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Two Data Breaches At Collections Vendor Used By Healthcare Testing Firms Affect About 19 Million Persons

Two healthcare data breaches have affected about 19 million persons, so far.

First, a data breach at a third-party collections firm has affected about 11.9 million patients at Quest Diagnostics, a medical testing firm. Quest announced in a June 3rd news release that American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA) notified it of data breach affecting Quest patients:

"... an unauthorized user had access to AMCA’s system...AMCA provides billing collections services to Optum360, which in turn is a Quest contractor. Quest and Optum360 are working with forensic experts to investigate the matter. AMCA first notified Quest and Optum360 on May 14, 2019 of potential unauthorized activity on AMCA’s web payment page. On May 31, 2019, AMCA notified Quest and Optum360 that the data on AMCA’s affected system included information regarding approximately 11.9 million Quest patients. AMCA believes this information includes personal information, including certain financial data, Social Security numbers, and medical information, but not laboratory test results."

Quest said that AMCA hasn't yet provided it with details about the data breach. The news release did not state when AMCA or Quest would directly notify affected patients. Hopefully, future news releases will provide dates when the breach occurred, how the attackers broke in, and the fixes underway so this doesn't happen again.

Second, a data breach at the same third-party collections firm has also affected about 7.7 million customers of LabCorp, another medical testing firm. LabCorp disclosed in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that AMCA notified it of data breach which occurred between August 1, 2018 and March 30, 2019. The filing did not state the date when AMCA notified LabCorp. The filing did state:

"AMCA is an external collection agency used by LabCorp and other healthcare companies. LabCorp has referred approximately 7.7 million consumers to AMCA... AMCA’s affected system included information provided by LabCorp. That information could include first and last name, date of birth, address, phone, date of service, provider, and balance information. AMCA’s affected system also included credit card or bank account information that was provided by the consumer to AMCA... AMCA has advised LabCorp that Social Security Numbers and insurance identification information are not stored or maintained for LabCorp consumers."

LabCorp said in the filing that it didn't provide patients' ordered tests, laboratory results, or diagnostic information to AMCA. AMCA is currently notifying about 200,000 LabCorp consumers whose credit card or bank account information may have been accessed. Also:

"AMCA has not yet provided LabCorp a list of the affected LabCorp consumers or more specific information about them. AMCA has indicated that it is continuing to investigate this incident and has taken steps to increase the security of its systems, processes, and data. LabCorp takes data security very seriously, including the security of data handled by vendors. AMCA has informed LabCorp that it intends to provide the approximately 200,000 affected LabCorp consumers with more specific information about the AMCA Incident, in addition to offering them identity protection and credit monitoring services for 24 months."

Given the ongoing investigation and breach notification, more news seems likely. Both breaches suggest other AMCA clients may have been affected. A check of the AMCA website at press time failed to find any news releases or mentions of both data breaches. C/Net reported:

"LabCorp also said that as a result of the breach, it's stopped sending new collection requests to the AMCA and suspended the AMCA's work on any pending requests related to LabCorp customers... LabCorp declined to comment beyond its SEC filing. AMCA said it conducted an internal audit after being notified of the breach by an outside security compliance firm and took down its web payments page. The company has also hired a third-party forensics firm to investigate the breach and has notified law enforcement."

The Krebs On Security blog reported:

"... AMCA also does business under the name “Retrieval-Masters Credit Bureau,” a company that has been in business since 1977. Retrieval-Masters also has an atrocious reputation for allegedly harassing consumers for debts they never owed. A search on the company’s name at the complaints page of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) turns up almost 700 complaints for Retrieval-Masters. The company has an abysmal “F” rating from the Better Business Bureau, with 60 complaints closed against it in the last three years. Reviewing a number of those complaints reveals some of the AMCA’s other current and/or previous clients, including New Jersey’s EZPass system.

Both data breaches reminder patients that when companies outsource collections activities, patients' sensitive healthcare and payment information are often shared with outsource vendors. The lack of breach details makes one wonder if AMCA executives were caught unprepared with both inadequate data security on its payments website, and post-breach responses. Hopefully, future news reports will clarify things.

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