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Google Fined 50 Million Euros For Violations Of New European Privacy Law

Google logo Google has been find 50 million Euros (about U.S. $57 million) under the new European privacy law for failing to properly disclose to users how their data is collected and used for targeted advertising. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulations, which went into effect in May 2018, give EU residents more control over their information and how companies use it.

After receiving two complaints last year from privacy-rights groups, France's National Data Protection Commission (CNL) announced earlier this month:

"... CNIL carried out online inspections in September 2018. The aim was to verify the compliance of the processing operations implemented by GOOGLE with the French Data Protection Act and the GDPR by analysing the browsing pattern of a user and the documents he or she can have access, when creating a GOOGLE account during the configuration of a mobile equipment using Android. On the basis of the inspections carried out, the CNIL’s restricted committee responsible for examining breaches of the Data Protection Act observed two types of breaches of the GDPR."

The first violation involved transparency failures:

"... information provided by GOOGLE is not easily accessible for users. Indeed, the general structure of the information chosen by the company does not enable to comply with the Regulation. Essential information, such as the data processing purposes, the data storage periods or the categories of personal data used for the ads personalization, are excessively disseminated across several documents, with buttons and links on which it is required to click to access complementary information. The relevant information is accessible after several steps only, implying sometimes up to 5 or 6 actions... some information is not always clear nor comprehensive. Users are not able to fully understand the extent of the processing operations carried out by GOOGLE. But the processing operations are particularly massive and intrusive because of the number of services offered (about twenty), the amount and the nature of the data processed and combined. The restricted committee observes in particular that the purposes of processing are described in a too generic and vague manner..."

So, important information is buried and scattered across several documents making it difficult for users to access and to understand. The second violation involved the legal basis for personalized ads processing:

"... GOOGLE states that it obtains the user’s consent to process data for ads personalization purposes. However, the restricted committee considers that the consent is not validly obtained for two reasons. First, the restricted committee observes that the users’ consent is not sufficiently informed. The information on processing operations for the ads personalization is diluted in several documents and does not enable the user to be aware of their extent. For example, in the section “Ads Personalization”, it is not possible to be aware of the plurality of services, websites and applications involved in these processing operations (Google search, Youtube, Google home, Google maps, Playstore, Google pictures, etc.) and therefore of the amount of data processed and combined."

"[Second], the restricted committee observes that the collected consent is neither “specific” nor “unambiguous.” When an account is created, the user can admittedly modify some options associated to the account by clicking on the button « More options », accessible above the button « Create Account ». It is notably possible to configure the display of personalized ads. That does not mean that the GDPR is respected. Indeed, the user not only has to click on the button “More options” to access the configuration, but the display of the ads personalization is moreover pre-ticked. However, as provided by the GDPR, consent is “unambiguous” only with a clear affirmative action from the user (by ticking a non-pre-ticked box for instance). Finally, before creating an account, the user is asked to tick the boxes « I agree to Google’s Terms of Service» and « I agree to the processing of my information as described above and further explained in the Privacy Policy» in order to create the account. Therefore, the user gives his or her consent in full, for all the processing operations purposes carried out by GOOGLE based on this consent (ads personalization, speech recognition, etc.). However, the GDPR provides that the consent is “specific” only if it is given distinctly for each purpose."

So, not only is important information buried and scattered across multiple documents (again), but also critical boxes for users to give consent are pre-checked when they shouldn't be.

CNIL explained its reasons for the massive fine:

"The amount decided, and the publicity of the fine, are justified by the severity of the infringements observed regarding the essential principles of the GDPR: transparency, information and consent. Despite the measures implemented by GOOGLE (documentation and configuration tools), the infringements observed deprive the users of essential guarantees regarding processing operations that can reveal important parts of their private life since they are based on a huge amount of data, a wide variety of services and almost unlimited possible combinations... Moreover, the violations are continuous breaches of the Regulation as they are still observed to date. It is not a one-off, time-limited, infringement..."

This is the largest fine, so far, under GDPR laws. Reportedly, Google will appeal the fine:

"We've worked hard to create a GDPR consent process for personalised ads that is as transparent and straightforward as possible, based on regulatory guidance and user experience testing... We're also concerned about the impact of this ruling on publishers, original content creators and tech companies in Europe and beyond... For all these reasons, we've now decided to appeal."

This is not the first EU fine for Google. CNet reported:

"Google is no stranger to fines under EU laws. It's currently awaiting the outcome of yet another antitrust investigation -- after already being slapped with a $5 billion fine last year for anticompetitive Android practices and a $2.7 billion fine in 2017 over Google Shopping."

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