such risks. One example of how a private entity can increase transparency related to the company’s cyber risk is by making disclosures in its Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings. In 2011, the SEC developed guidance to assist companies in disclosing cybersecurity risks and incidents. According to the SEC guidance, if cybersecurity risks or incidents are “sufficiently material to investors” a private company may be required to disclose the information... Equifax did not disclose any cybersecurity risks or cybers ecurity incidents in its SEC filings prior to the 2017 data breach..."

"5: Hold Federal Contractors Accountable for Cybersecurity with Clear Requirements. The Equifax data breach and federal customers’ use of Equifax identity validation services highlight the need for the federal government to be vigilant in mitigating cybersecurity risk in federal acquisition. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) should continue efforts to develop a clear set of requirements for federal contractors to address increasing cybersecurity risks, particularly as it relates to handling of PII. There should be a government-wide framework of cybersecurity and data security risk-based requirements. In 2016, the Committee urged OMB to focus on improving and updating cybersecurity requirements for federal acquisition... The Committee again urges OMB to expedite development of a long-promised cybersecurity acquisition memorandum to provide guidance to federal agencies and acquisition professionals..."

"6: Reduce Use of Social Security Numbers as Personal Identifiers. The executive branch should work with the private sector to reduce reliance on Social Security numbers. Social Security numbers are widely used by the public and private sector to both identify and authenticate individuals. Authenticators are only useful if they are kept confidential. Attackers stole the Social Security numbers of an estimated 145 million consumers from Equifax. As a result of this breach, nearly half of the country’s Social Security numbers are no longer confidential. To better protect consumers from identity theft, OMB and other relevant federal agencies should pursue emerging technology solutions as an alternative to Social Security number use."

"7: Implement Modernized IT Solutions. Companies storing sensitive consumer data should transition away from legacy IT and implement modern IT security solutions. Equifax failed to modernize its IT environments in a timely manner. The complexity of the legacy IT environment hosting the ACIS application allowed the attackers to move throughout the Equifax network... Equifax’s legacy IT was difficult to scan, patch, and modify... Private sector companies, especially those holding sensitive consumer data like Equifax, must prioritize investment in modernized tools and technologies...."

The history of corporate data breaches and the above list of corporate failures by Equifax both should be warnings to anyone in government promoting the privatization of current government activities. Companies screw up stuff, too.

Recommendation #6 is frightening in that it hasn't been implemented. Yikes! No federal agency should do business with a private sector firm operating with antiquated computer systems. And, if Equifax can't protect the information it archives, it should cease to exist. While that sounds harsh, it ain't. Continual data breaches place risks and burdens upon already burdened consumers trying to control and protect their data.

What are your opinions of the report? Did it go far enough?

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