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White Hat Hacker: Social Media Is a 'Goldmine For Details' For Cyberattacks Targeting Companies

Many employees are their own worst enemy when they start a new job. In this Fast Company article, a white hat hacker explains the security fails by employees which compromise their employer's data security.

Stephanie “Snow” Carruthers, the chief people hacker within a group at IBM Inc., explained that hackers troll:

"... social media for photos, videos, and other clues that can help them better target your company in an attack. I know this because I’m one of them... I’m part of an elite team of hackers within IBM known as X-Force Red. Companies hire us to find gaps in their security – before the real bad guys do... Social media posts are a goldmine for details that aid in our “attacks.” What you find in the background of photos is particularly revealing... The first thing you may be surprised to know is that 75% of the time, the information I’m finding is coming from interns or new hires. Younger generations entering the workforce today have grown up on social media, and internships or new jobs are exciting updates to share. Add in the fact that companies often delay security training for new hires until weeks or months after they’ve started, and you’ve got a recipe for disaster..."

The obvious security fails include selfie photos by interns or new hires wearing their security badges, selfies showing log-in credentials on computer screens, and selfies showing passwords written on post-it notes attached to computer monitors. Less obvious security fails include group photos by interns or new hires with their work team. Group photos can help hackers identify team members to craft personalized and more effective phishing e-mails and text messages using co-workers' names, to trick recipients into opening attachments containing malware.

This highlights one business practice interns and new hires should understand. Your immediate boss or supervisor won't scour your social media accounts looking for security fails. Your employer will outsource the job to another company, which will.

If you just started a new job, don't be that clueless employee posting security fails to your social media accounts. Read and understand your employer's social media policy. If you are a manager, schedule security training for your interns and new hires ASAP.

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