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FTC To Distribute $31 Million In Refunds To Affected Lifelock Customers

U.S. Federal Trade Commission logo The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced on Tuesday the distribution of about $31 million worth of refunds to certain customers of Lifelock, an identity protection service. The refunds are part of a previously announced settlement agreement to resolve allegations that the identity-theft service violated a 2010 consent order.

Lifelock has featured notable spokespersons, including radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, television personality Montel Williams, actress Angie Harmon, and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who is now the personal attorney for President Trump.

The FTC announcement explained:

"The refunds stem from a 2015 settlement LifeLock reached with the Commission, which alleged that from 2012 to 2014 LifeLock violated an FTC order that required the company to secure consumers’ personal information and prohibited it from deceptive advertising. The FTC alleged, among other things, that LifeLock failed to establish and maintain a comprehensive information security program to protect users’ sensitive personal information, falsely advertised that it protected consumers’ sensitive data with the same high-level safeguards used by financial institutions, and falsely claimed it provided 24/7/365 alerts “as soon as” it received any indication a consumer’s identity was being used."

Lifelock logo The 2015 settlement agreement with the FTC required LifeLock agreed to pay $100 million to affected customers. About $68 million has been paid to customers who were part of a class action lawsuit. The FTC is using the remaining money to provide refunds to consumers who were LifeLock members between 2012 and 2014, but did not receive a payment from the class action settlement.

The FTC expects to mail about one million refund checks worth about $29 each.

If you are a Lifelock customer and find this checkered history bothersome, Consumer Reports has some recommendations about what you can do instead. It might save you some money, too.

Comments

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Kenneth London

I've always been leary of Lifelock's ads

1. With billions of transactions each day at billions of e-commerce sites an entity like Lifelock can't possibly
monitor every transaction. (So what good is it?)
2. Many of those servers are secure, the customers use VPNs, or other encryption methods, an entity like lifelock can't monitor those.
3 John Doe works at xxxx coffee shop. He clones a customers credit card and then uses it to buy stuff. A company like Llfelock can't monitor transactions like this.

So i've come to the conclusion that a service like Lifelock is a complete waste of time and money.

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